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The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., FEB. 9th. General News.

Home and Australian mails close at Invorcai’igill at 2.45 p.m. on Monday.

Messrs Henderson and Batger have made a change ia the name of the firm, and will now be known as Henderson and Co. The firm is still in a porition to deal liberally with clients and conduct sales in any part of the district. Although the title of the firm has changed their patrons can rest assured that their interests will be studied in every particular.

A visitor walking down Itkklel street the other day had his attention drawn by the puff-puff of a gas engine, and discovered that it was the property of the enterprising Westport Coal Company, hard at it, working a screening plant. The idea, is a good one, and all the coal is now as it comes off the trucks into the yards, and householders will appreciate the efforts of the Westport Coal Co. to supply the very best clean coal procurable at the lowest possible price. It is understood the screening plant was manufactured locally by Messrs Johnston and sons, at the Vulcan Foundry.

Mr T. W. Walker, town clerk, offers a reward for the conviction of persons setting fire to the trees in reserves, or pilfering flowers in the gardens or cemetery.

Both local bands took their -departure foe, the Christchurch contest on Friday,- and if honours don't come this way it won’t be for, want of trying-. Ringing cheers were given as the train departed.

At. St. Paul’s Metho’dist Church on Sunday evening Miss Dryden will sing- “The Refuge of the Soul” and the Rev. A. Mitchell will answer his monthly budget of questions. The Sacrament will be administered at the close of the morning service.

Mr Wm. Sharp, engineer, • invites tenders for ditching work in A venal.

The Southland A. and P. Society are making a move in connection .with the site of the new show grounds. In this issue Mr Sharp, engineer, invites tenders for a sea wall. The grounds will be very handy to town, and the Society will have a very valuable property when the necessary works are carried out.

Perry’s Blorama Co, announce a farewell appearance in Invercargill, ail'd the public will be pleased to renew their acquaintance. The company has been touring- the colony, and has met with prnounced success. A number of Exhibition views have been secured, and a first-class instructive entertainment is promised. The first exhibition is to-night, and on Sunday evening a number of sacred views will be shown.

Mr J. P. Purdue, of Nightcaps, journeyed to Evans’ Elat on Monday ■last to take part in -the dog trials In connection with the Tuapeka competitions. In the all-comers event Mr Purdue secured 3rd. prize, while in the hmrtaway class his fancy dog “Roy” secured second place. Mr Purdue is a great dog fancier, and has a decided objection to the way dogs are accommodated on the railways, and thinks the Department should supply better boxes.

Word was received in town yesterday that Mr J. Blacke, stationer, has received second prize (a silver medal) at the Christchurch Exhibition for fretwork (a smokers’ casket) ; while Mr H. Dunlop, moiiioline operator of the “Southern Cross” staff, came third (bronze medal) in the same class, with a model of Nelson’s Column. Tt is very satisfactory that these young Tnvercargillites are so well up, as there was a very large entry of choice work from all parts of the colony.

Invercargill has a lot to he thankful for in being situated in the far south. The ' Dunedin hotelkeepers and restaurant proprietors are now wondering- how they will fare when the Exhibition is over. iMost of them are dependent on the travelling- public, and a big falling off in business is expected, ■ and in view of higher rates and taxes for various large undertakings completed and now on hand, more than one is thinking of quitting the Edinburgh of the South.

It is reported that a large English firm is using Xew Zealand pahautea, kohekohe, and kawakawa, and the top branches of totar a for the manufacture of lead pencils for the celebrated maker (Hr Cohen), who is exhibiting 30,000 pencils of X.Z;. wood. Pencils could be m a de from these Xew Zealand woods 80 per cent, cheaper than from the usu a l cedar. This, too, would enable the top branches of trees, at present a waste product, to be turned to profitable account.

The water supply of Dunedin has ■been causing grave concern to the City Fathers. The supply has been curtailed in all possible directions, and the public are not posted in the real state of affairs in case it might cause alarm. The supply at the drinking fountains has been stopped, and the streets go unwatered. On Tuesday evening the Besses Band gave a promenade concert, and as luck would have it the rain came down for an hour or two and made •things unpleasant, without making any material difference in the water supply. I'li * corporation have taken a wise step in holding a reserve in case of fire. Dunedin’s weather prophet promised electric showers, but up to Thursday they had not appeared. On Tuesday about -Jin. of rain fell, and it is said there is about 71 days’ water, taking the general average.

The Southlander who has a good crop of turnips and oats this year and a little spare cash shoukl pay a visit to Ot a go a?td purchase stock as the market is falling rapidly, and there seems a good chance of profit by our friends’ misfortune.

The Besses o’ the Barn band favouring a selection from Mascagni, recalls an incident in regard to the great composer’s visit to America. His masterpiece is without doubt the intermezzo from “Cavalleria Ru.sticana.” Mascagni one day met 'an organ grinder, producing this fine composition in the most mechanical way. The composer, going to the organ, explained matters of time and feeling to the man with the handle, and the explanations were duly appreciated. Some days- later the tonepoet again met the barrel organist, and was surprised to find.a rude placard attached to his instrument bearing the legend : “Pupil of Pietro Mascagni. ’ ’

“Just the juicy oyster,” “A snorter,” “What a boskor,” “Not so dusty,” and similar delicate expressions abound in the visitors’ book at the Christchurch Exhibition, which .(says an exchange) is becoming a veritable dictionary of slang, and forms a splendid illustration of the higher education of the twentiethcentury.

