Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

News and Notes.

Mr Carrutiiers, Premier of'N.S.W., has resigned; owing to ill-health. J. Fuller and Sons have bought His Majesty’s Theatre, Dunedin for £15,000.

Over £15,000 has been raised in Christchurch for a hall for the Young ■Men’s Christian Association.

Between ’4O and 50 men are working on the Riversdale-Switzers line. All the bridge embankments are completed, and the formation will soon be finished.

The cycle race from Warrnamibool to Melbourne was won by Dobie (43 mins) with Oakes (fSO mins) 2nd, and ,Willis (60 rains) 3rd. Oakes has only one arm.

Once more the Gore A. and-P. Association - has advised the Western District that it cannot alter its show date so as not to clash with that of the Western District, which takes place on the Wednesday before the exhibition at Invercargill.

A false alarm. The militia are not to be called out —the Defence Department wants to compile the rolls so that they may know how many men are available.

Food for reflection by housewives. The price of the 4tb loaf has been raised to 7d, and at New Plymouth both bread and meat now cost more than formerly.

“Seeing' oorsels as it hers see us."“I really think that the degenerating influence is the smug content of your people/’ said Mr Ben Tillett, Labour leader, when criticising industrial conditions in New Zealand.

At Manchester, Robert Mark Middle, an aged man, was killed 'by a tram car whilst he was trying to recover his wife's hat, which had been blown olf her head.

While practising for the English Channel swim Thos. Myler, who fought through the Spanish-Ameri-can war, and who hoisted the Stars and Stripes at Santiago de Cuba, was drowned at Courtown in three feet of water.

New Zealand's unions, and especially those connected with the railway service, are up in arms at the suspension of Mr McCullogh of the Christchurch Workshops, for a breach of the rule which prohibits civil servants taking a public part in political movements. He was offered re-instatement if he would g-'ve a written guarantee not to offend again, but this he declined to do.

Thus the Kelso correspondent of the Mataura Knsign in sarcastic mood ;—“lf the Lawrcnce-Roxburgh line does go o n there is no doubt that several hundred thousand train loads of scenery can be exported from the country .between Lawrence and Island Block, but for anything in the shape of produce—fat lambs, w-hdat, oats, turnips, etc. —the prospects may be gauged from the fact that this season 15,000 sheep were turniped in the Crookston and GKnkenich districts, 5000 sacks of oats and 100 tons of chaff were all sent by one firm from Kelso into the fertile lands of scenery, rocks, ferns and rivers."

The Riccarton Hotel, which is generally known as the “Plough Inn," and which is shortly to be pulled down to make room for a new hotel, is one of the landmarks oi Christchurch, for it has stood for nearly fifty years. Avehal, ■ Invercargill, once boasted of a Plough Inn, kept by one Harris, a jovial soul after whom the borough was for many years known as Harrisville. It is still that to old identities. The Plough Inn stood on the site now occupied by McKechnic's store and bakery.

The difference in men. Capt.. McGregor McKenzie, of the steamer Camp Hill, lying at Wellington, had some trouble with his men, worried over it, and connnitted suicide. He .was apparently of less sterner mould than the late Capt. Sewell, once haw bourmastcr at Oamaru. A correspondent of the Otago Daily Times recalls how Sewell arrived at Port Chalmers in 1856 in command of the ship Isabella Hercus. The crew advised him that they did not intend to do any more work, although they could give no reason for their decision. He had them locked up for six weeks, and when the vessel was ready to sail for Hong Kong, they were brought on board again, but still refused duty. “Very well,” said the sturdy Sewell. “I have engaged a shore crew to take the vessef outside the Heads, and when the pilot leaves us the shore crew will also leave. .The ship will then have every stitch

!of canvas set, and you and I will be on board, and if it comes on to blow and you do not choose to shore ten sail I am just as ready to go to h—— as any of you. Put them on boax-d.” What happened? The ship made the quickest passage on recoi’d to Hong Kong ! A tragedy of the sea. The barque Vijking, from Auckland to New York, was struck off Cape Horn by the steel barque Atlas, during a bitterly cold night. While the vessels were interlocked Captain Peterson, of the Viking, called to his crew to save themselves, and they sprang on board the Atlas. Capt. Peterson stayed to help his wife, but she was swept overboard, and he jumped in after her, both perishing. Mrs Pelei'son was a daughter of Mr J. D. Stewart, of Auckland, and was mar ried on May 2nd, just before the Viking left Auckland on what proved to be her last tx’ip.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19071012.2.3

Bibliographic details

News and Notes., Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 25, 12 October 1907

Word Count
862

News and Notes. Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 25, 12 October 1907

Working