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A. slight shock of earthquake was felt shortly before 1 p.m. to-day.

Special trama will be mnning between "the -post-onioe and Lytton I'oad to-mor-row, both in the forenoon and the afternoon, for the convenience of the racing public. Owing to the nominal fare, it is anticipated that the public will take full advantage of tho local service.

The annual picnic of the Watorsiders" Union was held in the Park tc-day, when there was present a, large crowd of parents and children, all of whom enjoyed the outing. The weather was beautiful. Children's eveiits were run off during the ' day, and increased Hhe interest of both parents and cliildren. Work was suspended on tho waterfront for the day. The boring experts, who have been extremely busy during the last six months m proving the new coalfield 1 at the Nine Mile, have just completed their eighth hole, which gave lift of clean coal (says the Rewanui correspondent of •'he Greymoufch Star). This practically proves close on 400 acres. In one hole the coal pinched down to about 6ft. The boxes put 'down give an aver-, age of about nine feet of clean coal right through the field. Court sittings were opened, yesterday ! at Tolaga Bay, Mr. J. S. Barton, S.M.", presiding there for the first •time. The first case was one- against the licensee of the Tolaga Hotel (Mr. Hopkins), of allegedly supplying liquor for con.sumpt.-ion off the premises after hours. Sergeant. McDonald prosecuted, and Mr. Burnard appeared on behalf of the defendant. In the course of the hearing there was a heated, interlude between the sergeant and counsel; the first ttwo police witnesses were treated as hostile, ;md the .sergeant refused to go any further with the case,

Redstone and! Sons' Morere-Wairoa coach leaves town at 7 a.m. % to-morrow, and the Coast coach at 9 a.m. "I think the advent ol motor cars lias made more men go home sober than user] to do when riding horses," Iras a remark of Mr. E. L. Lees at the motor 'conference yesterday. A local motorist who has just returned from a torn.: of the North Island declares that, the roads of this district are by no means the > worst lie experienced. A section of the rtiuain road from Hamilton to. Auckland was in a shocking condition, being entirely unmetalled and a complete quagmire ffiif several miles. Motorists were compelled tii cut manuka and lay it down ill .order to get along, and for cars to freconie bogged was' »ot, an uncommon exyevience. It was stated that there were 68 English and two French wive* of New Zeiilanders who made the trip out; on : the Briton. A few babies were in evidence, and one stalwart warrior was observed calmly pushing along the wharf ;* "double-seatcr^ go-cart containing twiis;. The 1 appearance on the gangway of ttov Marama as the cot cases were being disembarked <>i a naval officer with a baby' in his arms was greeted with cheers, and one of the laughing crowd called out: "What, another cat case!"

The Poverty Bay Trotting Club recently received notice from the New Zealand Trotting Association that the totylisatoE' permit, temporarily withheld owing f>> the redaction of racing, had. been restored, and asking them to sel'ect a <fate for their next trotting meeting. At a meel • in,g of members last evening, it •*••:■• decided to apply for Saturday, May 30 . and judging by the enthusiasm, everywhere apparent, a prosperous futuir-, seems assured for trotting in Giebomv. The annxtal general meeting -of the 1 clu'i is advertised to be held at the Cosnr ■ -H>lit&n C!ub on Thursday, 13th ■;' 7.45 p.m., and every member, and *U interested in trotting, are urgently xsa- . quested to attend.

The new cool , store; now being cqi * structed by the Gislwyriiie SkeepfAimqvr ■Company at their work's on. Kaiti Jneanng oompiletion' This store coofnpt^ < »*. three rooms, capable of holding" 14,^00 packed carcases. The low«Sr' rcwHr". which will hold 60,000 carcases', HCncr*" available for tise, and meat is , Tbeiir*? placed in it this week. The prbvisk' i' lias h«en made ready only in time lu prevent vh^ otherwise might hare bee a rather ieiioiis position, as the irambera of stock Veoeirable (would! have had :'-» be seriously reduced. The company a®}'siders that with the relief of &nippii*i: it might reasonably be expected to de»*! with clients' stock to the close, of th •• season. '•'.-'

A Gisborne resident who is rootoriu; ' around the North Island has written the following remarks in the visitors' hook at the office of the Tourist and! Expansion League at N«w Plymouth : "Sii?tv< leaving Gisborne we have covered clo;« on 500 miles on all classes of road., without once encountering difficulty ur til we reached Mount Messenger, which; we consider is a disgrace to any district. Can nothing be done to tlr •>. worst parts of this road to make them passable for motorists? As it appear. -• to be the through road to Auckland it is not asking too much to get the wois". mud! holes fasciried. From the appeal; - ance of the road there does not appep' to foe even a surfaceman engaged (»•• the portion that is bad. A road 'in th • state that Mount Messenger is, is a sue.block to tourist motorist."

