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SOUTHERN CROSS SHOW BULLETIN.

“You have a fine town here, your buildings are worthy of it, remarked a visitor the other day. When he has seen the country lying north, east, south, and w'est of us, he will be ready to admit that with such a district about her, Invercargill has the brightest of futures In store. And speaking of the country reminds us that just now’ it 1S looking its best-as the Premier told his hearers in the theatre the other night, the scene is one of smiling fields and homesteads, and even the sheep look happy- What all this means to the tiller of the sod, and for that matter to everyone of the colony,will be seen in concrete form on Tuesday and Wednesday next—the davs fixed for the annual exhibitiob of the Southland Metropolitan A. and P. Association. It is the fortieth of the series—a long record and vet there are people amongst us—notably our worthy mayor, who can look back to the time when the country was in a state of nature, and the site of the town unredeemed from the native bush. The entries, it is pleasant to learn, are, well up to the mark, and will Include exhibits from as far north as 'Auckland. Local breeders wife meet foem'en worthy of their steel, so to speak, -but their success at the big show at- the Exhibition promises well for their ability to hold theii own against all - comers. The management and railway authorities have so arranged matters that countiy visitors -will be able to see all the competitions before hurrying off to catch the outgoing trains. _ Apart from the show itsell theie will be numerous incidental attractions for the benefit of patrons. The Association itself, mindful that sightseeing and instruction should be relieved by the introduction of something lighter, have arranged for the establishment on the grounds of the Laughing Gallery, which has been delighting visitors to the Exhibition. Altogether the success of the forthcoming show seems to be assured, and with seasonable weather there should be a groat influx of country folk into Invercargill on Wednesday next, “The People’s Day.” The inner man, woman, or child will want to be replenished, and purchases will have to be made in view of the approaching holidays. For their benefit the subjoined business notes have been compiled under the title, “Bound the Town.”

Arriving in Invercargill with time to spare before ■ the afternoon express went north, I made a h'u ned tour of some of the streets m the near vicinity of the central railway depot. On inquiry, a bystander informed me that this was Esk street, and up the street a yellow-painted store was so conspicuous as to invite inspection. The shop turned out to be , „ „ , LILLI CRAP, McNT AU GHTOIS & Co s, Booksellers and stationers, as well as the local agency for the wellknown Dresden Company. In fact, one whole window of this combination establishment showed a large assortment of popular songs, piano and violin solos, and all at the giving away price of sixpence. Much of the floor area was devoted to the exhibition of musical instruments, all of which were by the best makers of the day, and procurable at reasonable terms. Evidently there is no possibility or the post card craze dying out yet, and intending purchasers will find a fine selection to choose from here—some of them, indeed, veritable works of art, and well worth space in the nicely got up albums that are to be seen for the asking. In their stationery and book departments the firm fairly excel themselves. In the former every detail has received consideration, and the needs and tastes of all are catered for. For example, the schoolboy or schoolgirl can get whatever appeals to his or her fanciful mood in pencil, pen, crayon, note-book, .exercise book, writing pad block, etc. The commeicial man can obtain all that is wanted for the office-desk. The student with the weakness for something plain and good may likewise bo satisfied The maiden who dotes on fancy "note’ • could go further and

“ ROUND THE TOWN.”

