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The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., MARCH 2. General News.

Home, Australian, and American mails close at Invercargill at 12.35 p.m. on Monday. Supplementary; mails will be despatched at the same hour on Tuesday.

A conference was held on Thursday between Mr J. McQueen, manager of the Southland Frozen Moat Co. and a committee representing the slaughtermen 021 strike. The company offered the existing rate, and to pay a hig'her one if the court awarded it, to date from the time of resuming work, but the men adhered to the demand for 25s per hundred, and the meeting ended without result. The company are naw advertisi'ng fpr slaughtermen and learners 1 . Steps aro to be taken to form a union in Southland. At Wellington the charge against the slaughtermen for breach of industrial agreement was 'dismissed owing to a technical error. The Government are to be commended for their prompt action in having the burnt areas sown over in grass. The work has been in hand for some time, and altogether it is expected that close on 1500 acres will require treatment. On Wednesday last a number of men were started to work to the eastward of Waimatua. The work, in Iho meantime is being supervised by Mr J. Cplliiis, Government forest ranger, and it would be hard to get a better 2nan, because he takes a keen interest in the work of his department, and has a thorough knowledge of the land- Ttie Government can rest assured that their generous movement will bo appreciated, and that the seed will be sown to the best advantage. Great hopes are entertained that luxuriant crops of gbass will be yielded from these patches. Messrs Evans and Lindsay aro hand at work on the Avenal endowment, and ab,out., another week should see the whole of it well sown. The Corporation workman, Mr Fox, is supervising.

The work in connection with the erection of the troopers’ memorial at the corner of Tay and Dee sts., commenced on Friday, and the monument should be in place in a week or two.

The carters hold their second annual picnic at One Tree Point on Wednesday next. Given a fine day there should be a large attendance. Everything possible is being done to make the outing enjoyable. Any further particulars may be had from Mr A. 'A. Paape, the secretary.

The contract for building the sea wall round the A. and P. Society’s new show’ ground has been let to Mr ■W. Baird, and this week he made a start at the north-west corner, and is already making good progress with the work.

Southlanders, and particularly the residents of Invercargill, will be pleased to hear of the success of one of our boys. We learn that Mr R. J. McKay, son of Mr R. B. McKay, a respected citizen of this town, has been appointed Demonstrator in the School of Engineering at Canterbury College. Mr McKay is fully qualified for the position, and has shown considerable talent from early youth—in fact, he may be termed a chip off the old block. As a pupil of the South School he took a board scholarship to the high school, and from there passed to the university witßi honours, and studied engineering. It is gratifying to hear of his success. We wish Mr McKay every prosperity in the future, which looks very promising indeed.

We wish to draw at tent i orr to the ‘Autumn Flower Show, whi<fh takes place on Wednesday and Thursday, 6tih and 7th, in the Zealandia Hall. The Society have done everything to make the show a great success, and as we have had a wonderful season there is every reason to expect that this show will eclipse all others. The Society draw the attention of amateur growers to the class for pot plants. This section has not had the support of the growers it should have. It is not that there is not the material here to make a good display, for we have only to look .at the windows of the homos of Invercargill, and we will find that there are enotigh pot plants grown in them to fill the Zealandia Hall, and most of them well up to show form. We think that this -only requires mentioning to ladies who go in for windowgardening, and they will roll up with their plants and help to make the show a greater and more interesting success than it is. The following are the classes set apart for amateur pot plant growers :—2 fuchsias, 2 pelargoniums, 2 maidenhair ferns, 2 ferns (any sort), 4 pot plants (any sort), 2 tuberous begonias, 1 hanging basket. Entries close Monday, 4th. The stations along the Seaward Busih line, recently destroyed by fire, are being replaced. At present the carpenters are at work on the Tisbury station, and timber is on the ground at Waimatua. The residents appreciate the benefit derived from these shelter sheds, especially when waiting for the trains during wet weather. The leases of six pastoral runs in Southland were offered at the land office on Thursday, and were all secured by the present holders —Messrs Helder and Awdry (Takitimo), Pinckney (Waikaia), E. Macdonald (Athol) trustees of the late Capt. Stevens (Wairaki), C. Hanson (TCapuka), and Studholme Bros. (Blackmount). All the runs were secured at the present upset, except the one at Atihol, for which Mr Macdonald has to pay £-106 a year instead of £45 as before. On the western side of the railway line below Gladstone, several acres of land have lain idle for a long time. These are now being walled in by Mr Curran, one of Invercargill's landed proprietors, with a view to turning it to account, and a very substantial wall is in course of erection, which should withstand the action of the tide for many years to come. The railway department intend putting in a level crossing to give access to the property. The work is being carried out by private enterprise, and a considerable sum of money is being expended. It might not be a bad idea were the Government approached in order to secure a grant towards the cost of forming the outlet road to the property.

Mr Holman, a member of the Legislature of New South Wales, has a poor opinion of the Sydney Pniversrity, declaring that so far as influencing national education it might as

well be a boxing. saloon or a beer shop.

The Southland Frozen Meat Co. are advertising ki this issue for butchers for Wallacetown and Mataura, and have also vacancies for learners, and invite the assistance and co-opera-tion of stock-owners during the present difficulty.

A capable elderly man desires a situation, or light casual work. Anyone having an opening will confer a favour by communicating with address given iin advertisement.

Mr W. Cruickshanks’ woollen mill at North Invercargill has been leased for five years, with the right to purchase at the end of the term. Three of the new owners have been connected with the Roslyn mills, and one with the Bruce mill.

