Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., JULY 20. General News.

Mr 'A. J. Service, County Clerk and Treasurer, advertises a list of proposed rates to be made by the Southland County Council on thj 9th of August, 1907. The latest advice on the subject of the Invercargill tramways is the following telegram from Sir J. G. Ward :—“I have definitely decided to go on with the tramways, and the work will be gone on with without delay.” Another way of saying—“Thei’e’s a good time coming, boys, if you’ll only wait a little longer.”

The Southland Champion Ploughing Match takes place on Mr T. Frazer’s farm, Waianiwa, on Wednesday, 7th August, 1907. Entries must be in the hands of the Secretary not later than Saturday, 3rd August.

The Invercargill Borough Council has agreed to the framing of a bylaw requiring cyclists to pay a license fee of 2s Gd per year.

It is six years since the fatal rocket explosion at the corner of Tay .and Bee streets.

Tenders close on Monday next for the erection of two brick fives-courts for the Southland Roys’ and Girls’ High School Board. Mr C. H. Roberts', the architect, can supply full particulars.

A subscriber wants to know when the Orepuki shale works are going to make another start. Me are Sony it is not within our proving to tell him. But let him exercise laith and patience. There s a big future foi the Golden West.

On and after the 28th August several rural sections in the Waik-awa district will be open for sale or selection at the Land office, Invercargill. The land is situated' about eight miles from Waikawa, and is covered with mixed bush, principally red pine.

The Rev. A. Mitchell conducts'both services in St. Raul s [Methodist Church on Sunday next. The evening subject is on 'Timely Topics—‘‘ls There The Rev. Mr A. Mcßean preach. *s at South Invercargill and .Woodlands.

The timber trade in the Orepuki district is booming just now. The Southland Sawmilling Co. intend removing their engine to Te Tua shortly. Austin's mill at Waihoaka is to bo removed to a new bush area shortly, unfortunately further away front the railway. Coming nearer home. Messrs More and Sons, the timber kings of Riverton, have completed their iron-rail tramway, and the loco, will shortly be running. The distance is seven miles, and the cost of laying estimated at about it 14,000. That's enterprise.

One of the most popular men in the railway service has come out from among the bachelors, and taken unto himself a wife. We refer to Mr T. E. Haughety. Tie was met .by his coworkers, and received several presentations and tendered a banquet. The presentation was made by Mr Wilson, stationmaster. and consisted of a handsome clock and a pair of vases. Messrs A. T. Tunis, traffic inspector, and W. .T. Robertson, coaching foreman, also endorsed the remarks. We trust the happy couple may long be spared to hear the signal “All dear on the main line.”

The Financial Statement was delivered by Sir ■I. (I. Ward on Tuesday night. Fcaling with the Tariff, he stated that changes would he made that would represent the sum o'f £-254,000. The most notable item is the removal oi the duty on sugar, which last year yielded £204,2 78. The duty on certain fruits will also he abolished after the 81st of October. The impost on dour nml potatoes remains. As to the land cpiestion, the Government intend to increase the graduated tax against holders of land of the unimproved value of £4O- - and over, but large landowners will find consolation in the fact that the sheep tax, which totalled £20,000 last year. is to be abolished. Only a portion of the unsold Crown lands will now be taken for endowments, and the holders of leases-in-perpetuity are to have tde option of the freehold at a price to be fixed by arbitration. The immigration of the Chinese is also to receive attention. the Government proposing to substitute an educational test instead of the poll-tax now in force.

The position of the Invercargill staff is still undecided. The Gas and Wafer Committee recommend that the engineer and staff receive notice of the termination of their engagement. The Council referred the recom.rnendation back to the Committee. The latter, unable to decide whether the Council desired an inquiry or not, as requested by the engineer, brought the matter before the Council again on Thursday evening, when the clause >n the Committee’s report dealing with the matter was rejected. It is> still wsthon the province of the Council to make recommendations re the staff, or for the Council to order an in<Tiiry. Cr. Bain stated that the object of the Committee in the first instance was to bring about the amalgamation of the G a s and Waterworks staffs.

Owing to want of space several reports a r e crowded out of this issue.

Captain Gardiner, late of Birchwood, died at his residence, Spey st., on Friday morning. The deceased gentleman w T as one of the old school of runholders, and one of the straightest sportsmen that ever rode on the saddle —a straight goer in every sense of the word. A ■ man of genial disposition, and one who will be very much missed by a large circle of friends.

Mails for Australia and the United Kingdom close at Invercargill at 1.45 p.m. on Monday, and for South Africa at 12.55 p.m. on Wednesday-

Messrs Mackenzie and Wilson, architects, invite tenders for the erection of a house in Gladstone. Ten ders close on the 23rd inst. Messrs F. W. McGill and Co., the enterprising Gladstone storekeepers, find their present store too small, and in this issue Mr C. J. Brodrick, architect, invites tenders for a twostorey brick building. Tenders close on 25 th inst.

The annual statement of accounts for the Borough of Campbell town appear in another column.

Special services will be conducted in the Army Barracks all day Sunday.

Realising that more paddock accommodation will some day bo required at the abattoirs-, the Invercargill Council has bought 27 acres there for £B6O.

A very successful conversazione and dance in aid, of the funds of &t. Mary’s choir was held i,n \ ictoria Hall on Wednesday last. One and all voted it a most enjoyable evening's amusement, and were loud in their praise of the way the affair was managed.

The annual gathering of the Invercargill corps of the Salvation Army in connection with the social work of the organisation was held in the barracks on Wednesday evening, and attracted a large 'attendance. His Worship the Mayor presided, and in a short opening address referred to the splendid work being done by the Army throughout the world. Addresses were given by Mr C. S. Longuet. the Rev. R. Raine, and StaffCaptain Dixon, and songs were contributed by Miss Lumsden and the Rev. A. Mitchell and members of the local corps, the meeting being bright and interesting from beginning to end. Some persons imagine that the need for help from the various agencies of the Army arises in the large .centres of population, but that is not so—cases of distress occur everywhere, in. Invercargill as elsewhere, and only recently there were three

instances in which persons who had fallen on the evil days had reason to lee thankful that the Army is in existence. The annual booklet issued in ! connection with the rescue of the | Army is one of the most pathetic pieces of literature we have ever , read, dealing as it docs with the fallen and the unfortunate. It lias howlever, its bright side in the recital of the good work done in boys’ homes, ! maternity homes, prison gfile homes and many other agencies for the reI lief and uplifting of the sad and |.sorrowful. After reading it one can easily understand why thousands have reason to thank God that General .Booth was inspired to set on foot his world-wide Society. Xearly 8000 men, women, anti children in i, the Cofnmonwcalth and N.Z:. are proj vided for every day in the Houses and Shelters, 500 persons are activej l.v engaged in the various Fescue agencies, and after observing the strictj est economy the annual sum involved is over £63,000, every penny of I which is account 'd for in yearly balance sheets.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070720.2.16

Bibliographic details

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., JULY 20. General News., Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 14, 20 July 1907

Word Count
1,392

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., JULY 20. General News. Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 14, 20 July 1907

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working