Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

CARE OF HORSES.

Upon washing' horses instead of grooming' a correspondent of “The Leader” writes “Washing the legs of horses as it is commonly performed should be condemned. It is not so much the actual washing that should be objected to as it is the fact that the legs are almost invariably left damp. This is a prolific source of inflammation, sometimes running on to the destruction of a portion of the skin, as in cutaneous quitter, erythema, etc. The mud commonly gets the blame, but experience shows it is not the mud, but the washing, aggravated by cold water, which produces these evils. It is becoming: the practice in large establishments not to touch the legs until the mud is thoroughly dry, when it is brushed out in the ordinary manner. If the legs are to be washed, they should be rubbed until they are not only thoroughly dry, but warm. Washing the whole body of the horse is a practice that should bo wholly condemned. The practice of washing destroys the glossy appearance of a wellgroomed animal, besides removing sebaceous material, and subjecting the horse to more danger from the chill. Horses returning from work with wet skin should bo attended to at once. If their coats were perfect-

ly dried at this time, care taken to prevent chill and the proper clothing furnished when needed, many of the ills that horse flesh is heir to would be avoided.”

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070817.2.10.3

Bibliographic details

CARE OF HORSES., Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 18, 17 August 1907

Word Count
241

CARE OF HORSES. Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 18, 17 August 1907

Working