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The Southland Times. PUBLISHED DAILY. Luceo Non Uro. WEDNESDAY, 30TH JULY, 1884.

We knew what we were bringing upon ourselves when we endeavored to sketch the position of Mr Andrew Kinross in the Awarua contest. You don't need to tread upon the tail of that gentleman's coat to provoke a quarrel with him— if you touch only a thread of his garment, it is enough. Mr Kinross, peaceable man as he is, is a political pugilist, and likes never to be long out of the fray. He has probably written more letters to the newspapers — about himself — than any other man in Southland has done about subjects of a good deal higher importance. Indeed his signature in the correspondence used to be as surely an indication of a coming political contest as the cuckoo in northern climes is the harbinger of spring. Mr Kinross is terrified that the world will forget him, and takes good care to keep himself well before the world. Some politicians, like some maidens, are coy arid want coaxing, and whether the coyness be real or assumed, there is always something winning about it. But Mr Kinross is never coy. It is always leapyear with him, and he jumps into the arms of the electors, as if under a perpetual privilege. Perhaps this is the reason that they have hitherto been so shy of his advances, and it might be worth his while just to try what a little reserve would do, even if it were the reserve that invites approaches. But we really have not the slightest ill-feeling towards Mr Kinross, although he* calls us hard names and refuses to admit us into the sacred precincts of Liberalism. We respect him as a model settler, who has played his part well to his neighborhood, to his district, and to the colony. We should desire to see men like him multiplied throughout New Zealand. But we can say all this without saying that there is any absolute necessity for Mr Kinross's being in Parliament. It is the idea of that necessity that seems to haunt himself and make his life unhappy. It troubles nobody else, we daresay, and may very well cease to trouble him. But it is a free country, and we have no right to limit anyone's aspirations, unless in the way of reasonable suggestion, which may be either taken or left alone. What led us to speak of Mr Kinrops, however, was not his idiosyncrasies, personal or political, but some remarks that occur in bis letter to us touching the present state of parties. We asked MiKinross, as we have asked others, to point out wherein Mr McDonald differed from him in his political creed. This has evidently been a poser for Mr Kinross, for he has given the question no direct answer, and he would be forced to give the reply, if he gave any. that the political difference between him and his opponent was simply nil. To the great distress, seemingly, of those who desired a monopoly in Liberalism, the old party distinctions have been in everything broken down ; and there is not a soul in the colony asking for a Conservative measure, in any department of politics, as opposed to a Liberal one. Those who did not originate them have acquiesced in the democratic measures that are now law in New Zealand, and if it were not for interested and professional demagogues, the names ot Liberal and Conservative would scarcely be heard in the country. Even our honest friend Mr Kinross, when pressed on the subject, has to revert to the past, and instead of judging Mr McDonald by his presont profession has to drag in whnt is called his " past career " to make him out a Conservative. But let Mr Kinross only try how this method would work else where. Mr Gladstone was once a Tory of the Tories, and is now so great a Liberal, if we may not say Radical, that the Tories hate him with a deadly hatred, How would it do if Mr Gladstone' were to be judged by his " past career" instead of by what he is now, and by what he is doin ; and proposes to do, The thing would b j ridiculous, and it is quite as absurd of Mr Kinross to propose to rake up the past, instead of taking men as they are before him. Those who were really liberal would rejoice in the cessation of all opposition to Liberalism, and would welcome all accessions to their ranks, instead of trying to keep up old barriers, and going back upon old differences. Bat this is not all. We are afraid that Mr JKiuross'tJ utterances go a good way to .discredit his own pretensions to Liberalism, and that he will have enough to do to keep himself within the fold. He say*, " I consider " that so long as there are capitalists " and laborers, so long will there be " Liberals and Conservatives." Now, if this has any meaning at all, it signifies that to be a Capitalist is to 1)3 of necessity a Conservative, and to be a Laborer is to be a Liberal. Is Mr Kinross ignorant of the fact that some of the greatest capitalists in England are the greateat Liberals, and that Associations of Working Men are ariiong the most noted forces of tho Conservative party? This, at any rate, is the fact, and what tikm becomes pf the implication that

Laborer and Liberal, and Capitalist nivl Conservative, are respectively synonymous term's?" They are no such" thing inyreality, and it is a wretched assump- ■ tion that "would make them so. Mr I Kinrosa'e " liberal" theory is that Capital and' Labor must be in necessary opposition, and that Capitalists and their advocates, and Laborers and their advo,catea, must be the enemies of each other. We ask, what sorb of Liberalism is this. ? Is it not rather the very essence of narrowness and bigotry ? Is the Capitalist never to rise — does he not ever rise — to the fair recognition' of the rights of Labor ; and is tke Laborer to continue imbued with the notion that Capital is his]enei»y and that he \i to be constantly armed against it ?. This is evidently the notion of Mr Kinross and. his. school, and a protty school of Liberalism it is. Would it not be better if Mr Kinross would get it into bis own head and try to impart it to others that Capital and Labor, instead of being antagonistic, are the friends and complements of each other ; and that to | raise scrife between them and place them | in constant enmity is to do to each the i greatest disservice. If politics in this country have come to be, as'^Mr Kinross . would have us believe, a mere contention between two classes that must continue to exist here as in' every other community while tbe world lasts, there is little hope of social harmony and social progress among 1 us. We would strongly recommend him to revise his Liberalism, if he wants it to be worthy of the name r and to suffer himself to ! believe that there may be a better Liberalism among those whom he stigmatises than the narrow creed he has so incautiously avowed. We repeat tbe hope that Tre hare seen the last of bootless interferences iv the Awarua elections, and that . the next fight will be between two strong men, and two only,

