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The Garden.

NOTES FOR FEBRUARY.:

(By “Murihiku.’ - ') During this month and next also every precaution should be taken to ■nrevent weeds from seeding - ; a little attention in this respect now will save a great deal of trouble later on, and as the provisions of the Noxious Weeds Act render their destruction compulsory by land owners, those .who perform their duty conscientiously in this respect will have the satisfaction of knowing - that the caieless and indifferent are now responsible for their apathy in allowing - the seeds to mature and spread broadcast. There is no doubt but that much a - ood will result from the operations" of the Act. As recommended last month, the planting of the cabbage tribe, savoys, broccoli, curled kale, etc., for use during winter, it not already finished, should be completed at once, as those to mature, properly require to be almost Cullgrown before winter sets in. Celery should also be got in without delay. 'A sowing of prickly spinach and golden ball turnips should be made for late use. and towards the middle of the month, in a sheltered position, early cabbage and cauliflower to plant out in spring. For hardiness, Early York, St. John's Day, London Market, and Daniel's Defiance ■ cabbages jmv be recommended, and the Walcheren and Early London cauliflowers. Keeping these plants through the winter is generally a matter of 'difficulty, so that in choosing a spot for sowing one should be taken as likely to protect from from frosts as much as possible. Shallots and potato onions should be lifted when nearly ripe, and either hung on fences or allowed to lie on the ground for two or three weeks, so as to be thoroughly dry before being stored away. In the flower garden care should be taken to see that dahlias, hollyhocks, and other tall growing plants are securely fastened to prevent injury from'the winds. With these and other flowering plants the borders should now be quite gay. To secure good blooms for exhibition purposes, they should be frequently top-dressed with guano, surplus growth cut "out, and during dry weather copious supplies of water or liquid manure should be given them. This and next month is the proper time to propagate, by cuttings, such plants as fuschias, geraniums, petunias, pansies, verbenas, penstemons, etc. They should be inserted in a mixture of good loam and fine sand, on a gentle heat if possible and not allowed too much sunlight. This is also the proper time to propagate roses and fruit trees by budding. Seeds of Antirrhiniums, Sweet William, Canterbury Bells, Brompton Stocks., etc., required for flow 7 ering early next spring should be put in now 7, and if under glass, so much the better. They will be found to meet a much felt want at that season of the year. Spring flowering bulbs may be lifted now when necessary. It is not advisable to do so every Year, as to a certain extent their

growth and floriferousness is interfered with thereby ; therefore about once in three years wdll be found quite sufficient for all practical purposes. Much finer blooms for exhibition are also got the second year after planting, and this.is worth considering.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070209.2.5

Bibliographic details

The Garden., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 50, 9 February 1907

Word Count
531

The Garden. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 50, 9 February 1907

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