Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Old Time Echoes.

PIONEERS OF GOLD-DREDGING

The story of the origin of gold, dredging in New Zealand is told ns by Captain Hosking, of the Commonwealth Mine. In 1863, the Captain and his five mates were working alluvial ground at Teviot, now cadod Roxborough, about 200 miles from/ the Molyneux. They knew that the bed of the river carried good gold, but the rises in the river were so frequent as to debar them from working it. On one occasion they were able to wade in up to their belts and pick up with their shovels good wash. They were not rich men, and roast beef anti goose seemed to stare them in the face from this out, for they were able to earn £lO per week per man.

But one night the snow waters came down and the river at this point rose 26ft., within two feet of their hut. They were naturally reluctant to leave the place, and it was while their minds were being severely exercised in this respect that they launched out in a scheme which the Captain believes to be the origin, primitive as it. was, of the great machine dredges which are now doing good work even on our own river the Macquarie. They bought an old boat and patched it up. This they moored in mid-stream, and with a bag made of sheepskin and a mouth-ring, held down to the bottom by the biggest man with a heavy manuka pole or spear, they dredged the river from the shore by the windlass which dragged the bag along the bottom. They did very well, and other parties came along and improvements with them ; for, the idea having been sug-g-eGed, development, as in all such cases, hurried along. The first, party to keep the Captain’s party company introduced a punt with a windlass attached, and following on this dedevelopment came the stern - wheel punts. —Wellington Times, N.S.W.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070323.2.5

Bibliographic details

Old Time Echoes., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 51, 23 March 1907

Word Count
322

Old Time Echoes. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 51, 23 March 1907

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working