The question as to whether the pm ~ ■tone- country of this district has been allowed to go back in ebnsequen.ee t war • Conditions was discussedr " Vitlr "".ii Herald, repx'csentative to-day by a loc; > I sheepfarmer. Wheth# it was due % i war conditions or < 'hot, the fact ' iv. ■ mained, he declared, ;thai in some pWt ? of the district, notably -on the^Mores ,• road.' .good, bush l cqufltry js^t^oei seei which has been "pillowed to "go" bat V considerably to fern> iand '"bidi bid) and this he attributed mainly to t: > absence of sufficient cattle. "'"* Gounti'> that was formerly carrying good cocl<--foot has been allowed to go back ttf r : alarming extent. • If something was »«■», done he was afraid the land would;'lncome similar ,to certain areas in tl • Nelson district, where the hillsides Ingone back into fern, and it' -was i heartbreaking task to * tackle.' Incidentally he also referred to the extensive spread of foxglove in the Matawai district, and 1 urged that some attemr ". should be made to cope itftfr thi& we&V Our informant Vent on to 8%; that even if stocking with cattle meant more outlay to a farmer to keep his pasture clean, then it was essential, ,in the interests of the district, it should be done.

Mrs Johnson, of Mangapapa, has received the following kindly letter fron* Second-Lieut. W. McClure, of the 2nd Battalion, N.Z.R.8., dated France, Nov. ay, iyiß: — I ask you to please accept my sympathy in ,your sad lost* of your son, Rifleman E. G. Johnson. ' I quite understand that- any words of mine will do very little towards the healing of the wound you have received. Your son was a member of my, platoon, and although >not a long time with me I soon'got to know him and learned that he was a man worth having. | He was one of my Lewis gunners, » and proved himself »* capable -a-nd brave lad. Wheti we made •our last and very successful Wattle at Lt? Quesnoy on the 4th November 1918 yarn- son was with me, and while using Jus gun against an enemy post he was killed instantaneously by a piece of shell. I was within three yards of him when ho became a casualty) and I knew immediately T had lost one of my best. We buried your son in a little ce'meterv close to the gates of Le Quesnoy, alongside others of our comrades who fell on tho same v day. I sincerely trust, Mi* Johnson, that you •wLM bear your loss with a stout heart and always remember that your dear son lost his life in the great battle for liberty in which our Empire has been fighting for tho pant, four years. Trusting that these humbU* lino? will be accepted in' the spirit . in which they are sent." '

A Christchurch soldier, writing- to » member of the Press staff, under date of December 13th, says: We reached Montignies-sur-Sambre on 7th. This is about 8 kilos, from Charleroi/ and' I had' a look around the town. Business is going on as usual. There are in-' numerable inhabitants, and some very finebmldings. Tn e population is over 20,000, sp you can guess it is some pJace. 1 hence we inarched to Velaine on Bth,, St. Denis on 9th; We left the latter place on 11th, and went td Leuze another sjnall village. While at St. Denis I went into Namuf, which is about the size of Charleroi. Left Leuze for Burdinne on 12th, and on 13lh reached Vinalraont, where I am writiiur from at present. This is a small village, about 15 miles west of Liege. It has been raining fairly consistently during the last. few days, but a march of ten miles m the ram is nothing. The roads are for the most part cood. We continue the march for three more days, from the 17th, and about the 20th will probably take train from, th© German ' frontier to our destination, wherever tn « t .way l>o, probably Cologne. We will have marched "by that time 140 miles (approximately), and. right across ißelgium. "Some walk," I can tell you. We march three days, and then have a spell, and it is -quite all right. Wo are in full marching order, less blanket and leather jerkin.

