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Lacrosse.

♦ [By Mega.] Having been asked to state an Opinion respecting this game and the progress made by the players, I made it my business to visit the^ Eastern Reserve last Saturday afternoon to observe critically the matoh arranged for that day, The weather wbb not so favourable for play as could "have been deeired, for there was a strong nor'-wester blowing across the ground, but the members of the club had mustered in force and an excellent contest took place. The sides were fairly matched and victory was not gained without a tough straggle. The trial of skill "was between lovers of the willow on the one hand and lovers of the raoket on the other, and the issue was in favour of the former, who gained three goals out of the five that were obtained during the play. As affording vigorous exercise lacrosse has many points in its favour. There is as much running as there is in football} without the severe exertion that the latter game entails. There is slso good training for the eye and nerve, in picking up the ball with the crosse and steadying it thereon while running from or dodging aa opponent. No one can excel at the game without possessing a quick eye and a steady. hand, just as without these qualifi* cations no player can make his mars; at cricket. There is not absent either that spice of danger without which no pastime appears to be congenial to British and Colonial youth, There is alwayß a chance of being disabled by a blow. from an opponent s crease or by falling heavily through colliding with another player. Thus in the game on Saturday afternoon Ddrcy came down with great violence' and so hurt his thigh that he had for a time to retire from the contest, Tarlton received a smart crack on the biceps from Sebo, and several others got their fingers Wrapped by the same player. In criticising a player's merits there seems to be four points to be considered — expertness iv picking up tha ball with the crosse ; dexterity in keeping it from falling off, or being knocked off 5 accuracy m i hrowing it to a friendly player or to goal ; and swiftness in running with it. In all these points the players have made noticeable advancement. The picking up is in many cases remarkably good and so are the carrying and throwing. The chief fault with the majority is a tendency to imagine that the crosse is a cricket bat or shinty stick and to use it accordingly— a fault that will soon however disappear. No player as yet shows as good form as McLean who introduced the game, and whose departure from th« town has been a serious loss to the club. The best imitator of him is Ham who excels now in all points, and whose play some of the younger members would do well to emulate. Tarlton is a strong player, always where wanted and seemingly nntiring. Hannah promises to be exceptionally good and so do Darcy, Twemlow, Strack, and Njvea. In running. Johnstoa, as at football, excels, ana Mitford is of eminent service in a scrimmage where his bulky frame stands him in good stead, i Kingsland also runs well and strongly, but is too apt to act as if batting, One player imitates the American eagle ; as that bird does not itself oatoh the fish but raps another bird that does 'until the fish fa dropped, so he does not pick up the ball himself , but rather raps at: the crosse of some other player that doesf in; order to make, him drop it. Brown' handles tha I ball creditably, but is hardly venturesome enough. Dick,' Aitjfen, arid several others whose names I -did not ascertain, diiplayed very fairxskill. r The game is not, I think, calculated to gain the popularity of either cricket or f ootball, though it has : aQ.:.3xcsj!es^^ 'eßtsbUshin^itßel^ is wasted that will afford needfqk^xerck* Ut $m who. Hn :»; dfotast* for fee rwjjfc'

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ness of Ilogtly fobtball, and lacrosse is well Buited to supply the i want* ": fhe costume, moieover r is pleasing and admirably iillod to eot off a good figure, and when tho respective sides don their pink i(W blue sashes the field of combat has a decidedly picturesque appearance. Tlie members of the club deserve credit for tiic progress already effected, and I have pleasure in wishing them continued prosperity. i

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18850825.2.19

Bibliographic details

Southland Times, Southland Times, Issue 8095, 25 August 1885

Word Count
748

Lacrosse. Southland Times, Issue 8095, 25 August 1885

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