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Western District Notes.

THE CROPS. TURNIPS A RECORD CROP. FEED PLENTIFUL. THE STRIKE A BLESSING IN DISGUISE. ••DENIS” ADVISED TO GO RABBITING. BLIGHT IN POTATOES. The fine weather experienced for some time changed to a soft rain on Sunday last, and it has continued •'muggy” since. It has brought harvesting to a standstill, and unless we get some drying winds it is very doubtful if anything will be done this week.

At present harvesting is at all stages, some farmers having still some cutting to do, others just making a start to stack, while others again have finished up, and no doubt are congratulating themselves, seeing the turn the weather has taken. But this season is not a late one yet, and a week'or so of fine weather would sec the bulk of the grain safely stacked, as it is not a long job this season, the bulk of the crops being light. In fact, in a great many cases the whole of the material will be wanted for home consumption, so I don’t think there is the slightest fear of prices coming back. If they do drojj a'shade they are sure to rise again as the season advances Turnips are making rapid growth, and now promise to be exceptional—in fact, it can be safely predicted that it will lie a record season for turnips. I see Mr William Mollison, of Limestone Plains has a magnificent crop of swedes.

On all hands feed is plentiful —indeed grass is growing at a marvellous rate, so that under the circumstances the slaughtermens’ strike will be no serious matter. In fact, I think it would prove a blessing if the works were to stop killing lambs for the balance of the season, as it would allow the stocks to increase. The present system of killing our owe iambs is making it more difficult every year to get a decent lino of ewes, and if things go on much longer as at present it is hard to say where we will end.

Rabbiting is the order of the day now, and as this has been a fine season for •‘bunny” good hauls are being made. I believe we will bo able to keep the works going for a considerable time. I would advise ‘‘Denis’’ to try his hand at rabbiting, seeing he could not stand up to the slaughtering. Ho will find it so much easier although the hours are long, and he will have no difficulty in making his 25s a night, as I believe 6d a paii - is being paid ; and an amateur can easily catch 50 pairs per night. I shall be pleased to hear if Denis ta'kfcs up this proposal. • So far, Mr Editor, I haven't said anything about big oranges (potatoes), but I hear the blight is very bad in the Waiau and Orepuki districts, and 1 have seen evidences of it in other parts myself, so it is very iafti’d to say how these will turn out. March i3th. • ’

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070316.2.23

Bibliographic details

Western District Notes., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 51, 16 March 1907

Word Count
501

Western District Notes. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 51, 16 March 1907

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