Our Money-saving Sale is now on. Ladies , Gents' and Children's .Footwear of every description is being offered at' much below ordinary prices. W© shall be pleased to see old customers and new 2" es -T ' H - J- Andi-ew, Marigapapa Boot ohop.* . . '

Nights are drawW in. Wbufabout a, dependable Alarm Clock, 7/6, ,8/6, 12/6, 15/-, 21/-? Qrieve, Jeweller, guarantees his Alarm Clocks.* ' • '

An Engagement Ring well bought, well chosen, gives satisfaction to all par(.ies. Grieve, Jeweller, tries to excel' iii Ins slock of Engagement Rings,* ■■ '

To got glasses that really trait and fil, see Gordon, qualified optician. Latest machinery for rimlesi flaflßM. . Opnoriito B*nk N.2L

The more you talk about the great labo.r-savinig and perfect cleansing qualities of "No Rubbing" Laundry Help, the better it is for everybody, but the inoi'4.you talk about influenza and sucb-/ij|jti(ft-the worse it . ia for etergbod-v^T^^jMiLi^L.

The Ashburton County Council passed I a resolution favoring the construction of a national highway from Auckland to the Bluff as a war memorial. Inland telegrams may now be signed with a Christian name or surname only, or with a pet name or familiar name, provided the telegram is endorsed with the full name and address of the sender. The Acting Chief Postmaster (Mr. P. Curtis) advises: "The Eastern Eoctension Company notify that owing to heavy delay of all classes of traffic, due to increased Government messages 'and interruption, the company regrets it is unable to carry full rate messages either way with and via the United Kingdom. Divert all such messages for the United Kingdom to 'via Pacific* Deferred traffic ib still accepted via Eastern, subject to posting between Marseilles and London!" An elderly native named Raimona Tekirikau was accidentally killed at Witao (Bay of Plenty) on Monday of last week. Raimona, who was about 76 years of age, left his home to get a load of firewood. As he was some time away two of his relatives went in search and found that the horse had apparently failed to get the load up a short, sharp hill, and in attempting to : back the load had capsized, and when found Raimona was underneath the load, quite dead, with the rail of the dray on his head. The horse was also on his back. In the course of hia evidence at the Court of Inquiry,, in Christchurch, which is investigating the causes of a • fatal tramway accident in June last, Mr. E. P. Turner, the Christchurch tramways engineer, stated that everything breakable on the cars was broken at some time or other by the Board's employees. Windows^ which cost £2 or £3 apiece, were broken almost. daily. It cost the Board approximately £2000 per annum to replace or repair small breakages on ■ the cars. The witness stated that he did not' suggest that these breakages were intentional. They were probably due to the high rate of speed the men had to work at on certain lines.

The total post and telegraph revenue collected at Gisborne for the quarter ending December 31 last amounted to £8757, as against £8477 for the corresponding period of 1917 and £8045 for December quarter 1916. The last quarter's revenue showed an increase in telegraphic and telephonic revenue, being £4368, compared to £4097 from these sources in the December quarter of 1917. The postal revenue amounted to £4388 (as against £4379), and included private bag and box rents £48, money order commission £106, postages £4191 postal note commission £42. The amount deposited in the post office savings bank for the quarter amounted to £109,611, the withdrawals being £80,149, leaving a surplus lodged of £29.462. For the December quarter, £103,959 was "deposited, the surplus over withdrawals being £17,864.

At the motor by-laws conference in the Borough Council Chambers yesterday afternoon, Mr. S. S. Dean quoted clause 9 of the Motor Regulations 1 Act, which ■was as follows: Every person commits an offence who drives a motor on a public highiway recklessly or negligently, or at a speed or in a manner which is dangerous to the public, having regard to all the circumstances of the case, including the nature, condition, and use of the highway, and the amount of the traffic which actually is at the time , or which might reasonably be expected to b© on the highway. — After further discussion it was decided to fix the a^e of taxi-drivers at 21 years, and of private iriveiß at 17 years. For motor cycle Irivers the age was fixed at 16 yeara. — Afn C. Perry : You don't fix any maximum age? (Laughter.) — It was decided to refer the decisions to a further conference. .

