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400,000 SEE DERBY.

WELSHERS AND THE BUBLIC.

(Press Assn.—By Telegraph— Copyright.) (London Times and Sydney Sun Services.} LONDON, Juno 4. . Alleged "welshing" is rampant at Hurst Park. One. bookmaker distributed" handbills, announcing hUn_elf-a--r a former chorister of th-vprfittitp chapel at Windsor, and that he san_ at the wedding of King Edward. .- -"■ -- ■

LONDON, May 28. The attendance" at ' the '/Derby yesterday- was about 400,000. The' Queen's gown Mas covered with an ermine niahtle, and she wore also a white hat. The King was entertained by the Jockey Club at dinner. There, was some excitement between welshers and tho public. The police rescued several defaulting bookmakers. One, who disappeared after the first race, left his motor car behind, and the infuriated bettors turned, it upside down,. set fire to it. and stole the axles-, mudguards, and pump. Yesterday's Derby was memorable for several things, .among them being the astonishing , defeat of the favorites, the winning of the race by a French horse, the large size of ! the field, and the fact that there was no unseemly disturbance of the event by the militant suffragettes. There were 30 starters, this being the largest number since 1867.

The weather was fine and cool, though tho i sun shone brilliantly, ' and all the conditions were ideal. All roads led to Epsom, and there .was a continuous stream of racegoers along . the main Toads from London, all manner of vehicles being brought into requisition. The principal, feature of the traffic was--the unusually large number of motor 'buses that proceeded direct from Westminster to Epsom. Thousands went by special train from Victoria Station, and from, this terminus the. King and Queen and their guestg travelled. Their Majesties were enthusiastically cheered when they arrived at the course.

SOCIETY PRESENT IN FORCE.

.There was a greater proportion of society present than was expected, and the gathering on the lawns "and m the stands resembled Royal Ascot, because at the last moment the Queen changed her mind and decided to attend.

The popular hope was that the' King's horse, Breakspear, would win.

The result was a complete surprise arid) w-as as follows: .

Mr H. B. Duryea's b c Durbar 11. , by Rabelais— Armenia (M'Gee) ; 1 Mr H. Cholmondeley's br c Hapsburg, by Desmond— Altesse (Foy) 2 Mr H. J. King's c c Peter the Hermit, by St. , Petersburg — Carlin (Watson) 1.. ... :.. 2

Betting : 9 to A against 'Kennymore, 10 to 1 Black Jester. 12 to 1 Break-s-pear, 20 to 1. Durbar 11., 33 to 1 Hapsburg, 103 to 1 Peter the Hermit. "Durbar 11. won by three • lengths, with one length and a. half between the second and third horses. The time was 2min 38 2-sth sec.

Peter the Hermit was not considered a probable starter, but at the eleventh hour his owner decided to race.

DISAPPOINTING RACE, "

Spectacularly* -the race was disappointing. There wag a delay of 21 minutes at tlie' tpost owing to a- false start, and the fractiousness of the favorite and Flying Orb and Breakspear. Kcnnymore kicked out m all directions, and at last had fo be sent to the outside podtion by the starter. ' They began stragglihgly, the King's horse being left .several lengths m the rear, ; while Kennymore was hopelessly out of the hunt when the others got going, and never had a real chance.' Polycratcs was tii'& out of the barrier, well away from Flying Orb, with Black Jester, and Durbar 11. nicely placed, and Hapsburg and P( tor the Hermit forcing their way th' widx the ruck. Kennymore improved h!s position after tlie five furlongs ] !<.>:'. '•: .;! been passed, but he only lessen*. ■■ t':" distance between himfclf, and t! ! .-' leaders by the merest trifle. Descending the hill, Durbar 11. drew nearer to the front, and took up the running on entering the straight. .He won with ridiculous ease and was never pressed. Breakspear finished sixth, Black Jester s-eventh, and Kennymore twelfth. The result was a. tremendous turn-up the bookmakers, and the crowd seemed stunned and silent at the victory of 'the outsider. The only other Fvench horse that lias ever Avon the Derby was Count Lag-, range's Gladiatetir m 1865. A LUCKY OWNER. Mr Duryea ist^-a wealthy American who went to Fra_i.ce and established a stud farm when "the anti-betting laws were enforced m New York. In 1912 . he won the Two Thousand Guineas, and m 1913! his horses were successful m 12 .-.-races., and he captured £15,000 m stakes. The winner is _n unimposing looking animal, and, curiously enough, was number 13 on the card. -* . ■ The bait?-, offered by holders of horses m tlie big .Calcutta' Turf Club sweep were considered, responsible for, the starting of many horses that had no chance of winning., NEVER HAD -VN EASIER RACE. Interviewed "after the race, M'Gee, who piloted the winnetv home, declared that he never had an easier race m his life. ''The Epsom course," he said, "had no terrors for me." N Mr Duryea- the* owner of Durbar, 11. was naturally proud of . his win. •' "I knew," he said, "that my horse would make a better showing than he did m the French Two Thousand Guineas on May 17. The course suited him better, and, he *can stay for ever. His fire, Rabelais, was considered tho best racehorse sire m Europe.' "I am delighted,' added' Mr Duryea, "to have got something baok over the golf championship." PRECAUTIONS AT EPSOM. ; The most elaborate precautions were taken to prevent- any outrage*? on the .p^art of the ./suffragettes. .At the Tottenham corner :the crowd : was separated from the course by a triple line of rails several feet apart* Hundreds of police were stationed 'at . this part of the course, and a repetition of last year's tragedy, when the woman Davidson was skilled "while attempting to stop • the •King's horse, was therefore mado impossible. The only untoward incident of the day occurred when Ada Rice, a militant, fired from a revolver a blank cartridge at tho policeman who wa~ clearing the course before the Derby wag run. The weapon was discharged at close quarters, so close that the flash burnt the constable's. clothes and injured his leg. The woman was arrested.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19140605.2.55

Bibliographic details

400,000 SEE DERBY., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLI, Issue 13399, 5 June 1914

Word Count
1,023

400,000 SEE DERBY. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLI, Issue 13399, 5 June 1914

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