Mr and Mrs C. Broad, senr., Gladstone, celebrated their golden wedding on. the evening of the Ist inst. A banquet was served in the parish hall at 6.30 p.m. by Messrs Kin-gs-land and Son, and a large number of guests assembled. The Rev. W. S win-burn, vicar of Gladstone, presided, and in a happy speech proposed the health of the guests of the evening, Mr and Mrs Broad, whose kind and genial natures, untiring industry, and good citizenship had won them the respect and esteem of all. Ho also made a golden offering on behalf of the children in the form of a purse of sovereigns. Messrs S. McDonald, R. Cleave, Wesney (senr.), McNeil, Thomson, and Couli-ng, supported the chairman’s remarks, the last-named stating that Mr Broad was one of the founders of the horticultural society. Mr C. J. Broad responded for his parents. Mr and Mrs Broad were married in St. Paul’s Church, Islington, on February Ist, 1857, by the Rev. Samuel Boddy. They came to New Zealand in the same year in the sailing ship Alma, landing in Wellington, and later on coming to Southland. Arriving in Gladstone in 1861, Mr Broad made his home there, and has been one of the pioneers of the suburb. The family comprises five sons and tw.o daughters-: Mr C. .J. Broad. Gladstone, live children ; Mr T. Broad, Wellington, live children ; Mr W. Broad, Grasmere, 10 children ; Mr E. Broad, Dunedin, one child ; MissBroad, Gladstone ; Mrs Thos. Brown, Gore, two children ; Mr A. Broad, Gladstone, two children. Of the 25 grandchildren, 24 survive. During the hearing of the charge of burglary against Findlay at Oamaru the Otago Daily Times reports that accused asked for a remand to allow him to obtain counsel. He said that his commilal only look place on Saturday evening, and he had had no time to collect money to secure counsel's services. In reply to his Honour, the accused said he only learned on the previous evening that Mr Hanlon would not- appear for him in the Supreme Court. Accused -gave Mr Hal non £ls to appear J'or him in the Magistrate’s Court, but he would not -appear in the higher court unless his fees were forthcoming. llis Honour remarked that he must give the prisoner an opportunity of being represented by counsel. This appeared to be a case which illustrated the necessity for official defenders as well as Crown prosecutors. Mr Fraser remarked that there was a local bar. He felt sure that the profession had not fallen so low that the lack of funds would deter one of its members from conducting the defence of an impecunious prisoner charged with a serious offence. Accused, apparently desired a particular counsel at a particular fee- The remand was granted. Mr Hanlon, in reply to Mr Fraser, holds that a lawyer is' not bound to appeal- for penniless pi-is oners except, when asked by the. judge to do so.

The crops in North and South Otago are in a vers- bad state for want of rain, and, in some cases stock has: had to be turned into the oats in order to save them from starving. Sheep have had to be sacrificed, and cattle shifted to fresh pastures. The turnips are a- partial failure, and oats are very poor. Tt means that winter feed will be Aery dear. One Otago farmer could ha vest) kl a flock of sheep a short time ago at £1 per head, and refuted to part with them. The other day ho disposed of the lot at 4s each on account of the shortage of fodder, and the long distance he had to go to get sufficient water for their requirements.

An elderly Wellington settler, who "’as about to •'shuffle off this mortal coil,” instead of calling in a lawyer and making a will, proceeded to draw a plan of his property, on which he indicated certain points as clues to spots where he had buried his fortune. Of this legacy, which amounts to about iiIS.OO, the greater, part in gold has already been recovered. Evidently banks are-not a popular institution with Some people.

Dunedin folk want to know why the butchery can't sell meat cheaper than they are at present, considering the price of stock. It- must be- remembered that although stock is low, these lines are not suitable for butchers' in their present condition, and for firstclass prime mutton the prices are fairly' firm.

Wyndham is experiencing a prosperous time at present, and although the drought has had some effect on the crops and stock, residents are sanguine that, their progressive township will more than hold its own. This- is as it should be, and the latest sign of progress- is on the comer of Balaclava and Ferry streets, where Mr S. Shaw has completed a very handsome residence for Mr Bea.rege. It, has been finished in a workmanlike manner. The hall is done in grained walnut and the parlour in mottled oak, and the whole designs’ have been effectively canned out. The decorative work was in the capable hands of Messrs McCulloch, Bros., of Invercargill, and they hape made a very- fine job of it. The building is to be occupied by the local stationmaster.

Au American cable soberly seates that 'twenty Standpoint residences took a nocturnal skating trip on I.,ake Michigan. They were assisted to the spot by a very heavy gale, anti the inmates had some trouble in leaving their homes ‘'while in motion.

At the recent big blaze in Dunedin a mean act was played on an old man who lives in a cottage close by. He left open his door, and went out to see how the lire was going- on, and when he came back his bed and blankets had been appropriated, and after fruitless s’arch, has given the matter up. Another neighbour lost a watch and chain oft the mantelpiece. While the fire . was at Us height the light-fingered gentry took the chance of collecting spoil.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19070209.2.18

Bibliographic details

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., FEB. 9th. General News., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 50, 9 February 1907

Word Count
2,089

The Southern Cross. PUBLISHED WEEKLY. INVERCARGILL, SAT., FEB. 9th. General News. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 50, 9 February 1907

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