fare worse, and the indifferent individual who only cares for good value for his money, may also seek here and find. * The book lover, the novel reader, and the little child could alike readily wander to the land of forgetfulness among the shelves of this book store, for on them are the poems of the most gifted poets, prose by standard authors, romances by the most popular writers and toy books that, just to look at the outside cover, is enough to win the heart of the crosstest baby in the nursery. Before leaving I took a note of some of the numerous volumes that interested me. To begin with, the little folks, if you want something big, what could be better than “Chums” or “The Boys’ Annual ?” If your taste lies in the direction of something less bulky, well, there are “Bo Peep,” “Pip Pip,” “Aladdin,” “Pears’ Annual,” “Xmas Morning,” but if you desire something decidedly literary and yet intelligible to the youthful mind, there’s a line also to suit you. Just go and have a look at that series of books “Told to the Children.” Among them you will find “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” told to the children ; Shakespeare, told to the children ; “Fame Queen” told to the children ; “Heroes,” told to the children ; Aesop’s Fables, Robinson Crusoe, etc. The volume is small, but neatly got up. The type is clear. The story is told in choice but simple language, and has the additional advantage of being rich in illustrations, while the price is—a florin. There are still remaining a few of Nimmo’s miniature library. As an example, I mention a tiny greentied copy of “She stoops to Conquer,” that a man might easily fold in the hollow of his hand. Another attractive series was one bound in green and gold boards. This comprised the works of all oui' best poets and authors of prose, and would prove an acceptable gift to one’s literary friends. In scientific works, observed Jack’s “Heredity,” Jack’s “Sociology,” Jack’s “Psychology,” also his “Spiritualism” and his “Ethics,” while on another shelf a long row of volumes dealt with almost every art and industry under the sun, and to my amazement I found them all edited by the same man, namely, Paul N. Hasluck. From the last named gentleman I wandered to a neighbouring stand, and picked up another set. ity made me go right through them to see if they were by the same author. They were not, however, and proved to be treatises on the diseases of various animals —dogs, horses, swine, etc. With the thought—- “ How valuable to the farmer,” I remembered that time was passing, and reluctantly betook myself from a stationer and bookseller who seems to cater for everybody’s needs, intelligences, and information. In the principal street (Dee street) my interest first centered itself in the shop of Messrs W. J. Lyon and Co. There is something that rouses the . curiosity in a crowd —a crowd round a shop window near that big bank at the corner made me elbow my way in too. LYON’S was the name -writ across the establishment. “That’s cute,” thought I, “Lyon by name and Lyon by nature —you've got the lion’s share of attention at this present moment anyway.” A man and a small boy seemed to find their entertainment in the post cardls—the former in the comic ones where Mrs Caudle was delivering the curtain lecture—the latter in those that illustrated such popular ditties as “Kory O’More,”' “Ailsa Mine,” “Tit for Tat,” and “The Vacant Chair,” while one of two ladies, pointing to some of Holman Hunt's Light of the World,” ejaculated—- “ Aren’t they lovely?” so I gathered that her particular interest lay in religious series. J I liked the show of stationery in the window. In note papers there were the “New Zealand,” the “Crescent,” the “Handsel,” the “Viking,” the “Floral” (violets and forget-me-nots), and in letter tablets the “New Zealand,” the “British Empire,'-- and

