Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image

GREAT GALE.

EXCITING RESCUE SCENES ROUND ! ENGLISH COAST. LIFEBOAT CAPSIZED. LONDON, January 15. | In all parts of the country a fierce gale raged on Wednesday night and Thursday. It gave rise to many exciting rescue scenes round the coast, ancLj unfortunately, was the causA of loss of life. A particularly sad fatality occurred m Black friars-road, where the coping of a public-house, dislodged by the wind, fell, killing one school teacher and injuring another. t At Deal there was an. exciting scene, 'the lifeboat being capsized m the rough sea. Squalls of snow were experienced m London at frequent intervals during the day, and there were heavy falls m the North and Midlands. Owing to tne north-easterly gale there was an exceptionallj' high tido m the Thames on Thursday. Highwater mark was reached over an hour and a half before it was due. CRUSHED TO DEATH. One woman was killed another seriously hurt about nine o'clock on Thursday morning by the fall m Great Charlotto street of the coping of the Railway Tavern, which stands at the corner of Blackfriars road and Great Charlotte street. Among the passers-by were two school teachers at the ■ Gray street Schools, near by, one of whom, Mrs Sheehan, of Harlescott road, Nunhead, was killed outright, her body being terribly crushed. Her companion, Mrs Whiteman, wife of the headmaster of a. school m Dulwich, was taken to St. Thomas's Hospital with a fractured leg. It is estimated that about four tons of masonry fell, and it is presumed that the heavy wind had loosened it. As it came down it carried with, it signboards and lamps, smashing them to atoms, and also breaking^ the plate-glass windows of the public-house. The inhabitants of the neighborhood thought an earthquake had happened, and came rushing to the doors of their shops and houses. The coping-stone and brickwork carried away occupied about 100 ft of the front of the tavern and the Carmen's, Rest eating-house adjoining. ASHORE ON THE HOOK. The Hull steamer Selby Abbey, engaged m the passenger service between tho Humber and Rotterdam, went ashore m the gale at the entrance to the New Waterway on the Hook of Holland (the spot where the Berlin was lost with 140 lives m February, 1907. When she went ashore the Selby Abbey carried ten passengers. These were got ashore, but at night the master, chief officer, two engineers, two firemen, the steward, the donkeynian, and the cook still remained on board. The Selby Abbey is a steel screw steamer of over 1000 tons, belonging to the Hull and Netherlands Steamship Company. She was built by Earles, of Hull, m 1902. LIFEBOAT TURNED OVER, The hurricane blew "fiercely m the Channel, and the seas were running higher than they have done for years. Many ships were m distress. A thrilling scene was witnessed on the beach at x^orth Deal. When flares were observed lrom a sinking schooner, _which had been m collision, and was lying less than a mile lrom the shore, a tug went to ncr assistance, but could not get a hawser aboard owing to the rough weather. The North L»eal lifeboat was launched from tho beach, but, despite the desperate exertions of the crew and those on shore, the mountainous seas rolled completely over the lifeboat, and ljnally knocked her broadside on the Joresnore. Alter a most exciting scene, during which the boat was capsized by the waves, her head was turned to the incoming seas, and she was successfully got afloat. The lifeboat then tried to reach the distressed vessel by making long tacks, and eventually got alongside aim took her m tow. SMACK SUNK AT DOVER. The Colchester smack Christabel dragged her anchors and ran foul of the Admiralty Pier, at Dover, just missing the mail packet Empress. The crew were rescued by the steamer's crew and people on the pier, by means of ' ropes ana rope ladder. Soon after the last man was rescued the smack heeled over and sank, x A schooner* which was ondriven on to the Admiralty Pier, was towed clear by the tug Lady Crundall. All telephonic communication with Dover was cut off owing to the damage done to tho lines by the. great gale. 1 The Floreo, of Macio, Brazil, bound from Hamburg with a general cargo, ■went ashore otf <W aimer." Attempts are being made to rescue the crow by the rocket apparatus. At Herue Bay tho sea swept tho front and flooded the side streets. The barge Thames was driven ashore opposite the clock tower, and one man was washed overboard and drowned.' His body has not yot been recovered. A lino was thrown to his mate, who was pulled through the surf to shore. The River Stour overflowed its banks at Sandwich. The quays were impassable, and boats could be rowed m the adjoining marshes. A great loss of cattle \s feared. . SOLE SURVIVOR IN RIGGING. Sheerness Recreation Ground and the Beach Gardens were flooded by the sea, which rose four feet above its normal level. Coastguards at Leysdown went to the assistance of the Cecil Rhodes, under Warden Point. All the drew, with the exception of one, who had climbed into the . rigging, had been '{frowned. Owing to the heavy seas the coastguards could not reach the vessel. The Norwegian steamer Daggry, and the bargo Phoenix, of Rochester, collided oft Cliffe Creek, Gravesend. The latter foundered, and the mato\ was drowned. i 'Owing to the heavy seas, the battleship Formidable could not be received at Chathm Dockyard, and was ordered to anchor m the Medway. Tho Yarmouth and Gorleston lifeboats were called out on Thursday, and the Gorleston boat took"" off the crew of Iho Goole schooner Volant, whose anchors -had dragged. The Yarmouth boat rendered assistance to the schooner Enterprise, whose anchors could not hold, but tho vessel was eventually brought up off the south beach. WAVES ONE HUNDRED FEET HIGH. The Holyhead lifeboat was called out to assist the Dublin steamer Bushnill, which had - drifted on the Penrhos beach, one of the most dangerous places on the Anglesey coast. Seventeen of the crew were rescued, the captain and x two mates refusing to leave. Other vessels were m distress off Holyhead: ■ Tho schooner Fox, of Runcorn, was driven on Saddle Point, off Fishguard, and. is likely to become a. total wreck. Five, men were rescued by rocket apparatus. Waves a hundred feet high were dashing over the breakwater, and the entrance to the port is so dangerous Chat tho Rosslare turbine steamer .was unable to enter. Tho G.W.R. cros9-Channel . steamer St. David experienced the full force of the gale while crossing from. Rosslare to Fishguard, and two; seamen were washed overboard and drowned. Tho schooner Hilda, of Faversham, entered the Humber, on Wednesday, leaking very badly. The captain ran her ashore on the rocks, but she was blown off. The captain then beached her on Clee Ness, and flew distress signals. These were observed At Gramsby on Thursday, and the captain and five hands were" taken off. It is expected that the schooner will be refloated and docked. ; The Lymington steamer was unable to land her passengers at Yarmouth (Isle of Wight) owing to the stormy weather. At Cbwes and East Cowes the streets Were flooded, ' and the floating bridge was damaged. Breaking from her anchorage m Alderney roadstead the ketch Charles Ellison,' of Rochester, drifted- on to the rocks behind the jetty, rind will become a complete wreck. The steamer Bur ton is also m a • perilous condition on Braye Sands. Calais is sported as being unapproachable, and it is probable that the mail steamers will have to make Boulogne their starting point. SNOW IN THE NORTH. A severe storm of wind' and snow rugetl m the Orkney Islands,- and all mail traffic with the mainland of Scotland was intefrnpted. In North Derbyshire the gale was (accompanied by snow and bitter cold.

