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A GREAT GAME.

TARANAKI'S POPULAR WIN,

"SCENE BEGGARS DESCRIPTION."

The finest, match from a spectacular point of view, and the most exciting as to incident arid varying fortunes, ever witnessed m the history of the Ranfurly Shield, was Saturday's game between Taranakl and Auckland. How the challengers won their way to victory m the last few minutes, when it looked as though the fates were temporarily against them, is a story that will go down to posterity. Quite the most pleasing feature of the match was the astonishing reception the winners got m the enemy's camp. All through the game the barracking was more pronounced for Taranakl than for the home team, and when the Una! bell rang the scene that ensued beggars description, cheer after cheer greeting the southerners, while an excited mob rushed them, carrying the hulk of the players off the field shoulder high to their dressing room. After dressing, as the players left for their brake, Mr Sheahan, chairman of the committee of the Auckland Rugby Union, called for three cheers for the visitors, which the crowd gave with great heartiness, and the outbreak could not have been greater had Auckland been the victors. When the team returned to their quarters at the Royal Hotel, a crowd of about 300 was waiting to welcome them, and they again received an ovation.

Taranakl's forwards were magnificent, and they beat the Auckland pack •m every department of the game, especially m line-out work and the open. They showed tremendous dash and pace, and time after time they swept over the local vanguard, a lot of scores, however, being lost through over-eagerness.

The Auckland forwards were good m the heavy work, but they failed to hold their own when the ball got free, and their loose rushes could be counted on one hand. In the first spell it was hardly anything, but Taranaki, and they swept flown the field m great style. The defence of the. Auckland backs was soundly tested. The Auckland's three-quarter line and full-back did a lot of stopping, but there was a weakness m the five-eighth and centre-half, and they failed to get down to the rushes This enabled the visitors to open up the play, and they threw .the ball about m a manner that brought continued applause from the crowd, who cheered the visitors for, their fine work.

m .the second spell Auckland were expected to rise to the occasion, but Taranakl maintained their fine form, and with half the 45 minutes gone had rattled on six points, and led by nine to five. Auckland then rallied, and their combination for about a quarter of an hour was more like their true form than at any stage of the game. They attacked continually, and the backs, getting possession, tries came as the result of passing runs, McGregor and Weston being the scorers, and Auckland's luck appeared to be m, Ipr with only abeut 10 minutes to go the totals were Auckland 11, Taranaki .9. The visitors were, however, playing it out to the bitter end, and, coming down the field with a combined rush, the ball was sent to Hill,, on the wing, and the latter centring, the forwards carried it over with a passing run. Roberts got possession, and was awarded the. try. .. Hawkins goaled, and Taranakl were to 11, amidst a scene of unparalleled excitement that was repeated when. the bell rang to cease, play a fe\y minutes after. Taranaki J's forwards gained them the victory, and thus, jli*^ spito of the fact that for a quarter of an hour prior to their winning rush they appeared to be tiring, giving many the impression that the local team was gokig to win through sheer lasting powers. i

Taylor, on the wing, was a host m himself, and gave a great display of wing forward work. Certainly no better man has been seen m Auckland for some time, and one wonders how. lie missed the New Zealand team. Dewar, Hawkins, Whit-

tington, and Tamu were m the thick of it all the time, but the whole pack deserve every credit. The backs, considering the [chances th.cy got, were not up to expectations, and several times they had opportunities that went begging through want of dash. Loveridge m particular was a disappointment, but probably too much was expected from him on account of the reports received ol his play. Brown, behind the pack, was easily the picK, and he did. a lot of work in* a first class manner. The Auckland forwards were a long way below standard, and have never been seen to less advantage. The only time they really approached their true form was about- half-way through the second spell, when they looked like outstaying their opponents. '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19130820.2.73

Bibliographic details

A GREAT GAME., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XL, Issue 13159, 20 August 1913

Word Count
796

A GREAT GAME. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XL, Issue 13159, 20 August 1913

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