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THE KING'S DERBY.

. A SENSATIONAL RACE. SCENE ©F WILD .ENTHUSIASM. LONDON, "]\Jay 28. King Edward won his Derby, and there followed one iof the wildest scenes of enthusiasm ever known in England, it iVas ■-.•.sensational race, anybody's race., Minoru, although a brilliant colt, wasynot considered as great as many DerlJy.jLandidates of the past. All the preyiorfs /week he was closely pressed for favoritism by the American-owned/ Sir Martin, who carried tons of "-money from across the Atlantic. As the horses went to the post, Sir ;Martin was a point shorter in odds. Iho King's colt was as handsome* as a Royal colt should be. Sir Mai-tin ywals u plain, alhiost ugly, fellow, but a wonderful mover, as became the representative ,of thp Vigorous Republic^ Xhe'v race was regarded as an „ fn^ernaiional duel. Unhappily for America, 'and, probably, very luckily for the -' hobos '.ot /England, ; the American's candidate was ' crowded, and brought down. " ' -•/-' **' -■':■'•

Miruiru. drew the inside position, whioh \yas the beginning or hit* luck. Tho day was one of alternate sunshine and sharp showers* und heavy rain was falling as the field faced tht) barrier; but the vast crowds took their ducking cheerfully. Surely it was worth a soaking to see the uerby. won for the first -timo in its 100 years by a crowned monarch. Even those who had wagered against .the King's horse /were eaUght by the prc•vaihng excitement and desire, and; almost carried into the 'current of wishes for- the triumph of England's popular monarch. The King, ' accompanied by the Queen and the Prince and Princess of -Wales, occupied the- Royal box, and the party was plainly disturbed out of its wonted equanimity. There was a hum of congratulations when, through the* rain, the Koyal colors I worn by Jones, the King's jockey, were discerned next the -rails. Every little advantage was appreciated. Not the most ardent supporters of Minora helieved h© cbiild give an easy beating to Sir Martin, although he was believed to hold the rest in safety. And that the King's beautiful thoroughbred — every inch an aristocrat— should be beaten by the ugly duckling from the Republic was a thought suggestve of something in the nature of a national calamity. Louviers (nine to one) was first out of the barrier,' with Sir Martin fifth, and Minoru second last. But the order was at once changed, and after galloping a furlong, Louviers led from his stable mate # Brookslands, with Sir Martin third', and Minoru fourth. So they rau until Tatenham Corner; and the race was still as open as , possible. Then came the catastrophe to America. Sh Martin fell, and interfered bady with William the Fourth, and up went the chances of Royalty. The sun shone out on the field as they entered the straight, and a roar of mighty volume — "The King wins-!-'— proclaimed that Minoru was making his run. For a hundred yards he appeared to have Louviers at his mercy, and to be cutting him down at his ease,/ but . Louviers, although caught, was not' beaten. The two horses cahie up the straight as near to level as horses ever raced, and then for a few strides the outsider gained the ascendancy", and led by, a neck. The crowd watched/ ,tho> str-ugglp : jp, .dead ... silenceThe two colts were * well clear of thp field,, nnd the others appeared clean out of the; hunt. But then there flashed across the gap tho orange and sapphire borne by' the neglected William > the

Fourth, and. the three joined issue. A few. : lengths ' from the., winning post, Jones made - his . supreme . call on Minora. The colt answered- bravely, and -the crowd waited' in . extraordinary silence for. the decision of the judge. William the Fourth/:* although galloping faster than the others, was too late by half* a length, but between the- first two it was a matter of inches. Up went No. 1, Minoru's number, and Bedlam was loose. The police were there in legions, but one lost them in the tumult that followed. A wild rush, thousands strong^ swept all before it, as it moved to a position round, the Royal box. HiMajesty at once showed liis intention of being in the* thick of it, and in all that followed 'one was impressed with the fact that in England, atr'ieast the King is still at Home, And safe; when rubbing shoulders with, the people. For 1 it was a matter *of rubbing shoulders. The King, bareheaded, and all smiles^ came down from the box along the narrowest lane he had ever, traversed, with the Prince of Walesj laughing delightedly like a schoolboy, following. He negotiated the stairs, and went through outstretched hands, to the accompaniment of a storm of cheers, into the weighing enclosure, and then on to meet Minora and the triumphant Jones. The police fought stoutly to keep the passage clear, but at times lost all control, and the King would be swallowec up and lost among, the people.. More than one hand punched vigorously and familiarly on the shoulder, and he laughed." It wasn't every day he won a Derby, and not every day that the Eng lishman's love of a good horse, and a sporting owner broke down the barriei between King and coster.

.. Minorn -came back slowly through thi great mass 'that flooded the enclosure only .his head and the colors of liis,ridei visible. Richard Marsh got to work, or a crowd that could hot make way for the King let : alone f 6r the Royal trainer, and half fought,, half climbed, to the head of , the v'icisr. He slipped , a leading reih oil to y,tbe"b-idle|' appealed t< the .police aud tjie crowd, and deliverec to tne King the"contrbl of his winner There was' a fresh storm of cheers whei King Edward led his colt into the en closure. ; Then, after ■an ovation to tht Queen, the crowd melted away in quesi of; the next winner. : ..

■"Minoru was doubly lucky. His finisl shows' that he does not tower- above thc ordinary .liorses. of his year. Had Wil liam tbe 'Fodrth •fio'tlfeen 'interfered with it is hard to see ; hbw.Jie could have lost He y was badly obstrnctedy and when h« got clear ho ran over his field and wa: galloping much faster than the others a' the finish. As'to Sir Martin, ho om can say bu*^ that his recent form shower him vastly superior to manj of thos* who shaped well in the race. Still. Minora won, and the King won, anc the crowd forgot the luclc of it in thei? delight at the victory of a monarch whe shows that an Englishman can be botl diplomat and great '., sportsman.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19090703.2.71

Bibliographic details

THE KING'S DERBY., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXVI, Issue 11892, 3 July 1909

Word Count
1,108

THE KING'S DERBY. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXVI, Issue 11892, 3 July 1909

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