On the Alert. — A large rush occurred in Melbourne to clear spirits from bond before the Treasurer's Financial Statement, as it was anticipated the duty would be raised. The anticipation proved a correct one. " Pib Joseph Porter, K.C.B." — A benefit was given at the Theatre Boyal, Sydney, recently to Signor fiiccardi,jwho bad been Hi . for some time past. The entertainment realised £250, which was handed to the banefioiare, lunatic. — Andrew Livingstone, who was charged at the 8..M. Court on Monday with being of unsound mind, and remanded for medical examination, was conveyed to the Seacliif Asylum yesterday. Out of It.— The trial of Dr Cha*. Werner Gunst for causing the death of the barmaid Helen Toomb*, in Melbourne, by giving her an overdose of nurphia by mistake, took place recently. The accused was acquitted. Wikton. — The nomination of candidates to fill the vacancies in the Winton Borough Goiiuc Ij took place on Monday. Mr F. tt. Whits and G. O. Johnston were duly proposed, an 3, there being no other candidatts, were dec-Hied duly elected by the Returning Officer, Air J. K . Lea. Messrs A. McArthur and A. Liddle were elected auditors lor the borough. Who Seal 1 ".. It Be?— We (Otago Daily Times) have the best authority for saying that an intrigue is iv progress to "run" Mr Ormond for the Premiership in opposition to Sir Julius Yogel. The member for Napier has been promised all the influence of the Ministerial party, and the block vote of the Auckland and Napier members is expected. Strenuous efforts are beinp made to secure to votes of all the Middle Island members who are unpledged. Mineral. Riches.— A rich find of fold is jeported 25 miles from Silvertcn, N.S.W. In~ a shaft sunk 17 feet the reef shows ten inches wide. A magnificent lode of tin is also reported to have been discovered 18 miles from Silverton, A thousand tons of the lode were visible, estimated to contain ten per cent, of ore. Notwithstanding these finds people are still cautioned against going there unless provided with capital. Gazetted.— The District Land Registrar gives notice in the laie>t Gazette to hand that he will procoed to bring all the municipal reserves within the b;rough under the provisions of the 'J Land Transfer Act, 1870," unless caveat be lodged forbiddiag the same within one month frcm 24 h July. The blocks and the numbers of the sec'ijns, together with their holders are giveo. Becoming Famous.— The Otago Daily Times says that the lamentable hoaorariutn business has not yet b jen heard the last of. All through Australia the gieed of the mem"bersof tho New Z aland Parliament is the subject of discussion in every paper, and to do'ibt the shameful story will soon bo bandied about the English Press. What makes the matter worse is that, with few exceptions, reithcr the Legislative Councillors nor the members of the Eouse who voted against the honorarium hare offered to refund or give to public objects their illgotten gains. Eide A Wee.— The Dunedin Star says: — We are aware that efforts are baiDg made by certain leading politicians and their satellites to have a cut-and-<ried Ministry roady to take office forthwith ; but it would be better judgment to wait until the members are togethsr in Wellington, and see how the numerous independents and doubtfuls are likely to shape. Our own impression is that it will not bs such plain sailing a> s^ems to be anticipated, but that more than one Ministerial crisis may be anticipated before, a really sttong Ministry is constituted. Taking Precautions. —The Government are communicating by telegraph with the au!horitie3 in Australia and the health officers in this colony with refe;ence to the small pox question. The Gover.vment are awaiting replies before taking action, a? they do not wisb to enforce a general qusrantiae unless it is absolutely necessary, since it would very seriously disturb the large trade which tl i* colony has with Australia. Should io be decided not toenfo;c3 a general quarantine, every precau'Jou will be takui by the health officers to prevent tbe disease being carried in*o the colony by their making a | minute examination of every vessel fortra:e3 of the disease, and should any hz foivid, the vessel and pis-engers would be quarantined for the full pel iod. Want Watching, — Matuki, and 35 Waikato natives, arrived at Paritwka on fc'uaday, and e*eiy day there are fresh arrivals. Te Whiti ba3 not $€$ made any statement as fo what line of action he will, take, but Tohu 9ayß everything is now coming all right, and he will get back the land tor fche natives. As the planting season is now approaching, it is considered likely that the natives now assembled at Paribaka will remain to put in their crop a , and as there is sure to be some turbulent nauves among the assemblage it is t joughfc trouble may arise in their attempting to occupy the land of the settlsrj. It is understood that no steps will be taken to disyersethe natives from Pariaakaunle s they commit a lawless act, and one which might lead to bloodshed. The total numb'ir of natives at Paribaka now is about 150 J. ?.., An Explanation.— Mr 0. Voight, nightwatchman, having been accused of havipg. nnnece ; sarijy rung the fire bell on Sunday' inornins, requests space to m ike the fo lovriagexp'anatioa;—Atabout % a.m. be met the constable on duty in Dee street, and had pa3std him about one hundred yards, whan, , hd caw the reflection of fire. He immediately ran to the bell tower, where he s.iw the fire' was a long distance . away. He stopped at the' tew i\ for about t^eDty minutes, in ca*G any person should come to ring, bo as not to disturb the residents. /laving takerr'a turn rou-nd by Tay street, Mr Voight again met the eong'ablp, aad they walked t)gef.h£r i-ifo Dee stree-, where they he,<ml the fire b,»U ringing, and ran to «oe the cause.' They found another psrsoa ringing tha bell for thd sam 3 fire ih tt had been observed three quarters ofau h»ur previously. Mr Voight trusts that this statement of facts will be sufficient to saii^y tlja residents th it ha was not ih3 caase of. t,he fi.:e" bell ringing oa th.it; pccasjpn, . *

