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AT HOME AND ABROAD

At the last meeting of the Queenstown Magistrate’s Court J. Plato was charged at the instance of the Southland Education Board’s inspector with failing to send two or three of his children to the Convent school. Defendant admitted the irregular attendance of his children, and stated that it was unavoidable, as he was sometimes absent from home all day. ■The Magistrate said that he was not sure that he had any jurisdiction in regard to children attending private schools. The Southland Education Education Board w r ould require to satisfy itself in the meansime that it was within its rights in bringing action against the parents (whose children attended the Convent or other private schools. He was prepared to hear argument next Court day and then give his decision.

It is reported that Mr J. Kennedy has disposed of his Drummond farm to Mr G. D. Newman, Invercargill, the price paid being £l4 per acre. It is understood that Mr Newman recently came into a legacy of £B,OOO.

By a fire at Eltham ten business places were destroyed ; loss, £6,000.

At the Anglican Synod, Wellington, the Rev. A. E. Worsley moved “That this Synod deprecates the association of dancing with any method adopted for raising funds for the work of the church turoughout the diocese. The Rev. 11. J. Deane seconded. The Rev. C. C. Harper moved ■“That this Synod pass on to to the next order of the day,’’ and this was Carried on the voices.

The Timaru Borough Council has accepted the offer of the A.M.P. Society of a loan of £50,000 for drainage at 4£ per cent, for 50 years), the loan to be spread over 4 years,) and a sinking fund at J per cent, to be provided.

In dealing with a number of cases of cycling on footpaths at Timaru Mr C. A. Wray, S.M., said that let-ter-carriers were the worst offenders in this way ; they seemed to think the footpaths were made for them. ■'Yes,” said the Inspector, ‘‘and women and girls are just as bad.” As to the carriers, we think they might be excused, in view of the nature of their business, a nd the many miles they have to cover in a few hours. Mrs Coakley’s hotel at Otautau is ,to be re-built in brick.

At the inquest as to the death of Mr H. Norman, of Papatotara, the jury found that he met his death by falling under the train at Hirst’s siding, on Thursday, July 4th, there being no evidence to show how he got there, and no blame attached to anyone.

The championship at the Drummi and ploughing match was won by Mr John Turnbull, and at Wrey’s Bush by Mr J a s. Turnbull.

So far, seven entries have been received for the second-class bands’ contest at Ashburton on October 9th and 10th. The Invercargill Y.M.C.A. band is among the entrants.

An important point w a s raised in the preliminary hearing of a libel action brought by Florence Isabella Hall, of Masteryon, against the New Zealand Times, claiming £2OOO damages. One of the interrogatories demanded the name of the paper’s informant. Judge Cooper said that as the paper was prepared to take the responsib.lity he must hesitate to order it to disclose its authority. Eventually, he took time to consider the point, and then ruled that the name of the informant need not bo given.

At the last meeting' o- the Timaru school committee, attention was drawn to the danger of children being run over by cyclists, as they were leaving school just as cyclists were hurrying home from shops and factories for dinner. One membei suggested that the school should be dismissed say five minutes before noon, to give the children time to disperse before the scores of cyclists reached the vicinity of the school- It was agreed to pass on the suggestion to the headmaster. One of those days there will be a tragedy in Invercargill—the way that cyclists use the footpaths, especially in the suburbs, is bound to end in disaster.

Mr Deakin, the Premier of the Australian Commonwealth, is ill. After surviving all the dissipations incidental to the Premier’s Conference in London it is hard luck to be laid aside by illness soon after returning to Australia..

The Railway Commissioners of New South Wales are installing a locomotive building plant, and start by building ten engines.

A prominent publican at Bathurst with a n interest in three hotels, who is supporting the no-license movement, declares that five years’ experience of the trade has convinced h,m that in any phase the liquor traffic is a scourge to the community. Public institutions need constant supervision. Dr. Springthorpc, one of the official visitors to the Melbourne lunatic asylum found 30 poor, feeble patients at Yarra Bend without a fire (although the temperature was down to 48 degrees) because the fire places were not safe to use.

A woman who would fall asleep anywhere while walking about or even eating her meals, was described at an inquest at the London Coroner’s Court on Mary Aon Dabbs, fifty-six, who, it was found, died from heart failure. The husband stated that his wifehad had become terribly stout, and as a result would sleep morning, noon, and night. She would dose off at her breakfast, or while undressing, and sometimes she would get out of bed, walk across the room, and then fall asleep. She had br Q ken a tr a y of crockery by dropping it through, falling asleep. Early one morning he found her lying on the floor, having apparently gone to sleep and fallen over the coal scuttle.

The mysterious disease which threatens to exterminate bees in the Isle of Wight is referred to in the annu a l report of the Hants a nd Isle of Wight Beekeepers’ Association. “ Twentyfive years’ acquaintance with bees, bee-men, and bee literature,” says the report, ‘‘has not revealed anything quite so deadly and mysterious as this so-called bee paralysis. To the bee expert it is as terror inspiring as is anthrax to the cattle man ; and should it spread over England as it has over the Isle of Wight, there will be no need for bee speieties —as there will be no bees. The Board of Agriculture has sent a Cambridge scientist to the Isle of Wight to study the question-” ‘T could not give him sufficient (food), but I gave him what 1 could. I often wont without myself to give to him,” said the wife of Richard Henry Edwards, on whose body an inquest was held at Shoreditch. Edwards, a labourer, had been out of work for sixteen months, and suffered from rheumatism. lie drowned himself in the Regent’s can a lA hint for the Invcrcargifl Council. In regard to the issue by the London County Council of a brochure giving hints on fire protection. Captain A. W. C. Shean, of Finsbury circus, states that for some time he has been issuing a card containing advice to households in case of fire. J

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070713.2.25

Bibliographic details

AT HOME AND ABROAD, Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 13, 13 July 1907

Word Count
1,181

AT HOME AND ABROAD Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 13, 13 July 1907

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