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Obituary

JAMES FAKKKR JOYCE

The najvs of the sudden decease of one of Southland's oldest settlers, Mr J.P. Joyce, will be received with general regret, not only in the immediate district, throughout the whole of Southland. For some considerable time Mr Joyce had been suffering from heart disease, und though ho has in consequence led a somewhat quiet life, his decease was not expected. He retired to rest on Thursday day evening apparently in fairly goad health, but yesterday morning it was found that he had quietly pussed away.

Mr Joyce was born at Southampton, England, on 17th March. 1834, and was thus (58 years of age. A large part of his early life was spent in the Channel Islands and in Franco, where he travelled aa agent for Brunton's patent safety fuse, which had just been brought out. He then acquired a knowledge of the French language. with which he became thoroughly conversant. He was afterwards employed in the British Customs Department in Southampton, and subsequently emigrated to Victoria, where he was domiciled during the famous gold' fever in 1851. He came to this colony in 1857, taking up agricultural and pastoral work, in which connection ho acquired more than average fame for his prowess as a stockman. He caime to Southland in the year 1858, where he stayed some time with Mr Edwin Rich, of the Tuturau Station, on the Mataunt. In August, 18'il, Mr John Turnbull purchased the run. and Mr Joyce was afterwards engaged by him as manager. and remained in that gentleman's employ until the breaking out ol the Wakatipu goldfields. early in the year 1862. For some time then he acted us waggoner, earning at times as much as £100 a ton freight for carriage over the then devious tracks from Invercargill to " Longford " (now Gon>), jind along the eastern bank Of the iUataura, re-crossing that river at Pyramids — thence following the Waiiuea Plains to the Elbow, and thence north to Kingston. He engaged in storekeeping, hut the business dwindled with the decline of the mining industry, anil he came down to Invercargill, where in 18H3 he was appointed clerk to the Town Board, which numbered among its members Messrs W. B. Scandrett, C . Luiusden, and several other present residents. In 18r>5"tht» board made way for tho borough council, and a little later Mr Joyce whoso journalistic capacity had been .shown by many literary contributions to various journals, was appointed editor of The Southland Times, which at that time was in the hands of Messrs Reynolds and Co. When a change of ownership took place' Mr Joyce retired, but again found an opportunity of carrying on journalistic work by filling the editor's chair in the otlice of our contemporary — the Southland News, a position which. he filled for many years.

Whether as a writer or as it speaker Mr Joyce was a master of clear ami trenchant language, and his quite exceptional personality enabled him to use this great gift with the utmost ellect. In the days of his vigour he was a " masterful " man. His interests were wide. He was prominent in public affairs, and was associated among otht>r things with the Seaward Hush railway. He was an ardent student of horticulture and pisciculture, handling both subjects as an expert." A man of strong physique himself, he pave a share of his attention to sport and pastime, but was most enthusiastic about aquatics.

Naturally, Mr Joyce's strong views ond ready address led him into the j olitioal world. Tie represented the constituencies of Wallace and Awarua at different times. lie was returned for Wallace in 1876. nnd on tho redistribution of seats after the dissolution of 1879 hs was elected for Awarua. and was re elected in 1882. At the general election of IPB7 he stood down in favour of Mr (now Sir .Joseph) Ward and did not n.;<tin etiter Parliament.

He leaves a widow, three sons and three daughters to mourn his doalh, and they will have the sympathy of the very wide circle of friends who appreciated the intellectual and personal qualities of their

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST19030117.2.21

Bibliographic details

Obituary, Southland Times, Issue 53374, 17 January 1903

Word Count
685

Obituary Southland Times, Issue 53374, 17 January 1903

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