The officials of the Domestic Workers’ L'nioh, Wellington, state that the case ag'ainst the mistresses wall probably go straight to the Arbitration Court after a formal reference to the Conciliation Board. Citations are now being issued to each employer, and over 1000 will be cited. It appears that the emissaries of the union have been visiting different houses to ascertain how 7 the mistresses are treating their servants, and this action has given serious offence in some quarters.

The Southland Sand Brick Co. has every reason to be pleased with their efforts to supply the colony with this class of building material. Old prejudices die hard, but the company has proved to the satisfaction of all that their bricks have the genuine ring, and are finding favour locally far beyond their expectations. Messrs Nichol Bros., Esk street, arc the local agents, and can supply further particulars. The manager, Mr Todd, is applying for an extension of the abattoir railway siding to connect the works, and a great future is predicted for this concern.

McMahon’s dramatic company have no reason to regret their visit to Invercargill. During the production of their four plays in as many nights the audiences were very large. The scenery was perhaps the best yet shown loyally, and the acting was of a very high order, and the public were not slow in appreciating the efforts of the company. On Thursday evening the season was brought to a close, to a crowded house, with the old favourite “East Lynne,” and the various parts were handled as only professionals can. The company intend to favour us with another visit shortly, and they can rely on a hearty welcome.

The Gladstone Corporation intend entering on an expenditure of £IOOO an borough improvements. £7OO is to bo spent on asphalting ; £l5O in repairing a sea wall and formingstreets in Burton ; £l5O in formi'ng streets in Coldstream, whore there is a brisk demand for building sites. The move is considered a wise one for the borough is being rapidly built on, and good footpaths are a necessity.

An attempt has been made to assassinate oho Grand Duke Nicholas of Russia. The Czar will not attend the opening of the Duma, but will be represented by a proxy.

The strike of slaughtermen employed by the freezing companies has extended during the week, and is now practically general throughout the colony. In the case of two works at Wellington the men resumed duty on receiving an advance of 23s per sheep ; at Wang’anui the butchers arc given a bonus, and at Auckland the men have formed a union as a preliminary to making certain demands. With these exceptions the slaughtermen have struck —they don’t call it striking, but stopping - work —a distinction without a difference most people will think. The men at the Ocean Beach, Wallacetown, and Mataura stopped work this week, apparently more out of sympathy with their follow-workers in the north than because of any local grievances. It is possible that the conferences that are going on may result in a settlement, but meantime freezing operations are at a standstill, Companies’ buyers have been ordered to cease buying, and suppliers have also been told to cease I'otwarding. In the case against the Unionists in Wellington for a breach of award the court reserved its decision, but it has since taken evidence against 24 of the Unionists on strike at Parcora (Canterbury) with the result tha.t fines of £s' each were imposed.

The Political Labour League of New Zealand intends to put up candidates for the municipal councils. Tfiie "platform” of the League includes payment of councillors for their services.

The public meeting held in Invercargill on Monday night re-affirmed the desirableness of erecting the troopers’ memorial at the intersection of Dee and Tay streets, and the work is to lie pushed ahead.

Those who had the pleasure of hearing the Austral Band, which visited Invercargill recently, will be glad to renew their acquaintance with them on Saturday and Sunday next. In the Army barracks on Sat-, urday night they give a grand concert, and on Sunday conduct a musical sacred concert. On Sunday evening they give a concert of very high order in the theatre after church. At the Sunday services silver coin collections will bo made. The band consists of 21 female performers. On Monday they take their departure for Australia.- Tihose who can attend should not miss this final opportunity.

Mr John Nelson, Milton, was the successful tenderer for the cargo of the wrecked barque Marguerite Mirabaud, the price being £425. Messrs O-eddes and Hopkins bought the vessel and stores, etc., for £lOl. About a dozen seamen from Dunedin have gone out to commence operations.

The steamer Rakiura is still hard and fast on the beach at Will slier Bay, and it is probable another fortnight will go by before an effort will be made to shift her. A report • was current that the Theresa Ward was going round to give a tow, but so far no arrangements have been made.

The trustees of the Irish Parliamentary fund have made an appeal for subscriptions. Several reasons are givoin for the apathy of the people in Ireland —one being that at least £40,000 has been collected by missions throughout the world, and that this sum is available.

On Monday afeernoon a fire broke out in the premises in Tay street occupied by the Southland Bread Co., having started in the bakery, and before the flames wore subdued by the fire brigade damage to the extent ox about £BOO was done. The insurances on the plant and machinery total £2425.

There are only two criminal cases to come before His Honour Mr Justice Williams at the March Sittings of the Supreme Court, which open at Invercargill on Tuesday—Richard Lloyd, charged with shooting a cow at Waimatua. and Patrick Finn and John Keating, alleged robbery at Wrey’s Bush. The civil cases include that of Ethel Benjamin v. Horace Bastings, claim. £147 18s lOd, balance of professional fees alleged to he duo in connection with the Invercargill licensing appeal.

A visitor to Queenstown by one of the recent excursions called at this office with a very fine sample of French beans from the garden of Mr Bryant. Fast season Mr Bryant took 21 first prizes, but is not showing this year in order to give others a chance. Our informant describes his garden as one of the best market gardens that has come under his notice. The beans are well-developed and grow to a very large size. A short time ago the Mayor of Dunedin visited the garden, and was so delighted with them that he took a large box home with him. Some of the runners are staked to a height of 14ft., and Mr Bryant has a busy time in season filling orders. His rthow of Begonias is also very fine, and would hold its own almost anywhere. Two hundred and three third class passengers have arrived at Wellington from London. They are mostly labourers and mechanics.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., MARCH 2. General News., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 50, 2 March 1907

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2,357

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., MARCH 2. General News. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 50, 2 March 1907

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