the “Autocrat" makes in office re’s quirements. ledgers, journals, the ’ “where is it ?"—to say nothing of note-hooks, rulers, pens, and pencils hy best manufacturers, Caldwell’s ink, mucilage, rubbers, etc. There was a large assortment- of naper-bound books, too ; some at sixpence and others at one shilling. At the latter figure I saw works by Jane Barlow, Irving Batcheler, Merriman, Findlater, Ronald Ross, Norris, and others. The news agency was of no mean order either, comprising as it did all the local dailies and weeklies, some of the Northern New Zealand papers, Scraps, Alley Sloper’s Half-holiday, The Australian, Woman s Budget, et The fancy goods element is introduced largely into this store, too, and among other wares my observation fell on some pictures, a large selection of picture and photo frames in oak, celluloid, imitation bronze and papier mache ; also ornaments in endless variety—some pretty little Japanese ones being only a threepenny piece each ; while in China I noticed some dainty broad and butter plates in delicate shades of pink and blue : in enamel, teapots with floral designs on them ; in kitchen necessities, patty tins, brushware, sieves, graters, etc ; and in basketware, picnicking baskets, flower baskets, waste paper baskets, work baskets (some of which were neatly lined with satin) ; requisites for the toilet, such as tooth a nd nail brushes, soaps, perfumes and trinkets held their own, and there was also a good selection of children’s toys. In conclusion, I would strongly advise all visitors to Invercargill to include Lyon’s in their perambulations. It is exactly opposite the Post Office the centre of interest to every tourist, and therefore the right shop in the right place. A. NOBLE & CO. considering the space at their disposal, make a very attractive show of fancy goods. On one shelf I noticed a whole lot of odds and ends marked at very low prices. For instance, there were a basketful of egg-cups at one penny each, china teapots at 9d, children s mugs according to size 4d and 6d each, pudding basins for the same, and cheap jugs. One set of jugs—white, with ivy trailing over them — quite took my fancy, as also did the fine assortment of crystal which is so easily kept bright, and adds so much to the cool look of the table on hot summer days. Among the glassware I specialise some butter coolers, pre- . serve dishes, cake stands, and flower vases. In ornaments, too, as well as the more elaborate and more expensive article, there were some very pretty little specimens in soft shades of green and yellow that would show off to perfection a rose, a few sweet peas, or something similar, while for larger blooms such as peonies, rhododendrons, laurestinus, etc., a flower bowl with a quaint design of fishes was just the very thing. ■ In figure ornaments, some China ones in Oriental tintings with a woman leaning against a pedestal surmounted by a ewer, and another collection of ebony-coloured babies squatting about in various positions were what I liked best, for in both cases the attitudes and colourings we so decidedly what they were meant to*be—Eastern. Before leaving the fancy goods department, I would mention among other things a varied collection of basketware, toilet necessaries, trays, afternoon tea sets. The business of the firm extends itself to books, stationery and post cards and news agoicy. Two series of post cards so pleased several passers-by that they promised themselves to become purchasers—namely, a study of cats, and another entitled “The breach of promise” series. A special feature are the toys for Xmas, prize books, and school books. A man named Brown—Mr Gordon Brown, of GORDON BROWN & CO., received me pleasantly at his fancy goads shop. A magnificent display, of post cards and post card albums first attracted my attention. They were simply lovely and in endless variety, but the ones I liked best were a series depicting child life —some in black and white and some in the most delicate of Oriental tints. A collection of seascapes at Is each likewise attracted me. They nearly all were storm effects on different parts of the English coast. These framed in white would make a pretty picture. In a large assortment of photoframes some were exceedingly artistic, while one was really handsome. Arranged in three folding leaves, it

I had apace for eight photos, six in the square and two in the round style—room for quite a family gath-

ering. Another small overmantel was unique, with mirror in the centre, and on either side a picture, framed in the overmantel itself.

Among the fancy goods there were many novelties in ornaments and bric-a-brac —besides a large selection of china, enamel, and tinware, and electro-plated goods, and a line Of watches at ss. The show of clocks was good, ranging as they did from the alarm and ordinary kitchen timepiece to massivemarble ones for the grand saloon, and' dainty little ones for my lady’s boudoir. Ladies’ brushware, hand mirrors, tortoiseshell combs and toilet requisites generally, were well stocked, and; the same might be said of leather travelling bag©, tin trunks, hat boxes, dress baskets, work baskets, writing desks, ladies companions, etc. One big stand was packed with children’s toys, to say nothing of dozens of wheelbarrows awaiting thepleasure of some juvenile and tennis racquets, bats, balls, etc, for the bigger boys and girls. As well as fancy goods this emporium traffics with music, stationery and books. In each of the first two lines I noticed the themes and works of the popular composers, authors and authoresses of the .periodsome in cheap editions, and all at moderate prices. In stationery there were the wellknown “Scotch Grey, ’’ “Royal Vellum,’’ “Inter Empire,” “Excelsior” makes and others as well as an extensive choice of school requirements and office “papier.” In conclusion, one more jotting of this comprehensive stock, namely the N.Z3. Diary for 1907, which is obtainable at Gordon Brown's in sev-enty-five styles, varying in size from a pocket copy to an office folio. What seemed to be quite a new shop near the Leviathan called for a halt. You will think I have a mania in a certain direction, for I am about to tell you that this too was a fancy goods emporium, held by J. T. GIBSON &■ CO. With its double-windowed frontage and arcade-like interior his store looks Al. The stock is a most comprehensive one, of goods that are of a high-class order, obtainable at a moderate cost. The proprietors have acquired the art, too, of dressing a window. They realise that if the passer-by is to know what is there, if his attention is to be attracted, well, it won’t be done by packing the inside of that plate glass area like sardines in a tin. Illustrative of what I mean, and beginning with the sportsman, the cricketer, hurrying along, cannot help but observe the splendid arrangement of bats, wickets, and balls, while the artist sees at once the pretty-painted plaques which as are set out to such advantage somewhere else, or the attention of the housewife is called to the display of enamel which, hetergeneous as the collection is, still may be singled out and priced at a glance. An enamel rolling-pin was a novelty to me, but of course the other kitchen utensils such as pots and pans were familiar even to the writer. Those who embrace dairying among their various pursuits should have a look at the butter pats. Eng-lish-made butter jars, etc., which this firm stocks, and preserve makers would do well to have a look at the the jam and jelly jars before purchasing elsewhere. Traversing the hall and passages from dairy to parlour, I noticed a large assortment of door mats that were tasteful and inexpensive, and things of utility for every room in a house, such as soap dishes, sponges, and sponge baskets for the bathroom, w r are for the bedroom and for the drawing-room, all descriptions of pretty ornaments, flower pots, occasional tables, whatnots (4-shelved Japanese style price 16s 6d), flower stand (handsome \ brass and only 47s 6d), epergnes, fire screens, and the multiplicity of odds and ends that add to the comforts and ornamentation of one’s home. If right in my conjecture that this is a new shop, I congratulate J. T. Gibson and Co. on .their show, and wish them every success. Inthe principal thoroughfare also is THE LEVIATHAN, Wesney Bros.’ great big fancy goods emporium. Time was when small space served to hold the wares, but this old identity business has grown with the town, and to-day carries a stock unequalled for extent and vai> iety in the colonies. The enterprise of the proprietors has been amply recognised and rewarded, for the throngs that flock into the establish-, mient, especially at Xmas and New,

