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TO SEIZE VANCOUVER.

GERMAN PLOT REVEALED. A PLAN THAT FAILED. LONDON, August 28. The Toronto correspondent of "The Times" says that German plans to seize Vancouver and other Pacific coast cities have been revealed to the authorities. A German broker named Alvensleben, who was in Berlin when the war started, telegraphed before the war began to a friend at Vancouver, urging him to inaugurate an agitation to invite Admiral von Spee's squadron, then on the China coast, to visit Vancouver.

A committee was formed, and meetings held. If '■■> the; arrangement had succeeded, the Gneisenau and the Scharnhorst would have attempted to take possession of Vancouver, Victoria, and Prince Rupert, the new port north of • Vancouver. From Vancouver the Germans planned to control the Pacific cable, and the route to Vladivostock.

DARDANELLES CASUALTIES.

LIEUT H. A. SHAIN. Private advices report the death, at the Dardanelles, of Lieutenant H. A. Shain, of the Canterbury Battalion. He was a son of the late Mr W. O. Shain, who was district engineer of public works for Nelson. He was an old boy of Nelson College, and until he went to the front he was a second lientenant in the Nelson senior cadets.

LANCE-SERGEANT A. R. GREENWOOD. Lance-Sergeant Arthur Robert Greenwood, Canterbury Mounted Regiment, who has been killed in action, was the youngest son of Mr G. D. Greenwood, of Teviotdale, Amberley. He was educated at Harrow. He spent two or three years in a Christchurch office, and then went on his father's station. He enlisted in the Main Expeditionary Force.

LANCE-SERGEANT E. G. MILES.

Lance-Sergeant Eric Gordon Miles, Canterbury Battalion, who has been killed in action, was the oldest son of Mr arid Mrs H. M. Miles, of Office Road, Merivale, and was 23 years old. He was born in Temuka and was educated at the Temuka District High School. He was a very bright scholar, was dux of the school, and won the first junior national scholarship in South Canterbury. When he joined the Main Expeditionary Force he was on the staff of* the Canterbury Farmers' Co-operative Association, Timaru. He was formerly secretary to the Temuka Hockey Club, and was a South Canterbury representative hockey player. He was an enthusiastic Territorial LANCE-CORPORAL G. L. ILSLEY. Lance-Corporal George Leslie Ilsley, Canterbury Mounted Regiment, who has been killed in action, was a son of Mr W. Ilsley, a Melbourne barrister, and was about 24 years old. For about two years he was in the Melbourne office of y the Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance Company, and then Jbe was transferred to Christchurch, arriving here on April 18, 1914. He was inspector to the Canterbury branch of the company. For about three months he was quartered in Timaru, and then he returned to Christchurch. He enlisted in the Main Expeditionary Force. .Lance-Corporal Ilsley was well known and was very popular. He was a fine tenor singer. Two of his brothers are also serving the Empire.

LANCE-CORPORAL M. O. MOORE.

Lance-Corporal Maurice Oswald Moore, Canterbury Mounted Regiment, who has been killed in action, was a member of a well-known Okain's Bay family. He was about 25 years old, and was a schoolteacher by profession, being master of the Springfield School when he enlisted in the Main Expeditionary Force. For some years he was a member of the Christchurch Football Club's first fifteen. Last year he represented Malvern County in Rugby. He had also represented the Peninsula sub-union. He was the first winner of the McGully Cup, which is competed for annually by members of the Red and Black Association, in long distance running events. In the old volunteer days he was an enthusiastic member of the Canterbury Yeomanry Cavalry.

CORPORAL R. E. PRICE. Mr Harry Price, licensee of Warner's Hotel, Christchurch, was advised yesterday that his son, Corporal R. E. Price, of the 2nd Australian

Battalion, has'been wounded. Corporal Price is 23 years old. He was born and educated in Wellington. For two years before he enlisted he was in Sydney, on the staff of McArthur and Co., soft goods warehousemen. PRIVATE H. E. J. WOOTTON. Private Henry Ernest John Wootton, Canterbury Battalion, who was killed in action on August 7, was % a son of Mr E. J. Wootton, of Belfast, and was 26 years old. He was born and educated in Belfast, and subsequently employed as a clerk in the Belfast office of the Canterbury Frozen Meat Company. He was secretary of the Belfast Social and Athletic Club, was connected with several sports, and was a good pianist. Private Wootton went to the front in the Main Expeditionary Force. .

