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THE DERBY RA CE.

1 .. i , - , j*_>| '' y...i>. yMAGNIFICENT SCENE

"A .MADDENED FAVORITE.'

London papers to; hand by, -the mail bring full details, of .he race for the English Derby, at Epsom .on' May 28. The following accouiit is from the Daily Telegraph : — The King audi Queen and everybody saw an astonishing Derby. It was a race that < scented to leave a mighty crowd of people cold.- Tf was' a silent Derby ; anything approaching unbounded enthusiasm was entirely and completely absent. There was just one little half-shy cheer when Mi* H. B. Din-yea's Durbar 11. finished first, three' lengths m front of the neat and natty Hapsburg, with Mr H. J. King's Peter 'the Hermit, who, by.-th.e-- way, Was not among the probables, third:' It was not' the I 'Sorry failure of Kennymore, the favorite, that chilled the people; no one would- begrudge such "a' fine sportsman as Mr .Duryea. his success; rather Mas it because they found themselves m a foreign Derby atmosphere. There was some subtle, indefinable influence at woricj that made them strangely phlegmatic. They were a tense, apprehensive, and not a joyous people. The possibility of trouble by the suffragettes robbed them of a sense of freedom. Happily, there was no repetition of- the lamentable occurrence of a year ago, though just before the Derby "was run a young woman, whose name is said to bo Ada Rice, fired a pistol at a policeman when she, '' With other's, was requested to -leave the- course. She was promptly seized and led away, fortunately without a scene or commotion, and only those who were'- on' the spot had the faintest notion 'of what had happened. Still, the day long one could not free oneself from the possibility of trouble. Wild women became an obsession, and left people, accustomed to make a rollicking holiday of the Derby, sullen. It was a Derby crowd, one might say with only the least exaggeration, that was m a' temper — a crowd that would have been ' happy, but couldn't..- ••' "' '-A

Because of its color, its vastness and because of each and every class of people it embraced, ihe scene loii,^ before the Derby was run was' a magnificent" one. Only at Epsom and only on Derby Day could, the like of it have been. ; Each and every stand was packed;": oh the hill opposite the Royal box there seemed to have sprung np a little "world that ■was shut' off from so. many ether little •worlds. And >at Tattenham '"'.•Corner there appeared tb. be more people than ever before;' " ;; •'"" ■■■'••"'-

When the Derby candidate's " entered the paddock, Sir John Thursby's.. colt Kennymofe — a ' strikingly handsome horse — came m for most/attention, and though there ' was some .. fear regarding his temper, he was never "m any danger of being deposed from the position of favorite. The field, of 30 saddled up to contest .the'-'Uhie riband was the largest since Hermit's year m 1867. •When the horses filed on to the course m one long line, with' "his "Majesty's Brakespear at the head; th© specta.leywas a truly imposing one. '■ ■ ". •-■ - * > -.-.'.' .

. THE RACE. THE DERBY STAKES, of 6500 sovs7 for three-year-olds ; nominator of 'winner receives . 500 *ovs, second -400 soys, ahd .bird 200 soys. About one mile and a half. 1 •■'"'-'." Mr H. B. Diiryea's Durbar 'TL, by Rabelais — Armenia (M. Macgeejj... 1 Sir E. Cassel's Hapsbihg 1 , by Desmond — Altesse.(C. Foy) ... 2 Mr H. J- King's Peter the Hermit, by St. 'Petersburg— Carlin (R. Watson) ' ';'.'.. ..'.'... '6 Lord Derby's Dau -RUssell * "... :.. 4 Lord St. David's My Prince ... 5 His Majesty's Brakespear* ... '6 M_* J. B, Joel'srßlaok Jester ... 7 Lord Carnarvon's Maygdr 8 Mr E. Tanner's Carancho ... ... 9 Mr L. Neumann's Lanius ... ... 10 Sir J. Thursby's Kenny more ... 11. Duke of Portland's Anglesey .... •_ 0 Sir Abe Bailey's Ambassador ... 0 Mr H. P. Nicalls'S Best Boy ... 0 Colonel Hall Walker's Carrickfergus 0 Mr W. _v. McMillan's Cerval ... 0 Mi* J. W. Larnach's Conqueror ... 0 Mr W. Clark's Courageous ... 0 Til:.. A _tim/-iiit7o. riniuVlmi ... ... 0