The Minister of Mines, the Hoh. W. D. S. MacDonald, was asked by a representative of the Christchurch Press what the prospects "were of greater supplies of coal l>eing available. "So far as increased output is concerned," Mr. MacDonald replied, "it should be helped by the return of the large number of miners at present at the front. As to supplies from Australia, they will depend largely upon what dimensions the epidemic assumes. The Minister of Munitions, the Minister of Railways, and myself are keeping in touch with the position throughout the Dominion, especially with respect to the quantity of coal required to maintain the industries of the Dominion, and we are using every endeavor to arrive at means where/by the Dominion's industries can be maintained in the meantime. The matter has been difficult for the last two years— very difficult. Last winter shipping was held up to such, an extent that the miners were putting in only eight days per fortnight. During the past two months there has been plenty of shipping available, but what between the epidemic — unfortunately a number of miners succumbed — and the holidays, there was only a very small output. The men are not yet all back to work, but the bulk of them have started." "Three Years iwitfa the New Zealanders" is the title of a book written by Colonel Weston. of New Plymouth, and published at Home last month. Colonel Weston'e book is plain, straightforward history — a modest record of one part of th© Dominion's doings in the tragic warfare now happily silenced, ranging through training in Egypt, the evacuation of Gallipoli, and on. active service on '" Samme, Messines Ridge, La Basse Viiie, and Passchendaele. Colonel "Weston does not spare himself or his men n his criticism. He thinks the padres lave not done all they could, but, on the ,*ther hand, "we officers," he says, "do /lot appeal to the ethical side of the men enough." In summing , up, he says: "The training anid experience will prove, in the majority of cases, a great benefit. Discipline is its mainspring, because all reasonable men realise the times call for it. Method is another plank .in the Army platform, and, above all, a monotonous insistence upon . everything being done in the best possible wa.y. Slipshod work is anathema, and it '"is precisely these three qualities that a young, inde- , pendent nation requires. We have been ; pushed out into the world! (while very \ young, and we have been successful. 'Under such circumstances we must have 'discipline, methodical organisation, and the highest standard before tis, if we hope to fulfil the destiny fate has given us."

A most enjoyable social was given by Mrs. Horsfall and Mr. and Mrs. Balconer last night to welcome Privates J. Kape (Mrs. Horsf all's brother) and Douglas Falconer, also Sergeant Barwick and Privates J. and H. Hamilton, and Rangi Wiruni, who have just returned from the front. Mrs. Horsfall's woolshed was prettily .decorated with evergreens, tree ferns, and flags for the occasion. Lady Carroll, who came out early in the "evening, had to return with her guests, Mesdames Bevan and Oarr. Mr. and Mrs. T. Halbert also came out and returned with them. 'Songs were contributed' by Misses Ferris, D. Kain, and. Mrs. Pitt, and by Messrs. Hamilton and Pakeiturea. Extras were played by Misses Ferris, A. Kirkpatrick, Mrs. Qninn, and Mr. Wirerangi. A recitation/ toast to Anzac was given by Miss Kathleen Horsfall. Attractive items were glees — one a lament for the fallen soldiers — conducted by Captain and Mrs. Pitt. Mr. Kanituhoe contributed excellent music for the dance, and also acted as accompanist. Sergeant Barwick. who served in the East, and Private Falconer, who served on the West front, each received serious leg wounds, from which it is hoped they will eventually comnletely recover. Mr. Kain thanked the hostesses and host, and on their behalf nxtended a cordial welcome to the boys from the front, for whom Captain- Pitt appropriately replied.— (Correspondent.)

The Farmers' Co-op, have taken over the Giaborne and' Tolaga Agency fov the International Harvester Coy., recently held by Mr W. O. Lon*?.*

Cars are scarce and the price Trot likely to come down,. The Farmers' Co-op, have an Oakland car landed. Demonstration given.*

Gift* for everybody, Wm'Bt watehen, nigmet rirtflf*, silver pencils, cameo brooshw, *t QorcWu. opposite Ban*

' The average daily consumption of j water for the City of Auckland during 1918 was 5,550,000 gallons.

Shortly after the signing of the armistice Invereargill wholesale softgoods firms received advice of an all-round drop of 75 per cent, on 'Japanese productions for forward delivery.

While riding in the Maiden Plate at Tauranga recently, an apprentice named Hamilton had his leg broken just above the ankle through being struck by a swinging stirrup iron of a horse that had fallen.

The Mayor of Masterton, who is just back from Australia, states that the cost of living is cheaper in Australia than in New Zealand. More particularly is this the case in respect to bread, meat, clothing, and boots and shoes.

A Masterton tradesman told an Age reporter that while motor oars and parts could now be purchased in America on consignment, English and Scotch firms required spot cash on delivery. "Is there any wonder," he asked, "that America is getting, a strong hold on New Zealand! trade?"

As a result of representations made to Mr. McDonald, of the Board of Trade, by the Nelson Egg Circle during his recent visit to Nelson, arrangements were immediately put in hand for the delivery of Australian wheat in Nelson at a price which will leave a margin of profit to egg-producers.

