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Health and BodyBuilding.

(By Physical Guitarist),., SHOULD WE HAVE A MIXED DIET. It is an indisputable fact that the over-indulgence in any one class of foods, to the exclusion of others that are essential, will necessarily prove detrimental. Wo are therefore in favour of a mixed diet. Physiology teaches that a man is omnivorous. The shape and construction of his teeth and digestive apparatus demonstrates that his food is found in the animal, vegetable and mineral kingdom.. The one severe blow to vegetarianism, in the opinion of Dr. G-. B. Warman, lies in the fact that so many persons have espoused the cause without having any knowledge of food values, having dropped meat entirely from their dietry without substituting those vegetables (b plans, peas, lentils), that take the place of meat. Unless these vegetables are eaten in sufficient quantity to furnish the necessary protein (the buildingmaterial) the result will be. a rundown condition of the system, the lack of stamina, decidedly anaemic, and such a one is everlastingly yawning, feeling fatigued. GAN NERVOUSNESS BE CURED. There is distinct hope for those who suffer from that distressing maSady, bad nerves. In fact, it is quite possible, and, indeed, an easy matter, to cure oneself. This is no idle statement, but one confirmed by that splendid athlete and physical culturist, Mr Eustace Miles, who speaks from personal experience. "Until 3 was twenty-five,” says Mr Miles, “1 was shockingly nervous. I .was quite unable to make a speech ; it affected my conversation as well, and it certainly affected all games I participated in. Now I am much better, and what I have achieved is nothing beyond the power of other people.” The secret of the cure practically lies in proper breathing. It is the greatest of all physical helps. Full and deep breathing can scarcely exist side by side with nervousness. Six breaths a minute is good breathing-, but some people do it thirty times a minute. Practise breathing all the time. Do it as much as possible in the open air, and when you are waiting at a crossing take the opportunity to indulge in two or three deep breaths. At the same time it is necessary to relax during the exhalation. Relaxation is almost as important as breaj thing. And this can be done at any time. It is quite possible to relax the muscles, the eyes, the expression, when one is walking along. Then there is another important help in curing nervousness, and that is reason. It is called "suggestion” jin America. Make up your mind [that you will not have anything to ido with nervousness. Reason with j yourself, and tell yourself that it is 1 obviously doing you no good. But treat yourself kindly. Train yourself gradually by self-admonitions, and no one need guess what you are doing-.

: DANGERS OF MEAT TEAS. ' When the tannin of tea or any of the tianno-acids is taken into the system, apart from albuminoid material, it is quickly converted during digestion into glucose and gallic acid, the former being a riseful food substance, and the latter, at any rate, less injurious than the original tannin. If, however, the tannin is taken in conjunction with albuminoid matter —as in that horrible meal dear to the hearts of a certain class of English folk and to many colonials called a “meat tea” —a leathery compound is formed, which takes all the time of a powerful digestion to tackle, and break up into compounds that can be assimilated. In feet, “meat teas” or any other similar combination of albuminoids and tannin mean dyspepsia.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070921.2.13

Bibliographic details

Health and Body-Building., Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 22, 21 September 1907

Word Count
598

Health and Body-Building. Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 22, 21 September 1907

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