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THE PLAYGROUND.

(By “Onlooker.") Athletes are reminded that entries for the Cromwell Caledonian Society's Sheffield Handicap (135 yards) of £lO close this (Saturday) evening. The programme contains an £8 T5 yards handicap and other valuable prizes, and athletes visiting the meeting, which takes place on April 10. can catch the Clyde fixture on Easter Monday.

It is claimed that the recently-affiliat-ed Auckland Athletic Association will soon be the strongest centra under the New Zealand Athletic Union. To bring this about will necessitate the recruiting of over 40 societies, as the Otago ruling body has over this number to their credit. There are a few people not one hundred miles from Invercargill who will be interested in the news that the N.Z.A.U. has now over. 200 sports societies on its books.

New' Zealand had a very able representative In the English Rugby team in the person of A. C. Palmer, of London Hospital, who played wing threequarter for England against Ireland, and had a large share in the victory for his side. Another New Zealander. L. B. Stringer, of Guy’s Hospital, was taken over to Dublin by the English team as reserve man, but his services were not called upon. Palmer scored two tries and kicked a goal. He ran with splendid resolution, and his fine speed enabled him to hold Deane, his Irish vis-a-vis, completely in check. His first international was a pronounced success, and showed that he should have received his cap earlier. England played up really well in this match, and defeated Ireland on Irish soil for the first time in fourteen years, the score being 11 points to 5. A. S. Heale, the New Zealand half-back who played for London Hospital, has not yet won his English cap, although good judges declare there is not a better half in the kingdom. “But apparenttly England, with an independence which need not be gainsaid, shrinks from relying too much on outside talent. Otherwise, I fancy both Stringer and Heale would have been in the international team long ago.

The West Coast Centre of the N.Z. Athletic Union has taken over control of cycling In their district and joined with Taranaki in registering competitors under the Union. • The Invercargill Gun Club are in the field with an attractive proposal for Good Friday. They intend conducting a £1 sweepstake Easter Handicap (7 birds, 4 0 yards boundary), to be shot off at Grasmere. In addition there will b clay pigeons and live bird sweeps. In the big event the prize money will he allotted on a percentage basis 25, and 15.

At the winter general meeting of the British National Rifle Association it was announced (hat this year’s jubilee Disley meeting would extend from July 12 to July 24. No fewer than three teams are expected to arrive from South Africa, while Canada and other parts of the empire would be strongly represented. To encourage these a special prize would be awarded to the colonial team making the highest aggregate In the Kolapore Cup and Macklnnon Cup matches.

Some little time ago Mrs Hyde, a resident of the Hunter River district (Now South Wales) issued a challenge to row any lady sculler in the State for £25 aside, either on the Parramatta River or over the Raymond Terrace course. If the race took place on the latter course she would allow £5 expenses, and if on the Parramatta she would accept a similar amount. The challenge was accepted by a Sydney lady, Miss Gertie Lewis, and negotiations were opened up After a little delay satisfactory terms were arrived at, ami a match bus now boon practically decided upon, to be rowed on the Parramatta River, for £25 aside. Articles are being drawn up. and will probably bo signed within a day or two. Peter Hannon, who is now in India, where jic arrived recently from Australia. wrestled William Hlgson (’’ Big Ben”), late of the Shropshire Regiment, itt the Hippodrome, Calcutta, on January 7. Higson had a big advantage In weight, scaling list to the list 41b of his opponent, but Hannon’, activity and superior knowledge of the game gained him the first fall in 8 min. with a hammer lock and crutch, hold, and the second fall in 8 min. 50 secs, with a halfnelson and scissors hold.

