Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

HOME CIRCLE

0IS T CE UPON A TIME. Heard I once my old nurse 'telling Stories by the fire at night, JAII about big bearded giants. Till I shivered in affright : Then her voice came from .a distance. From a drowsy far-off clime, Echoing the sweet old cadence, ‘'‘Once upon a tyiife.” Read I once a golden story Of King Arthur’s wonder court, Lancelot and Guinevere, All the Knights of brave report. But amidst the loving, hating, Still I heard the insistent chime. Like a cuckoo clock repeating, ‘‘Once upon a time.’’ SVill our lives when we have lived them Seem like ssdlies we have read ? • Stories which our nurses told us As we lay all snug in bed ? iWill they seem as vague as dreams are, All the days we thought sublime ? .Shall we hear . the faint, low whisper, '“Once upon a time ?” [When the earth and day and sunlight Greyly fade away ; RVhen the years that we have lived here Seem like one brief day ; Shall we hear again at twilight Echo of our nurse’s rhyme, H‘Here you lived and loved and laboured, •“Once upon a time ?” —Selected. LITTLE THINGS ABOUT THE HOUSE. To put wide wicks in lamps or oil stoves thoroughly starch, dry, and iron the wick, and it will slip in ■ easily, without interference with its duty as conductor of oilFlour, sugar, spices, and soda should always be sifted before measuring, unless the recipe says unsifted. The sieving livens and loosens the powders until they double their bulk almost. A fact not generally known is that tea into which a square or spoonful of sugar has been dropped will not Btain the table linens. To enable anyone to take a ring off a swollen finger, take a cupful of Balad oil, put in the finger, allowing [Hie oil to come over the ring, and gently rub the finger up and down. [You will find the swelling go back, and you will be able to draw it off easily. Mildew may be removed by using lemon juice Treely on spots, then place in the sunshine until they disappear.: To remove ink spots, put one or two drops of oxalic acid on the spots and then wash in several waters, lastly in ammonia. A small brush, plenty of soap and [water are the requisites for sparkling glassware. It is said that if stove polish is mixed with turpentine instead of water, it will be very black and glossy, and the polish will be retained longer. To sweeten a room where men have been smoking, remove all cigar or cigarette ends and ashes, and stand a large bowlful of cold water in the room all night, keeping the window slightly open if convenient. The waiter absorbs the odours, so that if in the morning the windows are left open for an hour or two, the room [will be as fresh as >a morning breeze. To dust a room one should not, consumption experts inform us, use a feather duster, because this does not remove the dust from the room, but only brushes it into the air, so that it is inhaled ; or the dust settles and ■the work must be done over again. Soft, dry, cloths should be used, [which are shaken out of the window, or slightly moistened cloths, which may be rinsed out in water’ after using them. '

RECIPES. PARISIAN HARICOT BEANS.— Required : 2 ozs. of butter, coid haricot beans, 2 tablespoonfuls chopped parsley, spoonful of lemon juice, pepper and salt. Melt the butter in a stewpan, throw in cold boiled haricot beans, 2 teaspoonfuls chopped parsley, pepper, and salt, and a spoonful 1 of lemon juice. Toss over the fire until hot and well mixed, then serve.

PRUNE TART.—Required ; \ IT) of pruhes, a little lemon rind, a A*ttle sugar, s'hort paste. Soak the prunes over night, scald them, remove the stones, keep the kernels, and put them with the fruit into a saucepan with a little sugar. Simmer the fruit for ten minutes, pour into a basin, and, when cooled, flavour with, raspberry vinegar or lemon juice. Line a flat dish with pastry, put in the prunes and syrup, cover with pastry and bake in a moderate hot oven.

BACHELOR’ S PUDDlNG,—Required : One egg, its weight in chopped suet, apple, and breadcrumbs, flour, sugar, and currants, a little milk. Chop the suet very finely and rub & into the flour ; add the breadcrumbs and apple. Wash the currants and dry thoroughly ; beat up the egg in a little milk. Mix all the ingredients together, add a littl« powdered mixed spice and boil for two hours and a half in a well-greased mould.

CHEESE CANAPES.—Required ; Slices of stale bread, a little butter, grated cheese, breadcrumbs, pepper and salt. Cut some thin slices of stale bread, stamp them into rounds with a tin cutter, fry in. butter, and cover the top af each with a pile of grated cheese, seasoned with pepper and salt. If the cheese be rich, mix some bread crumbs with it. Set it before the fire in a Dutch oven to dissolve the cheese, and serve very hot on a folded serviette.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19071005.2.3

Bibliographic details

HOME CIRCLE, Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 24, 5 October 1907

Word Count
858

HOME CIRCLE Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 24, 5 October 1907

Working