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The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., MAR. 30th. General News.

Dr. Stainer’s sublime musical meditation “The Crucifixion,” will bo given in the Wesleyan Church on Good Friday night at eight o’clock. Mr J. E. Taylor will conduct, and Mr R. Trist Searell will preside at the organ. ‘'‘The Story of the Cross” will also be rendered. Admission is free ; offertory for choir funds. In a note to the editor, Mr T. Howard, of “The Castle,” Waihoava . (near Orepuki), remarks :—“ I am bush-telling 35 acres just now in the best of weather. It is a “dandy” season—the best I have seen for t l 7 vears.”

The complete list of train arrangements for Easter appears in another column. The public cannot complain of lack of train service, and the arcangements appear to have been well planned out, and should give general satisfaction. The Southland section is the largest in the colony, and it speaks well for the heads of the department that they are able to give the whole district such facilities in regard to train-travelling.

Specially attractive services are announced for Easter at the Leet street Wesleyan Church. At the evening service Miss Trapwell, of Dunedin, will sing the grand sacred Bong—- " Nearer my God to Thee.” The choir will render the Easter Meditation, "The Story of the Cross,” and "They have taken away my Lord.” 'All are invited.

In this issue Mr T. A. Cushen announces that he intends to stand for Mayor of the borough of South Invercargill. Mr Cushen is not a novice, and is thoroughly conversant with municipal working. He takes a keen interest in all matters appertaining to the welfare of the borough he having been a resident there for some twenty years. As a further proof of his ability it might be mentioned that Mr Cushen has been a member of the South School committee for some time, and taken a hand in the management of the affairs scholastic.

Mr W. B. McKay, who has resigned the town clerkship of North Invercargill after twenty years’ service, has heen presented with a handsome illuminated address, in the course of which the mayor and councillors state -.—“ While fully recognising and highly appreciating the services you have rendered to the borough as- its executive officer, we would take this opportunity of expressing our esteem and regard for your character as l a man of high principle, scrupulous integrity, and utter impartiality in all your actions. We ask your acceptance of this address as a memento of our goodwill, and express the hope that in your retirement you and your esteemed wife may enjoy many years of unalloyed happiness.

Mr W. B. Scandret (the present mayor.) announces in our advertising columns that at the request of a good many citizens he has promised to be a candidate for re-election to the mayoralty. Mr Scandrett has bom connected in one way or another with the corporation since 1871, and must of necessity be a useful man to the community all round. During the past tw r o years he has had a good deal to do with the completion of the Town Hall and theatre, and if one can gather from the number of companies that visit Invercargill, the theatre has met the demand that was anticipated by those supporters of the proposal, and will likely eventually cost the town nothing.

Mr McCarthy, S.M., when dealingon Monday with two cases of drunkenness at Waikiwi, where the depots are, said ; "I will take this public opportunity of stating that the existence of these depots, carrying oil the class of trade they do, without practically any regulation whatever, is a menace to the peace and order of the community.”

In connection with the death of Miss Howell at Master! on some months ago, and the subsequent exhumation of her body for the purpose of analysis, the police department states that the analysis 1 disclosed traces of zinc poisoning.

We learn that the office-bearers' of St. Fauhs Presbyterian Church, in Dee street-, have acquired the leasehold section, at present occupied by Mr A. Dunlop’s blacksmith shop, and intend erecting a new Sunday school. The church has been badly in need of a Sunday school, and this is a step in. the right 'direction. It will be a decided improvement to the corner, as the old ‘'smithy” is one of Invercargill’s old land marks, and has served its day very well in-deed. The pastor (Rev. Geo. Lindsay) has received a call to Dunedin, but seeing that the church is flourishing to such an extent under his spiritual guidance, it would be almost a pity for him to think of leaving.

Mr W. A. McCaw, the progressive ■director of technical instruction, announces in this issue that students ■will be enrolled during the week, and that syllabuses will be issued on Thursday next, and may be obtained free. It is thought than a record entry will be secured this-year as the residents of the town are beginning to recognise the good work resulting from the classes.

The annual election of school committees in Southland takes place on Monday, 22nd April. , Nominations must be sent in in writing not later than eight o’clock on Monday, 15th April.

Mails for Australia, India, and Mauritius close at Invercargill, at 8 a.m. on-Monday, and for South Africa at 12.55 p.m. on Wednesday.

The cable received from London by the managers of the Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corporation, announces that the revenue for 1906 reached the large sum of £1,117,385 —that although the claims paid were very heavy the year ended with assets amounting to £1,623,439.

The local Christian Endeavour Societies have arranged a comprehensive programme for Good Friday. It comprises six meetings, the first being a prayer meeting in the Don street Primitive Methodist Church at 7 a.m. There will be a luncheon at 12.30 noon, an open-air gathering at 6.30 p.m., and a public meeting in the Victoria Hall at 7.30 p.m., when the subject of "Christian Citizenship” will be spoken on by Messrs J. J. Wesney and Mr S. C. McDonald. Musical items will also be given. The programme is advertised in this issue.

If there is one thing more than another that Invercargill is in need of it is urinal conveniences. A town of this size should certainly be better supplied. The town council have recognised this fact, and one day this week when passing Messrs Walker and Sons’ Victoria Foundry, we wei'o pleased to note that an additional one was in course of construction. It stands about ten feet high, and is of ornamental pattern, and no doubt the council will add several more in different parts of the town. In fact, it is the council’s first duty to ratepayers to see that there is a proper supply of these conveniences. Looking through the foundry, we- found Messrs Walker and Sons’ staff busy building their serviceable ranges and pretty “Victoria’’ grates, which are finding so much favour locally- In verandah work and railings or ornamental fences they are in a position to turn them out at short notice at reasonable prices.

