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The Derby.

Therace itself I can describe briefly. There was no false stirt .worth mentioning,' and as soon as the flag f 'ipvvered, Sigmophbne and Bon Joar making running for Goldfieid, and Ladislas went to the front, and' soon showed with a clear lead of the field, which waslieaded by /Splendor, Prince, arid Beau ' Brnmmel.' - As tney commenced coming down the hill to Tottenham" corner, Ladislas ran up to Ms stable companion ,Bon Jonf. Sigmaphone having some time previously lost his place, and as they swept by the corner Ladislas showed*' with the lead of Goldfieid, The Prince, Bean .Brmnmel, Galliard, Highland phief, arid " St. Blaise. . Here Wood on the latter, hugging th& rails in a most daring and wonderful manner, fairly swept through his field, and took his place alongside the leader. (Ladielas). No sooner was the French- ■ man collared than he Bhufc up, and »t Blaise came thundering, along with; Galliard; and Bean Brnmmel ,\ hard at his heels, and Goldfield and Highland Chief in close attendance. Just as a shout went up for Beau Brnmmel he died,away, and,, jEant_of _ condition., stopped him, and almost immediately after Goldfieid and Galliard were afe the whipi; v, TbiJ seemed to rjromise an easy victory for St Blaise, but all* afconce, as -they passed tthe stand, Webb brought out Highland Chief, and stride by stride he rapidlj commenced to catch the son of Hermit.- Wood, of course, rode desperately as he found himself being overhauled, and together they- dashed by" the winningpost* .■■'■' V ; . In Tattersall's ring no one knew which had won, an<i odds were laid on the Chief. The excitement was breathless until No 7 " went upj which showed that St Blaise had won, arid th'en-a tremendous, shout went up, and everyone .crowded towards the B^yal stand and cheered the Prince and Princess of Wales m9St; vociferously. The latter wore the chocolate and yel.'cw colors of the winner, andit is pret*y well known that the Prince Won a good stake by the success of the winner, evenif he .has. not a large interest in the horse itself. Anyhow, be' was present at Porter's place, with Sir Johnstone »ad Lord Ullington,;. when the horse was tried; and after the race he, shook bauds cordially -with Porter and Wood, an d invited the former to lunch with him in tae Boyal box, where he introduced him to the Princes 8 . (Poor Porter, did he feel comfortable ?} No other race on the Derby day was worth looking at. so 1 will say nothing about them. : With regard to the finish for the JDerby, I may say that Webb quite thought he had won, and that Wood was of xhe same opinion, and this notwithstanding that xhe judge gave it a neck in favor of sit Blaise-! -As a. proof that Wood thought he had been beaten, he told the mounted policemen who fame to escort him back to scale that that official.had made an error, for Webb. had won. — fiobin Hood.

A bntcher waa invited recently to attend a concert, but positively declined, even wben a free ticket was offered him. Pressed for his reason, he replied, 'If I went I should see so many people who owe me for meat that ih would spoil my fan.'

The following is recommend' d as a reading exercise :— ' I saw five brave maids, sitting on five broad beds, brtiding broad braids. I said to these five brave maids, sitting on five broad beds, braiding brond braids, "Braid broad braids^ brave maids." '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18830904.2.25

Bibliographic details

The Derby., Southland Times, Issue 4730, 4 September 1883

Word Count
585

The Derby. Southland Times, Issue 4730, 4 September 1883

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