■WTirXOIT QUOiriNQ CIiUB. It is the intention of the above club (remarks the Winton Record) to hold a Handicap Sweepstake on Good Friday and Saturday, and the event promise." to eclipse ail previous competitions hold by the club since its inauguration. It can bo said without exaggeration that Winton is the centre of (inciting in the dominion, and this statement is substantiated by the fact that at the competitions held under the auspices of the local club, competitors from as far north as Auckland attend to participate in the games. Some thirty entries have so far been received, which include, besides local players and those from the immediate surrounding districts, several visitors from the North Island. The local club is (o be congratulated upon being the centre of attraction of the oldest of all out-door sports, as it is said to have originated with the Greeks, and was first played at the Olympian games, J.-IC3 B.C. We are told that in consequence of inadvertently lulling his grandfather. when throwing a quoit, Perseus left the kingdom of Argos, and exchanged it for that of Mycenae, 131 B.C. These notices suffice to prove the antiquity' of the pastime. The modern quoit is a much lighter affair than the discus wielded by the Greeks. The disc thrower has been the subject of some of the finest masterpieces of Greek sculpture. The indispensable requisites for the game are strength In the arms and shoulders, quickness of sight, with a capacity for measuring distances, and dexterity' of wrist, with the consequent development of all these qualities by its pursuit. BOXING. The Otago amateur championships ■hill he decided on April 21 and 22 in the Garrison Hall, Dunedin. At the National Sporting Club, London, Englishman Johnny Summers got the decision over Jimmy Britt on points at the end of the twentieth round. Britt is likely to visit Australia. It is expected that Val Newall and M. F. Ryan will Journey' from Southland to take part in the Otago championship fixture.

The Australian heavy-weight champion, W. Lang, has written to the Wellington Association in regard to giving exhibitions in the Empire City. In London recently Mr Mclntosh, who managed and acted as referee in the .Bums-Johnson fight, announced that the Sydney Stadium will seat 20,400 spectators, and that every seat was occupied during the big- contest. The receipts amounted to £36,200, less £3OO, which had to be returned cwlng to ticket holders being unable to get into the Stadium. These figures surpass all American records, and writers in the United States press are attempting to disprove them. The annual report of the Wellington Boxing Association states that five competitions were held during the season, and that the sport in the ‘district is In a flourishing condition. The balancesheet shows the receipts to have been £1297 7s 3d. and the expenditure £892 18s, leaving a credit balance of £404 9s 3d, which includes ,U]e balance from Uie previous year of £220 13s Sd. The receipts from the five competitions were £IO3B 16s 6d, and the expenditure therewith £759 7s Id. Mr C. Walton elsewhere advertises particulars as to his opening boxing -dassesln Invercargill, He has already*

enrolled a number of pupils, and expects to make a start during the course of the next fourteen days. It la more than likely that -Jack Johnson and Sam Langford, both duskyskinned boxers, will meet at the National Sporting Club, London, on Derby night (May 26.) An offer has been made In Sydney to provide a substantial purse for a meeting between Jim Griffin and Arthur Crlpps during Easter week. On Easter Monday night Frank Thorn and Sid Sullivan are to box in Melbourne at 9.2. It Is said that ex-Maorl-lander W. Elliott will meet Sullivan presently. Elliott will be giving away weight.

On the evening of St. Patrick's Day Dave Smith, ex-Australasian amateur champion, defeated George Reidy (Sydney) in a match of fifteen rounds at the Brisbane Stadium. Smith was well ahead on points at. the end, and thus gained the decision. The contest is described as one of the finest ever seen in Queensland’s capital. Smith is stated to have Improved greatly since leaving the amateur ranks, and now forms another of the gallant band of pro. boxers who uphold the credit of New Zealand in other lands.

SKIEFUE FEATHEB-WEIGHTS FINISH EVEN. BILLY ELLIOTT AND FRANK FITZJOHN. A GREAT CONTEST GOES TWENTY ROUNDS. A crowded house watched a great fight at the Gaiety on the evening of March 23 (reports the S. Referee). Frank Fitzjohn and Billy Elliott, cx-ban-tam-weight-champlons of Australasia, were the principals. Such a fine couple of lads have rarely been matched. Both were well charged with pluck, and each showed the skill of the game as it is seldom seen nowadays.