In the Supreme Court case, W. J. Moffett v. J. B. Welsh, claim for £399 for breach of agreement to purchase an hotel at Riverton. His Honour Mr Justice Williams has found for Welsh. After the agreement was signed defendant was unable to obtain a transfer of the license, and advised the plaintiff, and determined the agreement. He counterclaimed against Moffett for £SO deposit paid, and the judge found that he was entitled to have this refunded.

It is reported that the runholders in the Upper Shotovcr district are making strenuous efforts to kill the rabbits this season. Even Chinamen have been employed on one run to swell the brigade of destruction.

From the Wakatipu Mail we learn that a party of some thirty Foresters, amongst whom was Bro. J. G. Butler, a man of 70 years, and a member of the Order for fifty - three years, climbed Ben Lomond on Sunday last, and greatly enjoyed tnc view of the surrounding country from there. While on the top the party gave the Forester’s fire, sang “Onward, Christian Soldiers,” proposed the health of the King, and lastly sang “Homo, Sweet Home.”

The Arbitration Court at Sydney has withdrawn the right to preference to Unionists from the Coal Lumpers’ Union. The president, in granting the withdrawal of preference from the union, said the men had clearly disregarded the intention of the award, and employers should be relieved of the hampering provision of preference to unionists, which prevented employers to a great extent defending themselves.

Mr James Walker, who lately returned from a visit to the North, informs the Wyndham Parmer that except for occasional patches of verdure, like oases in a desert, there was very little growth to be seen between Gore and Balclutha, and again from Waikouaiti right through to Canterbury as far as Christchurch. Little or no turnip or other winter feed was to be seen ; but thanks to the moist warmth of the back end of the season, the grass was beginning to assume a green tinge. He saw and heard of evidences of potato blight all along the journey, and very poor returns from this staple crop were being anticipated. Not so in Invercargill. A local firm are quoting potgtoes at from £3 a ton, while another declares the market glutted.

The Rev. H. T. Blair, of Waikaka, has accepted a call to Orepuki.

Southland School Cadets to the number of 240 left for the Exhibition on Tuesday.;

Owing to 'Monday being a holiday Starr-Bowkett Building Society subscriptions will be received on Wednesday, 3rd April.

Railway workshops employes will be pleased to learn that Mr J. A. Hanan, M.H.R., of Invercargill, has been instrumental in obtaining two extra days' leave for those wishing to visit the Christchurch Exhibition.

The Southland Caledonian Society received no reply from King, the disqualified winner of the £2O handicap, showing cause why that amount should be paid over to him, and has awarded the prize to Baty, who ran second.

It is computed that the fines inflicted on the strikers at the various Canterbury freezing works must aggregate about £I4OO, of which the Belfast and Islington men have paid about £7OO.

Lord Plunket has arranged a tour through Central Otago, commencing on April 16th. He first goes up the Otago lino, and has mapped out a programme to occupy about a week. Leaving Queenstown (on April 26th) he goes to Kingston by boat ; Kingston to Luinsden by rail, stopping at Garston, Lowther, and Athol. On April 27th his Excellency leaves Luinsden for Invercargill, stopping at Dipton, Limehills, Winton, Makarewa, and Waikiwi. Doubtless, visits to Wyndhaxn, Mataura, and Gore, amongst other places, will be made on the return journey.

The road between Balclutha and Kaitangata, at the place where a buggy containing George Sandilands, his wife and child, backed into' the Molyneux on the 20th inst., is> to be fenced. At one time there was a stone wall there, but it was gradually destroyed by larrikins. Had it had left intact three lives would probably have been saved. In spite of a diligent search, no trace of the victims has been found. Xot a hat or the tiniest scrap of wearing apparel was borne by the tideless flood to where it could be seen of human eye. There is (adds the Free Press) something positively uncanny in the thought, of three human beings being thus so completely obliterated. But the Molyneux is a mysterious stream, and holds many secrets.

Since early youth, Mr E. B. Jones, chemist, of this town, has always had 1 a taste for manufacturing, and has been instrumental in introducing a number of first-class preparations for the benefit of fellow-beings. One of his preparations, now so well and favourably known throughout the land, is honey pectoral. This valuable medicine has proved a boon and a blessing - , and it is not to be wondered at when we say the sales have far exceeded 'Mr Jones’s expectations. He has had a wide experience in his own special line —that of manufacturing—and is a busy man. Mr Jones holds that there is a great deal of suffering in the world that could — with a little forethought—be avoided, and with a view to further assistingnature in the performance of her duties, he has produced a medicine specially useful for ladies: It is not a patent medicine, but a genuine mixture, and should commend itself to all right-thinking people. Ladies will find it to their interest to read Mr Jones’s advertisement in this week’s ‘''Southern Cross.’’

’A fine young fellow named Arthur Humphries, son of Mr Humphries, of Charlton, was killed at Mataura on Sunday, last. He left in a drag, along with ten others, to drive to Fortrose, and when crossing a bridge something - startled the horses, and they bolted. After going - some disrfiance a wheel collapsed, and the drag struck the kerbing. The 'deceased looved out from the bock' of the vehicle and was dashed against the corner of a house. He staggered to his feet, but fell ag'ain, and died a few minutes later, his skull having been fractured. At the inquest the driver, C. J. Humphries (cousin of the deceased) stated that the horses were startled by some loose planks in the bridge. There was a brake on the drag, but it was inconvenient to use—the boot step was far under the seat, and had to be pulled out by hand. There was a ten-g>allon keg of beer on the drag, taut it was untouched, and there had been no drinking. W. Trembath, owner of the drag - , said there was nothing peculiar about the brake. The driver had only to lift his foot to put it on. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., MAR. 30th. General News., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 52, 30 March 1907

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2,310

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., MAR. 30th. General News. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 52, 30 March 1907

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