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The Southland Times. PUBLISHED DAILY. Luceo Non Uro. THURSDAY, 26th JUNE, 1884.

There is intense electioneering activity all over the colony, and almost everywhere a plethora of aspirants for seats . Southland promises to be no whit behind in this particular, and the combatants are getting to be more clearly discerned. Beginning with the town of Tnvercargill, tbe present member for the town, Mr Henry Feldwick, has announced his intention again to contest the seat. That veteran, Mr George Lumsden, has also declared that he will take the field ; and Mr Joseph Hatch will be the third candidate. The district of Wallace is already being canvassed by two ex- members of Parliament, Mr Henry Hirst and Dr Hodgkinson j and Mr Daniel, the present member, is to try his fortune again. These may be said to exhaust the list of actual candidates for Wallace, but Mr Mackintosh, it was confidently stated a day or two ago, was to stand ; and the name of Mr James Gardner has likewise been mentioned in connection with this electorate, although he is said to be divided between it aad Hokonui. Hokonui is likely to be keenly contested. Mr Thomas Green is actively canvassing the Gore portion of tbe district. Mr Cothbert Cowan is presumably waiting to ascertain the value of the requisitions being signed in his favor. Mr Bain is said not to have made up his mind, although encouraging support has been offered him. Mr Alfred Baldey and Mr George McLeod are both alleged to havejtheir eyes on the seat, although neither has spoken the final word. The fact that Mr Henry Driver has declared himself for Bruce takes away an awkward complication, or at least the possibility of one, from the contest in Hokonui, and the combatants need no longer dread his shadow iatervening at an unexpected moment. Mataura wiil be a hardly fought field. 1 hese are two candidates only in view, Captain Mackenzie, the present member, and Mr G. P. Biehardson, his opponent, at last election. There is not the least probability of another appearing, for these gentlemen represent the two divisions of the district, and we imagine the contest will be waged very much on territorial grounds, and the banners of the North and South will probably range under them respectively all the electors. Awarua is the district where there is most uncertainty as to the field. Mr Joyce, now member for the district, has had it announced that he will stand again. Three other gentlemen are understood to bo feeling, in different quarters, the pulse of the electors. These are, Mr J. L. McDonald, Mr J. W. Mitchell and Mr Christopher Basa* tian. Mr Thomas Hodgkinson has announced that he will be a candidate, Jteyond, these no name has been msft»

tioned, and it seems unlikely that any will be added. We have said nothing about the views of the different candidates in the respective districts, but no doubt, immediately, meetings will be held, when they will show thuir colors and the public will know where they are to rank. The number of men aspiring to' take part in political life is a good sign for the country, and affords ample choice to the electors ; but it has its disadvantages. With such a host of candidates, we may be sure that in many districts there will be members of the same party jostling one another, and standing for personal rather than political reasons. Here, in the South, we can see that if the men who have declared themselves, and those who are likely yet to do so, go to the poll, there will certainly be a split of parties, and the result will not represent the political feeling of the electorates. It may be a severe test of loyalty, but, undoubtedly, where there are two or more candidates belonging to the same party in the field, a selection of one should be made and the other or others should be patriotic enough to retire. Electors should be careful not to commit themselves so that party interests would suffer by their preference for individuals. The matter of course is in the hands of the people them iselves, aucl tkoy oan ©ffootaally dispose of the pretensions of those who have simply their own ambition to gratify, and who would gratify it even at the expense of their party or the colony. Care in every instance should be taken that a vote shall not be thrown away, and that the fight shall be a square one between political principles on the one side and on the other.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18840626.2.10

Bibliographic details

The Southland Times. PUBLISHED DAILY. Luceo Non Uro. THURSDAY, 26th JUNE, 1884., Southland Times, Issue 4965, 26 June 1884

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765

The Southland Times. PUBLISHED DAILY. Luceo Non Uro. THURSDAY, 26th JUNE, 1884. Southland Times, Issue 4965, 26 June 1884

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