Year, show that a great many people believe that a visit to the town would be incomplete without a call .at Wesney’s. . Turning to the right on entering, 1 found myself in the book department, which was furnished with a J er y wide range of literature. Standard writers, and the most modern poets and authors were, so to speak, rubbing shoulders with each other. In passing I would like to mention just two volumes which caught my fancy. One was -Things seen in Japan ” a richly-illustrated little work, and the other “Colour Prints of Japan.” The latter appealed to me as being singularly attractive to the student of art. The stock of children’s toy books was immense, and all marked at almost giving away prices. My summing up of this particular corner was that it was a real gold-mine to the bookman, and afterwards I learned that the proprietors made a specialty of school prizes and gift books. Music came next. It was there galore, but I did not wait to turn it over, for stands and shelves in the near vicinity hurried me onwards. My feeling was one of amazement at the immensity of really choice and pretty ware that was to be procured so inexpensively —imagine a tea set complete for only 8s lid. Another with the quaintest of tracings in a subdued pink was exquisitely delicate. Several patterns in dinner services were marked at 30s for 50 pieces, while jugs, teapots, cups and saucers, children’s mugs, dainty little sweets dishes, etc. were present in endless variety. The crystal, »poo, was lovely, especially the cut glass, and among the ornaments the assortment was perfectly bewildering. To those about to furnish, a visit here would prove a practical demonstration of domestic economy, for the necessaries and adornments of cottage and villa alike may be secured on the terms the firm’s motto avers —“A single article at wholesale price.” No house in Invercargill should be wanting in bric-a-brac, when the householder can buy nick-nacks for a humble threepence. For table decoration there were several styles* in specimen glasses and also that white ware which is so fashionable. Several handsome vases looked ex-, cellent value for the money, and a show case of . such beautiful goods as novel designs in electro-plate, silver, cutlery, bronzes, purses, handbags*, cigar cases, dressing cases, jewellery, perfume bottles, ladies’ and gentlemen’s brushware, walking sticks, work baskets, dress baskets, travelling bags, occasional tables, fire screens, photo frames, leather writing cases, glove and handkerchief boxes, pipes, etc., suggested various friends’ birthdays and weddings happening in the near future. Among the oddments in this big shop, which by the way, reminded me at times of Cole’s Arcade, I noticed soaps, perfumes, trinkets, and if my memory plays no tricks, even Nugget boot polish. The fancy work counter has silks, wools, cottons, the latest fashion magazines, and the newest patterns for sempstress and art worker. The toy stalls are an imposing feature of this establishment —one large stand being devoted to 'dolls. Dolls who make no pretensions at all, and dolls who claim to be real grandees if smartness of gown counts for anything in Dollyland. The other stall held all manner of playthings, from soft, fluffy squeaking animals to mechanical inventions for bigger children. Some fine rocking horses, tricycles, and wheel-bar-rows are awaiting a purchaser, and Father Christmas will undoubtedly carry off those dolls’ go-carts and perambulators to some of his good little girls. I began the Leviathan with books, and now, lingering for a few minutes to inspect the wealth of Xmas cards and post cards purchasable from-one penny upwards, I pass the stationery ■counter and find myself once more at the door, but ere I shuffle off this mortal coil, I hope for another such ramble through Wesney Brothers. Wending my way stationwards, at the corner of Dee and Esk streets I halted a few minutes at the BIBLE AND TRACT DEPOT. As the name implied, this firm caters chiefly for the requirements of cathedral, chapel, and church, and for the needs of most denominations, but in particular for Anglican, Presbyterian, Wesleyan and Methodist. There was a splendid selection of Bibles both in authorised and revised versions, and in New Testaments “Lloyd’s Corrected New Testament” looked a handy little volume. No one need be deprived of the Gospel, when he may own a copy for himself for only one penny.