JMA __• AMJIIVUVO wupmuit ... ... ~ Mr Hahn's 'Desmond's -Sour ... 0 'Mr K. Jones's Ev&usdale, ... .... 0 Mr George Edwardes's Flying Orb ... 0 Mr J. Buchanan's Marten ... ... 0 Mr W. Brodribk-doete's Orebi ... 0 Ml* Rusgel's Polycrates 0 Mr F.. Marsliani-Townsheiid's Polygamist ' 0 Mi- L. de Rothschild's St. Guthlac ... 0 Colonel E. W. Baird's Shepherd King 0 Mr Tatem's Southern down ....... 0 Ma* HultonV WlJ6d%Vild ...''' .'.: 0 ■ Thei'e was .a!, tiresome delay at the post. The starter, Mr Willoughby, had to deal with a situation such as his predecessors m office never had knbwledge of . Here were 30 .overwrought thoroughbreds being squeezed . into a lane, and as tehiper and fright among them are "infectious , it ••' wa¥ - -hot. lopfg bef 6¥e some of them had lashed themselves into a hopeless state of fury. If the starter liad waited fbr them .all to draw up m a solid, unbroken line; he and the' '3o would have been there yet. The lbhger lie waited the worse the situation Dc- y came. For a time Kennymore was fairly sober. Then 'the favorite began to break out He started bj* making little rushes backwards and to Wing and pivot on his hind legs. Time after' time O'Neill brought him back to the nad position; lie had drawn on the outside. .. Fifteen minutes passed, and by that time lie was thoroughly roused. He shied and jumped away 'from '-the dense crowds lining the rails oh either side of the ctfurs^ hereabouts. The long ordeal of tln> mobbing m the paddock, the solemn parade, and the slow progress across the thicklypopulated ravine to the start had, begun to tell, aiid soon lie had given way altogether, and stood out as a maddened favorite. When Mr WiUdufcftby Had performed the formality, of his office by pulling the lever and releasing the horses what a spectacle was there! Instead of leaving iv the ideal way, each as well served as the other,- they. began~ their struggle like horses finishing an irregular cavalry charge.' No need was there to look twice for the favorite. • Kennymore's colors were conspicuous m the rear. The horse had swung round as the tapes flew upwards, and had therefore been left. "The favorite's left!" What a world of dreadful meaning was conveyed by the shouted words, and what a pang smot-e upon all who, m the interests of sport, apart from any other consideration, wanted to see him have a fair chance

to justify himsolf. Tragedy, there.w as enough m that. But- that was not all. The King's colt, Brakespear, was also left. He had not begun to move when those first away were a hundred yards m frohtV-Polycrates,' Black Jester, Flying Orb/: Durbar 7lL, and, others alUtearing along. At tlie 'mile' post Brakespear had only one "librse behind him. In front of '■ him "- were 28, and from that point the horse "had,, to be threaded m and*, out aniongst , hopeless animals that had no pretensions' to be whero they were, except that they were eligible through the mere fact of entry. ' When Tattenham Corner was reuehed Magyar ran Wide, and Black Jester was m command, but when' heads were fairly m a line' for home Durbar 11. dashed into the lead, followed by' Black Jester",' Dan Russell, Hapsburg, Rrakespear and Peter the Hermit. At the distance Hapsbhr'g ran into second place, 1 -but though he struggled on . gamely he could not reach the French colt,' who* won easily by three .'lengths^ . A length and a half separated second and third.- Time, 2.38 2-5.

It is '. a popular opinion that m 'an even start tho King's colt Brakespear \voiiJd 'have been very* close to .the ' Derby winner ' if 'he did not actually reach the posb first. It \vas not tho horse's 'fault. He had • stood • the ordeal well, but 'it was his overwhelming misfortune when tho start took place fur the horses- on either side to close on him like the inverter letter "V." Jones, on Brakespear. could not move "until -they had first drawn clear. The jockey was crestfallen and grievously 'disappointed. "There -is not. an 'if about it,'** he Bunso<im*ntly' to.d'Mr Marsh, the horse's trainer; "I 'must havo won easily." How enormous whs the difference it made. aßßiinvine the joclcey is correct, as I believe hini to be. eon bo left to the imagination ol readers. An historic

Se'e'tifi ! would- -have been enacted through the first victory m the Derby for his present Majesty. -.-

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19140703.2.44

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY RACE., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLI, Issue 13423, 3 July 1914

Word Count
1,398

THE DERBY RACE. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLI, Issue 13423, 3 July 1914

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