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Valedictory.

A social and gathering was held at the Glen Dhu Timber Co.'s mill on March 2nd, alien the employes met to say farewell to the late manager, Mr G. Anderson, who is leaving the employ of the company to take over the management of three largo mills in the North Island. 'Mr J. 'Faulkner, senr., in a few well-chosen words, made known the feelings of himself and fellow-workers towards Air Anderson. He said he had known Air Anderson for the last thirty years, had worked for him three times, and his three sons had each worked for him twice. During all these years he had proved, through all circumstances. to act like a gentleman in every sense of the word. He might have his faults, tut ho had one good property which counterbalanced all his faults—he had a kind heart towards his fellow man in the hour of trouble. Air Faulkner closed bl reciting the following lines of his own composition ; He is going to leave us, and I know we'll miss him. Though my talk to him has been sometimes rude.He is going to leave us, and' I know we'll miss him. The friend of all, and a neighbour go o d. But. we hope he'll prosper in the land up yonder, 6 And be always free from toil and care. “God bless his family and keep them happy." Is the humble author’s earnest prayer. Air Faulkner then asked Air Anderson to accept a small token of the men's esteem for him, in the shape of a gold locket, suitably inscribed, and assured Air Anderson that the best wishes of all went with the gift. Songs and recitations were given by the company, prominent among whom were Alessrs Faulkner ami Shadforth. The former brought down the house with recitations of his own composition, while the latter kept all in good humour with his coon songs and eccentricities. Alessrs BrOwn. senior and junior, contributed several songs, as did also Alessrs Smith, Faulkner, and Afyhill. The company was well-pleased with Airs •J. Anderson's Scotch readings as well as the g-ood old-time Songs which she rendered very sweetly in fact, the whole company joined together to make the evening a very enjoyable one. Air Anderson, in reply to the chairman's remarks, said he was very pleased to say he was thoroughly at home with the men in his employ. He thanked the men very much for the token of their goodwill towards him. He said that being so long connected with the sawmilling industry in Southland it was a bit of a wrench to break away from old ties. But he hoped to do better for his family in the larger circle to which he was moving, and it was his duty to do his best for them. Ho considered a man who treated his workmen well was always treated well by them in return, and the boss who tried to bounce the men got the least work out of them. For his own part he always endeavoured to treat his men as he would like to be treated himself, and found he could always get an. extra lift out of them for it, if it were needed. All present then joined hands, and sang "Auld Lang Syne." Three cheers for Mr Anderson and three for the ladies ,who provided the good things closed a very enjoyable evening.

'Rockefeller, the Standard Oil magnate, has devoted ten millions sterling to the establishment of unsectarian schools in China, in the 'belief that education must precede conversion to new beliefs.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070323.2.34

Bibliographic details

Valedictory., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 51, 23 March 1907

Word Count
596

Valedictory. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 51, 23 March 1907

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