I noticed also books of hymns with and without music in various bindings. Included among them were Church Praise, The Hymnary, Revival Songs, Sankey and Moody’s collection, etc. Illuminated texts were there by the hundreds from quite little ones to others the dimensions of a fair-sized picture. Some of them were most beautiful, and quite worth a neat frame. This store is richly stocked in helps, commentaries, and concordances to the various books of the Bible, and as instances I quote Commentaries on Phillippians, Colossians, the works of St. Paul, also a book on Revelation and one on Jeremiah. The children’s Bible—a large volume, well-illustrated —would be valuable in any family circle, and also the numerous children’s Sunday magazines would prove both interesting and instructive in the religious education of the young. The older folks, too, may find literature to aid them in their spiritual concerns, for there are volumes of addresses, ” Conversations with Young Men,” “Conversations with Young Women,” R. A. Torrey’s “How to Pray,” “How to study the Bible,” T. B. Meyer’s “Library of Scripture Biographies” dealing with lives of Joseph, Joshua, Abraham, etc., and in cheap editions Farrar’s “Life of Jesus,” “As Jesus passed by,” “Jesus the Carpenter of Nazareth,” “The Life of John G. Paton,” Drummond's “Ascent of Man,” etc. Among the multiplicity of writers whose works are found worthy of resting room in a Bible depot are Mark Rutherford, Joseph Hocking, Robert Browning, David Lyall, Ethel Turner, Lillian Turner, Annie Swan, J. R. Miller, and others. Sunday school teachers, Bible class leaders, lay men, and clergymen are fortunate indeed in having such a repository as this depot at hand. The depot, however, does not confine its exercises to bible and tract, but its business branches out to to things “stationery” as well as “ecclesiastical,” therefore the presence of notepaper, the “Swan,, and “Independent” pens, and the choice variety of pictorial post cards, Xmas and New Year cards*, etc. Just twenty minutes to train time, and after so much ironmongery and drapery, so many toys, and fancy goods, and such a satiety of sociology and theology I felt that both the inner and outer man required sustenance, so because firstly it had been highly recommended to me as one of the best luncheon rooms in town, and secondly because of its handiness to .my train, I found my way to Mrs McNatty’s “GEISHA” TEA ROOMS. The last Geisha I was in was in Australia, and it was underground. This was not —you approached it from the street level—a decided acquisition in the opinion of patrons who may be . bronchial, asthmatical, or hearty—and passing through large double doors entered first of all a small shop, where was displayed all manner of tempting viands*. A batch of scones and buns just from the oven made me think of my boyhood’s days, when it was my delight to go to a soiree, and have presented to me a Paper bag in which —whatever else —was sure to be a scone or a bun. The pound cake and the piled dishes of confections took me a good many years onward and suggested the party, the dance, and the picnic. The best makes of sweets were also in evidence, such as Buchanan’s, Fry’s, and Cailler’s chocolates, and Pascall’s bottled confectionery, etc. Continuing my way I passed a suite of prettily arranged tea rooms, where one could get a cup of tea or coffee with sandwich, scone, cake, or pie for a trifling sixpence, and at last my destination was reached in the din-ing-room. What a pretty room it was, with its pure white walls* and panelled dadoing. Mid-way across the centre, was a fretworked archway, and at the far end a handsome sideboard. Japanese screens were placed in suitable positions, while here and there a high pedestal surmounted by a palm and some choice pictures on the walls added to the artistic effect. The luncheon itself was* all that could be desired. The menu was soup, an entree, two hot joints*, three varieties of vegetables, and four sweets, terminating with a cup of tea. It was served expeditiously and only cost me a shilling. Visitors could not ho better than patronise these refreshment rooms, either on arrival or before departure of their trains. For all Xmas commodities try BAXTER. Choice peaches, pairs, apricots and pine apples.