An unusual case, as far as Napier is concerned, is set down for hearing, at the Supreme Court, when one party will ask for an ordefr detefrmininjg that one R. N. Donaldson may be presumed dead. It is understood that Donaldson has been on the "disappeared" list for over 20 years.

A New Plymouth resident has received a letter from a relative in England, stating on the authority of a lady doctor that a conference of medical practitioners had arrived at the conclusion that the influenza epidemic was caused by the Germans, who had distributed the germs by means of bombs.

At the present time Mr. T. H. Rhodes, of Manchester, is touring New Zealand, taking kinematograph pictures for the Gaumont Film Corporation. Mr. Rhodes left for the Southern Lakes district. He will '> stay there for some time, and he will then go to the Mount Cook region to secure some views of alpine scenery to show in America.

Enquiries made from bank managers in Gbxistchurch by a Lyttelton Times reporter, regarding the position of girl clerks now that the war is over, elicited the information that they would, not be allowed to stand in the way of the returning members of their staffs. The general opinion was that a large number of the girls would have to go, but the best of them would be retained.

A lady connected with the New Zealand Red Cross in London, writing to a friend in Dunedin, states that on Armistice Day nearly every New Zealand man to whom she spoke in the Netley hospitals, while expressing joy at the fact that the war was over, remarked: "Oh, but we feel so sorry for the poor mothers in New Zealand, for there will be many sad hearts." Underneath the men's joy, the lady adds, there was the kindly feeling for those who would never again see their loved ones.

Mr. J. O. Cooper informed a meeting of farmers in Masterton that prior to the war first grade tallow was selling at £35 per ton on the English market. The highest price reached during the war was £72 per ton. Owing io a shortage of Home shipping, a consignment had been sent by the Wellington Farmers' Meat Company to America, which was sold at £64. The price has now dropped 40 per cent, in America, and when the 17,000 casks held in New Zealand reached England they would ' " • -k the bottom out of the market

'vVhen will the amusement tax be lifted?" That is a question at present agitating the minds of several people connected with the show business (says the Dominion). The matter is not so much the ratio of increase entailed in the price of admisson as it is the awkwardness entailed upon the public and the management in dealing with the odd penoe at the .ticket boxes. The total yield from this tax approximates £40,000, but -what it costs to collect that sum may discount the value of the tax. It is generally supposed that this is one iform of taxation which will be reconsidered as soon as peace is formally signed.

The news of the armistice was sourly received by the German residents of Samoa. Some of the better-class settlers were so convinced of the invulnerability of the Kaiser that they absolutely declined to believe the newis. With the German armies well into the heart of France the thought of a German surrender seemed to them utterly ridiculous. The New Zealand officers simpJy replied : "Wait and see." One of the leading settlers, a planter, when told the news, said : "Bah ! You can never beat th© Germans. The Kaiser will win, and he will boss the world. I don't believe your news !" And after formally reporting himself, he went away scowling. In another instance a German, on being told the news, "was seized with an agony of rage, to appease which he was informed that there were a million and a half of Allied troops already on garrison duty in Berlin, which turned the Buns' rage into a violent flood of tears, interspersed with "Ach, Himmel !" and incomprehensible cries of emotional agony in German.

The Wanganui Chronicle's Ruatiti correspondent had an opportunity of seeing Mr. W. Vella, the world s champion shearer, in action on Thursday week, at a station in Ruatiti, owned by Messrs. O'Neill Bros., of Wanganui. He says: Mr. Vella is a member of Mr. Skinner's contract^ party of ■ five, the other members being' Messrs. Hulena. Swan, and Dowling 1 . The "cfrummer" of this party can shear his 270 sheep per day quite comfortably, while Mr. Vella, the "ringer/' holds the world's record of 347 for a nine-hours' day, he having recently beaten his previous record of 339. This party arrived at Messrs. O'Neill Bros.' shed during the previous week, and in eight days had shorn well over 10,000 sheep. A large number of visitors came daily from near and far to see these champions at work, and it is indeed a. revelation to see the marvellous speed with which a sheep^ can be divested of his heavy fleece without receiving as much as a scratch from the shearer- On one occasion when Mr. VeUa seemed to be going at top, though not knowing that I was timing him, he dropped th© fleece off a sheep in just 46 secondb from th© time he took up his machine till he laid it down again. I do not know how many seconds h© could knock off this time if he were racing the clock.

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Bibliographic details

Poverty Bay Herald, Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 14829, 5 February 1919

Word Count
4,205

Poverty Bay Herald Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 14829, 5 February 1919

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