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THE INVERCARGILL ELECTION.

» THE NOMINATION". The nomination of candidates for the representation of Invercargill took place at noon on Tuesday, 20th May, at the Courthouse. Mr D. S. Lawlor, who acted as Deputy Returning Officer, having opened the proceedings in the usual manner, Mr C. L. Fredric proposed, and Mr J. Whitefoord seconded, Mr John E. Cuthbertson as a fit and proper person to represent the constituency of Invercargill. These gentlemen, being well known supporters of Mr Wood, made no remarks on the views or merits of the candidate, and apparently adopted this course in to deprive Mr Cuthbertson's friends of the opportunity of speaking. Mr Thomas Pratt proposed Mr "Wood, and spoke at considerable length, characterising the Yogel Ministry as the most corrupt that ever disgraced a British colony. Mr M'Nab seconded Mr Wood's nomination. Mr Osborne said that he wished to address the meeting, and to enable him to do so he would propose Mr M'Nab. Mr M'Nab, however, declined to stand, upon which Mr Osborne proposed Mr G-oodwillie, who also declined, but while the written refusal required by law was being prepared, Mr Osborne found time to make a few telling remarks on what he described as the discreditable tactics adopted in the conduct of the nomination by Mr Wood's supporters. Mr Tapper seconded Mr Goodwillie'a nomination, in order, as he said, to enable him to say what he had intended to say, had he been allowed to propose Mr Cuthbertson, as he would have done had he not been forestalled. Mr Tapper dwelt on the necessity of supporting the Ministry who had the success of the Public Works and Immigration scheme at heart, and commended Mr Cuthbertson's business abilities and well-known uprightness and integrity. Mr Cuthbertson then addressed the electors, saying that he was surprised to find that his proposer and seconder considered him a fit and proper person to represent them, as they had hitherto expressedjthemselvesin favor of his opponent. He hoped that they would record the same opinion on the ballot paper that they bad expressed on the hustings. Mr Cuthbertson then referred to the political views previously expressed by him in the Theatre, and offered to answer any questions that might be asked. Mr J. W. Mitchell asked whether Mr Cuthbertson would accept a " billet" if offered one. Mr Cuthbertson said that he supposed Mr Mitchell asked the question because some insinuations regarding his independence had been made use of as an electioneering cry by the other side. He was thankful to say that his circutnI stances were sufficiently comfortable to place him beyond the reach of any temptation of the kind insinuated. Mr Wood addressed the meeting at some length, criticising Mr Cutbbertßon's views and statements, and declaring his utter want of confidence in. the Yogel Government. Mr Wood having replied to several' questions addressed to him by Mr Os. borne and others, a show of hands was taken for each candidate, and pronouaced by the Returning Officer to be in favor of Mr Cuthbertson. A poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Wood by Mr M'Nab and Mr Pratt. MEETING AT WATHOPAI. Mr Cuthbertson addressed a crowded meeting of the electors at the Waihopai Hotel on Wednesday evening. In the course of his address, Mr Cuthbertsou pointed out the real attitude of the Stafford party aa antagonistic to the Public Works scheme, supporting his allegations by copious quotations from Hansard. Mr Osborne occupied the chair, and at the close of the proceedings, a vote of confidence in Mr Cuthbertson was proposed by Mr John Hamilton, seconded by Mr Louis fiodgers, and carried unanimously. THE POLLING DAT. Early yesterday morning, it was apparent that the struggle would be a keen one. The leading supporters on both sides were evidently determined to spare no effort in order to secure the return of their candidate. The usual display of vehicles, placarded with the names and qualifications of the candidates, was not wanting, and they were kept busily employed during the day. Towards afternoon intense interest in the result began to be manifested, as it soon became evident that a larger number of electors would be brought to the poll than had been the case ou any previous occasion. Neither side expected a large majority, and each seemed tolerably confident of success. It is but right to say that notwithstanding the unmistakable intensity of the party feeling which existed, the utmost order and propriety characterised the proceedings throughout the day. By four o'clock, a crowd considerably larger than usually seen on Buch occasions, had gathered in rear of the Courthouse. After some delay, Mr Lawlor, Deputy Returning Officer, mounted the platform, and intimating that he was not then giving the official return, he announced the number polled to be for Mr Cuthbertson ... ... 159 Mr Wood 144 Majority for Mr Cuthbertson 15. The statement was received with vociferous applause, Mr Louis Rodgers, '

an ardent supporter of Mr Cuthbertson, at the same time letting off some fireworks which had been prepared in anticipation of the result of the poll. Mr Cuthbertson, who was received with cheers, then in brief terras thanked the electors. This was the third election which had just been decided in favor of Government supportors, so that he hoped the position of the Ministry would be strengthened, and the country delivered from the evils which the state of evenly balanced parties had caused last session. The battle had been hard fought, and ha was sure that on their part it had been fairly fought. No man's character had been maligned — no man's motives had been misrepresented — and no man's feelings had been wantonly injured It was not a, time for speech-making, so he contented himself with again thanking his supporters and his committee, i Mr Wood remarked that they could ' not always win, and he was^sure no effort had been spared on the part of his supporters to secure his return, not so much from personal as from political motives. Though unsuccessful, the manner in which the election had been conducted made it an honor to those gentlemen and to the district generally. He was glad that on this occasion animosity and slander had been for the most part avoided, so far especially as the two candidates were concerned, and the election had not and -would not make any difference ;to their personal- friendship. After thanking his committee for their exertions, three cheers, which were led off by hia opponent, were given for Mr Wood, and the usual vote of thanks to the returning officer terminated the proceedings.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18730523.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE INVERCARGILL ELECTION., Southland Times, Issue 1744, 23 May 1873

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THE INVERCARGILL ELECTION. Southland Times, Issue 1744, 23 May 1873

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