The hills of the Peak district are cover- 1 ed with snow which is drifting. I Wild weather was experienced at Haweß Junction and the surrounding district. At one time the telegraphic communication was completely cut off, but this was restored. The gale was accompanied by a heavy fall of snow. All outside work at the shipyards m the Tyneside district was suspended, and traffic m the streets could only be carried on with difficulty. Snow fell for several hours* m North Wales on Thursday. The traffic m the uplands was greatly impeded. During the height of the gale at Nottingham a three-storeyed building, tenanted by Messrs J. Pidcock and Co., Ltd., maltsters, collapsed with a deafening crash, and sleepers m neighboring houses rushed out, fearful of an earthquake. The street was rendered impassable by the fallen masonry and brickwork. The damage amounts to several thousand pounds. CROWDS "WATCH SHIP FOUNDER. The Glasgow sailing ship Arden Craig foundered off Scilly on Monday m full view of crowds of people on the mainland. . Early m the afternoon distress guns were fired from the Bishop Lighthouse, and the St. Agnes and St. Mary's lifeboats were soon afloat. There was thick fog at the time, but soon afterwards tho fog cleared and a large ship was seen m Broad Sound. She had apparently bieen ashore, but was seen drifting m a wild sea with her foreyard aback. After being the sport of the wind and waters for a full hour she heeled over to port and disappeared. The crew had, fortunately taken to the boats and landed safely. The Arden Craig was from Queenstown, with a cargo of wheat. She was built m Greenock m 1886, had a registered tonnage of 1969, and had as managing owner Mr Robert J. Mowat, of 19. Wellington street, Glasgow. In an interview Captain Dunning, of thb Arden Craig, said : "We were from Melbourne with wheat, and had a good passage home, 100 days to Queenstown, where we got orders for Calais. We left Queenstown last evening, had thick top; all the time, and did not eight anything until we struck. I was at dinner at one p.m., when I felt the ship strike. I thought we were quite twenty miles W.S.W. of Scilly. "I at once went on deck, and found the ship was fast filling with water. I ordered the boats to be got out. By the time this was done the ship had come off the rocks, and had nine feet ol water m her hold.. I gave orders to Jeave the ship, as there was no chance of saving her. We were three miles from the nearest land. The St. Acnes lifeboat arrived; and we lay off until the ship foundered about, three p.m going down m deep water. We lost all

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19110301.2.90

Bibliographic details

Poverty Bay Herald, Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 12393, 1 March 1911

Word Count
1,789

GREAT GALE. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 12393, 1 March 1911

Working