Sid Sullivan, Harry Dawson, Pap Sullivan, and Jimmy Russell were behind Fitzjohn and Elliott’s wants had the attention of his trainer (Patsy Burke), Bob Bryant, and Ellis Mobbs. In the opening round there was an eagerness on both sides to get to It that pleased the house immensely, and already the footwork and countering of the two clever boys placed them on good terms with the follower of the game who hungers for science as well as force and grit. The master weapon—the. left —was much In evidence, and came from the shoulder straight as a dart or cleanlyhooked as the situation required. Fltz won the honours of the opening round. Elliott roughed a good deal In the second, and transgressed the Queensberry code once or twice by hanging on with one hand while he walloped the other home. Tilings wont slightly Elliott’s way this time.

Lefts full of power went to Fltzjohn’s credit in the second, till a right-across to the jaw brought a serious expression about his face. Elliott was cautioned for holding and hitting, and he—little man that the boy is—acknowledged his fault by shaking hands with the other youngster. The fourth was an even time, as full of fight as an egg is said to bo full of meat. So equal were things throughout the fifth that one could only mark just the shadow of a lead to Fitz’s credit. And thus the engagement proceeded. The sixth was the Sydneyite’s, also the -•oventh, while the eighth saw neither n bit better than tire other, but Elliott bolted during the ninth—literally took the bit in his teeth and retired to be groomed with a good surplus in hand, Elliott was master in the tenth, the eleventh, the twelfth, the thirteenth, and the fourteenth, but never by more that a slight margin. In the fifteenth Fitzjohn forced hi. way to the front by a triile, but wa; compelled to play second fiddle again In the next.

The sixteenth saw Frank assort him•elf once more, and he never let the advantage slip again, excepting to a slight extent in the twentieth round.

There was certainly little to choose between the pair at the end, and no mar could justly cavil at Jim Barron’s verdict —a draw.

FOOTBALL. SOUTHLAND ASSOCIATION. The annual meeting of the Southland football Association, held last evening, was attended by some half dozen members. Mr S. McDonald (President), occupier. the chair. The annual report noted the great progress that the game had mads in Southland during the past season. A team had travelled as far as Timaru, playing matches against South Canterbury am! Otago, winning the former, but wive beaten by Otago. Nightcaps, Underwood, -Bluff and Invercargill engaged in

Cup competition, and after a' series of interesting games, Bluff, the youngest ■liib In Southland, carried oft the bon- ■ airs. Otago intcrprovlnclal eleven defeated Southland by 3 goals to I—by co means a disastrous defeat. To enter lor the Brown shield competition at Duncd-in the Association bad been compelled to sever its connection with the Otago Associaton, and stand an a unit of the New Zealand Association. Regarding the Brown shield contest Southland had been unsuccessful. During thcyear the S.F.A. was re-organised, and an Executive formed to carry out affairs. A question for the incoming Executive will be the formation of rules and regulations for the government of ''Soccer," The balance-sheet showed a credit of £2 2s to be carried over to the 190!) season.

In moving the adoption of the report and balance-sheet the President suggested that in future clubs might be better represented at meetings of the ruling body. Association football, he considered, might be introduced into the schools bv asking the co-operation of the teachers. This step would be a valuable adjunct towards the furtherance of the game.

Mr P T ren seconded the motion, which was duly carried.

The following office-bearers werej Oiected; —Patron, Hon. Sir J. G. Ward; President, Mr S. McDonald; Vice-presi-dents, Messrs W. Macalister, Captain Hutton, Wj Hinchoy, A. Inglls, J. Haln, J. D. McGrner, G. Uren (Wellington), and E. B, Patrick; hon. secretary and treasurer, Mr A. S. Wallace; assistant secretary, Mr J. MacGregor - auditors, Messrs J. Howie and P. Uren; Executive, Messrs A. D. Burn, J. W. H. Bannerman, C. S. Stewart, W. Kelly, W. W. Titterton, A. S. Wallace, and two delegates representing the various clubs affiliated to the Association.

The Bluff delegate enquired in regard to the Cup and Medals delegated to the winners of the competition, which they had not so far received. The secretary was instructed to enquire into the matter and furnish a report to the Executive at its next meeting. Mr G. Uren (Wellington), was appointed the Council’s delegate on the N.Z.F.A.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

THE PLAYGROUND., Southland Times, Issue 14073, 3 April 1909

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2,301

THE PLAYGROUND. Southland Times, Issue 14073, 3 April 1909

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