PRIVATE S. SMITH. The Rakaia correspondent of The Sun writes:—Deep distress has been caused in the district by the information received of the death, on August 7, at the Dardanelles, of Private Sydney Smith, second son of Mr H. Smith, of Rakaia. He was the first man to enlist from here, and has been the first to lose his life for King and country. Some weeks ago he was wounded with a shrapnel bullet in the thigh while carrying a wounded man to safety, and a few days ago a letter was received from his brother, Private Valentine Smith, who is also in the trenches, telling of the rejoicing of his comrades at Sydney's return to the firing line. The deceased soldier was in his 23rd year,, and very popular. He was a prominent footballer and a mentbef of the 1.0.0. F. He was an old boy of the Rakaia School.

PRIVATE T. P. MAHALM. Private T. P. Mahalm, Canterbury Battalion, who has been killed in action, was born in Lyttelion, and was educated at the Marists Brothers' School, Christchurch. He was a motorman on the Christchurch Tramways for some time, until he went to Adelaide, where he was also employed in the tramways service. Then he returned to New Zealand, arid resided on the West Coast. At the beginning of the war he was visiting Christchurch, and he promptly enlisted.

TROOPER A. HANMER. Mr George Hanmer, of Christchurch, was informed yesterday that his third Trooper Anthony ("Tony") Hanmer, of the machine gun section of the Canterbury Mounted Regiment, was killed in action on August 10. Trooper Hanmer was 24 years old. He was educated at Christ's College and at Wanganui Collegiate School. After being in an office in Christchurch for a time, he took-up. farming, and when the war broke out he was managing Mr Gordon Fulton's station at Mt. Stewart. He went to the front with the Main Expeditionary Force, in the machine gun section which. was commanded by the late Lieutenant Francis Davison. A brother, Lieut J. P. Hanmer, of the Australian, Forces, was wounded recently, but recovered and* returned to the firing line.

PRIVATE C. C. YORKE. Private Cecil Gourtenay... Yorke, Canterbury Battalion, who has been killed in action, was a son of Mr J. C. Yorke, officer in charge of the Masterton office of the Department of Labour, and was about 24 years old. He was born and educated in Oamaru. Six years ago. tie joined the Oamaru staff of the Bank of New South Wales, and later he was transferred to Wellington and then to Amberley. He resigned from the bank's service to join the literary staff of the "Lyttelton Times," of which he was a member when he enlisted in the Main Expeditionary Force. Private Yorke was a keen Territorial and an excellent rifle shot.

TROOPER G. W. SMITH. Trooper George Wyse Smith, Canterbury Mounted Regiment, who has been killed in action, was a son of the late Mr W. W. Smith, builder, of Christchurch, and of Mrs Smith, of Redcliffs, and was 23 years old. He was educated at the Christchurch Boys' High School, but while in Great Britain in one of three visits which he made to the Old Country for a time he attended the Glasgow College. He took up farming. After reaching Egypt with the Canterbury Mounted Regiment he was injured through his horse falling on him, and he was in hospital for six or seven weeks. He went to the firing line at the end of June.

PRIVATE H. RHIND. . Mr H. E. Rhind, Lyttelton, has received advice that his brother, Private Hector Rhind, has been wounded in the chest and side by shrapnel and is in No 19 General Hospital, Alexandria. Mr Rhind also received a cable stating that his brother, Corporal Harold Rhind, who was seriously wounded in action at the Dardanelles some time ago, is making satisfactory progress towards recovery at St. Thomas's Hospital, London.

LIEUT. A. D. STITT. Advice has been received that Lieutenant Alan D. Stitt, of the Canterbury Battalion, has been wounded a third time. Lieutenant Stitt is a son of the late Mr Matthew Stitt, of Ashburton, and is 2d years old. He was educated at Christ's College, where he was in the first Rugby fifteen, the first cricket eleven, and the shooting team, and was an officer in the college cadets. After leaving Christ's College, he went to Lincoln College, where he