In the window of MESSRS SMITH AND LAING’S the framed address since presented by the citizens to the Hon. Sir Joseph Ward, K.C.M.G., was on view an artistically 'illuminated memento of the town’s appreciation of the new Prime Minister of New Zealand. My respects paid to the picture and the attendant Union Jack, my attention drifted to the different wares this smart-looking ironmongers’ store offered for sale. These were most varied, and by no manner of means restricted to a harrow conception of the term ironmongery, which included, for example, such things as furniture, glassware, crockery, cutlery and plated ware, linoleums, etc. First to catch my eye was a modern mantelpiece in which was fitted a neat grate (hob style) set in a choice pattern of green tiles, and completed by a handsome brass fender and irons in front. On the mantle were some ornaments and a clock, each in its own way indicating the high-class articles. procurable within. One timepiece in particular made me covetous. It was a green marble one, with Doric columns in miniature in front. There was in evidence , also, a remarkably cheap line of watches ranging in price from 8s 6d to 15e. In another window was a fine display of electro-plated and silver goods, embracing a large selection of articles suitable for Xmas and wedding presents. In afternoon tea services' (some of them only 60s a set); carvers 15s to 35s ; fish-slices, cruets, sugar bowls, butter dishes, cake baskets, etc., there is a selection at pricer to suit all in patterns that migrated from the severely plain to the decidedly ornate. On a stand inside a tempting array of enamel ware would set any housewife’s heart in a flutter of delight. Pots, pans, dippers and milk jugs, teapots, and kettles, and all the odds and ends of kitchen and general household requirements were alike conspicuously displayed. The crockery department was also replete with dainty patterns in tea sets and dinner services, and I liked muchly the pretty white gates, fences, etc., which are the latest novelty for table decorations. The tourist can see here a good selection of travelling trunks, hat boxes, and leather bags ; while gardener, farmer, and Carpenter will also find the essential tools of their respective callings catered for in the most up-to-date hardware and ironmongery. In support of this statement, one window displayed a great assortment of such gear as saws, hammers, shears, pruning hooks, axes, lawn-mowers, Arkansas oilstones, and all manner of carpentering tools. Smith and Laing have lately added a furniture department to their already varied lines, and are now in a position to build and furnish a house from top to bottom, The visit was a brief one, still it was sufficiently long to be assured that he who shops at Smith and Laing’s receives excellent value for his dollar. And we were assured that all visitors to the show will get a hearty welcome whether they wish to buy or not. NATIONAL MORTGAGE & AGENCY CO. of N.Zi., Ltd., CRESCENT, INVERCARGILL. There is no doubt but that farmers take a great interest in the display made by the different mercantile firms at the annual show, and special interest is always centred with the firm with whom the farmer does the bulk of his business. In this particular case, the National Mortgage is a household name amongst Southland farmers, and it is certain that this year their stand will receive fully as many visitors as it has done in past years, for there is not the slightest doubt but that those who are termed the backbone of the country recognise and appreciate the efforts put forth by the above company to cater for their trade. The--genial— aasL. fiopul ar manager of the - Company, Mr A. F. Hawke, who has been in a very great measure responsible for-, (he great strides that have beeriy made in the Co.’s business during the fifteen years he has had the control \of the Invercargill branch, is at present on a trip to the old country, which will extend for another nine months. Owing to the growth of the Co.’s business it has been found necessary to make extra office accommodation. This work has been completed, and the Crescent office is now one of the most up-to-date establishments in Invercargill. The Co. has also a new wool store in course of construction, which is now practically finished, and will be ready to receive wool for the