QtJliE A Disappointment.-— From. Dune- 1 din- it is reported that Mr Pish has discon-, tiDued his libel action against Mr Walters, ISVEROABGILL SCHOOL COMMITTEE.— rhe^b'irdinary meeting of this committee was attended by Messrs Trew (chairman), Birss, Harlany- Anderson, Froggatt, and Stead. Mr ff. Joyce' tendered his- resignation as pupil tpagher at the Central School. It was resolved ,to accept the resignation, the secretary being instructed to^ intimate ■,■ to Mrf Joyce that the committee riegrettecl the loss : uf Ms valuable services. The attendances at the schools were reported to be : very small, owing to the prevailing bad -weather. Mr Webber suggested that the committee should bring pressure to bear on the Borough Coun- 1 cil to have the approaches, to the South . School asphalted, -as many childien were kept from school through! their present bad condition. On the motion of Mr Frog-: gatt it was resolved to make the necessary ''.application to the Borough Council. The T chairman and the visiting committee were anthorised to attend to several small works aod wants at the Schools. Mr MehaSey recommended that Miss Martha Hamilton should bo appointed to fill the vacancy . caused by the resignation of Mr Joyce. I The committee resolved to endorse therecommendation, and to ask the Education Board to make the appointment suggested . The chairman and ; the visiting committee were empowered to confer with the hea3---1 masters with the view of arranging an. entertainment in aid of the committee's funds. Mr Stead, as a member of the visiting oommittee, said he had found that it would be very difficult to ascertain what children were not attending the school ; a house to house canvass would be necessary. Further consideration of the proposal to bring itf the compul-ory clause of the Education Act into forcfi was postponed. •Accounts amounting to L2B 15*9 d were passed for payment, and the committee adjourned, Bon 'Marchb Day.— This day a great clearing disposal of goods will take place to make way for Price and Bulleid's big sale. Just Received. — A choice selection of Dolmans and Jackets. We are able to offer these goods much below the regular prices, having received a large concession in the buying. People desiring a really Good and Fashionable Article at a small figure shoald not fail to pay Tie a. visit. — R. JD. Yctjce & Co. Don't fail to visit the cheap sale at the Ex hibition ; unusual bargains are to be had. The whole immense stock is being offered at reduced prices to make room for spring goods. When a cheap sale is advertised at the Exhibition it is a cheap sale. — Thomson & Bbattie, Invercaiwill Election. — To the free and independent electors of Invercargill, we, the undersigned, beg to offer ourselve sas candidates for public favor and support. We claim to be liberals of the trueet type, and might briefly state that our aim in the past has been to supply the public with the Cheapest Groceries in Town despite the " rest and be thankful " doctrine of effete Toryism, and thanks to a liberal and appreciative public we have been rewarded with encouraging support. Soliciting a continuance of your valued custom and support,—We are, ladies and gentlemen, your obedient and grateful servants, Macphereon and Prentice, Grocers. Club Buildings. Dee street. A Wise Deacon.—" Deacon Wilder, I want you to tell me how you kept yourself and family so well the past season, when all the rest of us have been sick so much, and have had the doctors running to us so often?" " Brother Taylor, the answer is very easy. I used Hop Bitters in time, and kept my family well, and saved large doctor's bills. Four shillings' worth of it kept us all well and able to work all the time, and I will warrant it has cost you and most of your neighbors £10 to £100 apiec. ot keep sick the same time. I fancy you'll take my medicine hereafter." See. We Believe that if every one would use Hop Bitters freely there would be much less sickness and misery in the world, and people are fast finding this out, whole families keeping well at a trifling cost by its use. We advise all to try it. Bead.

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The Southland Times. PUBLISHED DAILY. Luceo Non Uro. WEDNESDAY, 30TH JULY, 1884., Southland Times, Issue 4990, 30 July 1884

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2,991

The Southland Times. PUBLISHED DAILY. Luceo Non Uro. WEDNESDAY, 30TH JULY, 1884. Southland Times, Issue 4990, 30 July 1884

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