captained the senior Rugby fifteen and was also an Ellesmere sub-union representative. He went to the front in the Main Expeditionary Force. SERGEANT E. M. STRACHEY. Mr and Mrs C. M. Strachey, of Gloucester Street, Christchurch, have received private cabled advice that their second son, Sergeant Ewen Macpherson Strachey, who went to the Front with the Fourth Reinforcements for the Canterbury Battalion, is in a hospital in London, suffering from a wound in one of his legs. No official notification that their son has been wounded has been received by them, but it happened that Sergeant Strachey was taken to a hospital in which a cousin, Lieutenant Macpherson, of the Cameron Highlanders, who was severely wounded in France several months ago, was lying. A sister of Lieutenant Macpherson, herself a nurse by profession, joined the hospital staff, in order to nurse her brother. When Sergeant Strachey was taken there she recognised him. Sergeant Strachey is just on 23 years of age. He was educated at Christ's College. Then he joined the Christchurch staff of the New Zealand Insurance Company, but about 16 months ago he took up farming in Marlboroughir He was well-known as a member of the Christchurch Rugby Football Club's senior fifteen and as secretary of the Canterbury Amateur Athletic Club. TROOPER T. W. STRINGER. Trooper Trevor William Stringer; Auckland Mounted Regiment, who has been wounded, is the youngest son of Mr Justice Stringer, and is 22 years old. He was born in Christchurch, and was. educated at Christ's College and at Waitaki High School. After leaving school he took up farming in the King Country. He enlisted in the Main Expeditionary force.

PRIVATE T. LIVINGSTONE. Mr Thomas Livingstone, of 436 Durham Street, Christchurch, has been advised that his second son, Private Thomas Livingstone, of the 4th. Australian Battalion, is in the Ist Australian General Hospital at Heliopolis, with a bullet wound in one of his legs. Private Livingstone is 30 years old. For a time he was in the service of the New Zealand Farmers* Go-operative Association, Christchurch, but for about eight years subsequently he was a commercial traveller in Sydney. He was a member of the Australian Ad-, vance Force which seized German New Guinea. On returning to Sydney he volunteered for the Front. One of his brothers, Corporal R. H. Livingstone, of the Canterbury Battalion, who has been wounded a second time, is in the same hospital.

LIEUT. J. W. CRAMPTON. Mrs J. W. Crampton has received advice that her husband, Lieutenant Crampton, signalling officer to the Canterbury Infantry Battalion, was slightly wounded on August 19, and is progressing favourably. Lieutenant Crampton is 33 years old. He served in the Royal Navy for several years, and then joined the Royal New Zealand Artillery. Six years ago he went to Fiji, became a tenant in the Fijian Defence Force, and ultimately commanded the force. In 1912 he resigned that position and returned to New Zealand. He joined the New Zealand Staff Corps, and was appointed a sergeantinstructor, with the position of ser-geant-major to the Canterbury district signal companies. He was moted to commissioned rank in the field.

LIEUT. J. F. TONKIN. Lieutenant John F. Tonkin, Canterbury Battalion, who is reported to be sick*, is a son of Mr J. G. S. Tonkin, who was a prominent resident of Waikari for 32 years. Lieutenant Tonkin is 2(5 years old. He was educated at Christ's College. Then he joined the Christchurch staff of Dalgety and Co,, Ltd., but was afterwards transferred to' Tim-, aru. While in Christchurch he was a member of the Christchurch Rugby Football Club's first fifteen. He held a commission in the Timaru senior cadets. Lieut. Tonkin went to the front with the 4th Reinforcements.

PIONEER (BOB) LAWRENCE. Mr Alfred Lawrence, of 39 Cornwall Street, St. Albans, received a cable on Sunday morning stating that his son, No 6/1090 Pioneer A. (Bob) Lawrence had been severely wounded in both knees with shrapnel, and had been landed at Malta Hospital on August 12. He was one of a small band of 11 Pioneers attached to the 13th Canterbury Regiment, and from latest advices there were only two not out of action. Pioneer Lawrence was born in St. Albans and was 20 years of age when he enlisted. He was educated at the St. Albans Main School, and had just finished his apprenticeship with Mr Francis Clark, electrician, of Christchurch. At the outbreak of war he was among the first to enlist. He sailed with the Main Expeditionary Force, and landed in Egypt where he took part in the defence of the Suez Canal against the Turks. Later he was among those who landed at the Dardanelles on that historic occasion, and has been in the firing line or living in a dug-out ever since. Pioneer Lawrence was one of the original members of the Cranford Hockey Club, and took an active interest in th'at sport. He was also a pigeon flyer and was a member of the Christchurch Homing Pigeon Club.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SUNCH19150830.2.44.26

Bibliographic details

TO SEIZE VANCOUVER., Sun, Volume II, Issue 485, 30 August 1915

Word Count
2,341

TO SEIZE VANCOUVER. Sun, Volume II, Issue 485, 30 August 1915

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