first sale which is to be be held on 18th December. This store is built on. the most improved lines, being splendidly lighted and in every way suited for the showing of wool to advantage. The store is built to hold 3200 bales wool, so it will be readily seen that it is a large building. It is connected with a private railway siding. Reports all go to show that the wool market is very firm, and likely to keep so, and as best results are always obtained in the open market where buyers from all parts of the world congregate, no doubt this year will see record catalogues, and if this is so the "National” will have nothing to regret by having kept abreast of the times, and put up such a commodious and suitable building in which to store wool. To return to the’A. and P. Show, the Co. will have a display of all the lines they are interested in, including the different brands of manures, foremost of which is the well-known "Crescent” fertilizers for oats, turnips, rape, and grass, also Coral Queen guano, "Crescent” bonedust, etc., etc., all of which are too wellknown to call for any comment. The company act in conjunction with Messrs Tothill, Ltd., as agents for Sutton’s Seeds, known all over the world as the best seeds procurable. The company make a great display of this particular part of their trade, as without good seeds the farmers’ work and toil would be no avail. Space forbids giving any further particulars of the above Co.’s display, but we who attend the show should be sure to have a look at the stand. The National Mortgage Co. flatter themselves that there is no part of the farmer’s business that they cannot do, and do well, too, and the opinions expressed from time to time by different farmers certainly endorse the sentiments. SOUTHLAND FARMERS’ CO-OPER-ATIVE ASSOCIATION. It seems only the other week that the staff of the above institution took possession of their new premises in Leet street, and yet when our representative looked in on Tuesday, he found Mr George Poole, the wellknown contractor, and a number of men busily engaged in carrying out a large addition on the eastern side of the already extensive building. Inquiries as to the why and wherefore disclosed that the growth of business has been so rapid that more space for the bestowal of stock is urgently needed. The workmen are doing their best to have the additions completed in time for the forthcoming wool season, the intention being- to remove a quantity of goods from the main structure to the new one, and devote the greater floor area thus gained to the display of wool. Buyers last year were loud in their praises of the light and accommodation available—this season they will have still greater cause for praise, for the changes in progress will make the “wool floor” one of the finest in the colony. Mr James Hanna, who is in charge of the store, is jubilant, and is doing' his level best to have everything ship-shape—first for the show and next for the wool sales. It is worthy of note that he began his career as a storeman in the early sixties, working for the old-time firm of Calder and Blacklock, and afterwards for the New Zealand Loan Co. During all those years he has kept in clkse touch with the farmers of Southland, among whom he numbers friends from the Waiau to Waikaia. As usual, the Association will be well-represented at the show next week —everything that the farmer, and for that matter the farmer’s wife, requires is stocked, and samples of the leading lines will be on view in the Association’s tent. Altogether, everything appears to be doing well, with bright prospects ahead, and Mr M. Carr, the go-ahead manager, and his associates are to be congratulated accordingly. RAILWAY PRIVATE HOTEL. The above house stands invitingly close to the railway station, and visitors to the show in search of good quarters can be confidently recommended to give it a trial. Externally attractive, the interior will be found not less so—under the experienced management of Mrs Thomas and her daughter the place possesses the home-like atmosphere so pleasing to the travellers just off the train. The sleeping accommodation could not be bettered, and the dining-room with its well-filled tables, is just the place in which to satisfy the keen demands of appetite. The old-time bar is gone, but apart from that the reputation of "The Railway” as a first-class hostelry is being more than maintained by Mrs Thomas and her staff.

