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Draughts.

1 Invercargill Ohess and Draughts \ Club is now in full swing, and a / very pleasant evening on Wednesday, the room being well filled. Some very interesting play took place, everyone thoroughly enjoying themselves. Some more new members came forward, and one or two old faces were also again smiling over the board. The club intend to publish one or two of the most interesting games played, and members are requested to send any games or endings of exceptional interest to the secretary. Solutions to problems are invited. The following is an interesting ending of a game played between M. O'Byrne, and F. Hutchins Black 3 6 7 10 and 14 ; King 24.

White 12 13 15 16 19 21 and 30

White to move and win.

An interesting' and instructive

study for beginners

The love of the game of draughts by its 'devotees is frequently the cause of comment, and surprise is often expressed at it by non-players. Many who have explored little across the old "Dambrod,” wonder what a man can see in this pastime that places it above others as a recreation for winter evenings. The answ r er is that it affords more change, more variation, than almost any other form of amusement- Two men can sit down in friendly rivalry, and can play game after game, even confining themselves to only one of the numerous openings, continue the play for months, and different positions and endings with exquisite combinations are unfolded and developed every time. No two games are exactly alike. It takes some little time and trouble to learn a little of the openings and to grasp the finer points in the g-ame, but this time and trouble is amply repaid in the pleasure and profit resulting, not only for a season, but for a lifetime, for when once a man advances past the novice stage in draughts he has a recreation that he does not tire of, and that will last him to old age. When he tires of other joys he will turn to the checker board, and seek solace and comfort in his advancing years.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070420.2.31

Bibliographic details

Draughts., Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 3, 20 April 1907

Word Count
354

Draughts. Southern Cross, Volume 15, Issue 3, 20 April 1907

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