SEARLE AND BRASS, as agents for Messrs Cooper and Duncan, Christchurch, provide an excellent display of exhibits, consisting of a variety of agricultural implement and machinery. The brand Coloni al” is now so well known among Southland farmers that it is unnecessary to comment upon the sterling .working merit of each implement, but special attention is called to the ■s'Colonial” gold medal combined grain, turnip, and manure drill, a massive spring tine cultivator, and a heavy swamp plough. In addition there arc a number of exhibits from the Cyclone Wove Wire Fence and Gate Company, consisting of pipe bar gates, woven wire gates, Fencing droppers, and samples of fencing. Messrs Scarle and Brass also have on view a very handsome latest pattern long-shafter exercising gig, built to order by Searle and Gibb, coachbuilders, Oamaru. It is fitted with rubber tyres, solid nickel mountings, Warner wheels, Collinge improved axle, and other special improvements which combine to make it all that could be desired for either pleasure or breaking-in purposes. REID AND GRAY. Messrs Reid and Gray are making a most extensive display of farm machinery, and samples of every implement required on a farm are shown on their stand. The splendid assortment of ploughs is first noticeable. The Champion double furrow, which has never yet been beaten in any trial of ploughing match, the short type 3-furrow single • lever, digger, drill, and hillside ploughs. The new pattern steel frame disc harrows! also -claim attention ; these are now fitted with dustproof renewable bearings, and have exceedingly handy travelling carriages. One of these is shown set for work, and others are neatly packed for travelling. The firm also make an attractive exhibit of turnip sowing and thinning machines. Their latest model ridger, fitted with Gray’s patent turnip seed telescopic conductor tubes and other new ideas, is the most reliable machine of its kind on the market. Their new (grain drill is also right up-to-date. Cultivators, rollers, wind-mills, and a host of other implements are shown. Reid and Gray enjoy the distinction of being recognised as the largest , makers of implements in the colony, and the immense business done by this firm is convincing evidence of the popularity of their and various manufactures. We would strongly recommend all visitors to the show to make a point of inspecting their exhibits. FINDS AY AND CO. In these days the question of what is and what isn’t good to eat is frequently discussed. Whatever differences of opinion exist, however, as to this or that commodity there is no doubt as to the quality of the products turned out by the above firm. Their fame as caterers for the public has travelled far, and orders for their hams and bacon and appetising small g-oods come all the way from the North Island. Apparently the people won't be happy till they get them, especially their pork sausages, which arc always in keen demand. ‘Just now the firm are making ample preparations to meet the holiday trade, and a glance through their ad-mirably-kept establishment next to the theatre, in Tay street, provokes a strong desire to sample the goods so invitingly displayed. Small goods, poultry, eggs, sausages, in fact that goes to furnish a well-filled table, are kept in stock. Mrs Lindsay and her daughters have built up a first-class business, and there is no secret about how it has been done. Nothing but the very best is allowed to leave the shop—this and the skill necessary to convert the raw material into dainty dishes, accounts for the success gained by Lindsay and Co. MR. J. HOLLOWAY. The heading doesn’t refer to the actor whose company lately visited us. Acting has nothing to do with our Mr J. Holloway. He’s always desperately in earnest, whether he is engineering a sports gathering, selling a farm, or conducting an auction sale. After he has done his business our genial friend is ready for a Joke. He lately took over the business of Featherstone and Co., auctioneers, land valuers, etc., in Esk street, next Deschler’s hotel, and appears to be making a success of it. Should any of our country friends, before visiting the show, desire to inspect the firm’s extensive list of town and country properties, we are sure they will be made welcome, and if a deal isn’t effected it won’t be Mr Hollo-

way's fault. He has had a varied experience in colonial life, from goldmining to auctioneering, and his ability to value property has been repeatedly demonstrated to the thorough satisfaction of clients. His lengthened residence in the district and knowledge of land values stands him in good stead in this special department, but visitors to the mart when a sale is going on will find that Mr Holloway is equally at home in other branches of the business, which he is carrying on so energetically.

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Bibliographic details

SOUTHERN CROSS SHOW BULLETIN., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 41, 8 December 1906

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SOUTHERN CROSS SHOW BULLETIN. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 41, 8 December 1906

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