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BOER WAR EPISODE'. COMPLAINTS OF MISJUDGMENT. The English mail received yesterday brought the t«xt of the interview with the Kaiser whicli caused shell a s'eilsatioA on its publication in the Loiidon Daily Telegraph on October 28i. The main portion of the interview was piiblishied iii the Herald last weekj having, been cabled from Sydney. After declaring his friendship for the English — though they were "mad as March \ha)es/' because they did not trust him-r-the -Emperor went on to defend the sending of ,Dr Vassal, the. German Consul, to l?ez. The step had been taken, merely to protect the private interests of German subjects, and, to secui-e the early rewguiticm of "Mulai Hiifid. Despite journalistic mischiefmakers, "there has been, nothing in Germany's recent action with regard to Morocco which TUng contrary td the explicit declaration of -any love of peace," but his actions spoke louder than words. ,- , The Emperor cited two' striking instances. At the time of the South African war, when German opinion undoubtedly was hostile, "bitterly hostile, to England, he had refused to receive the Boer delegates, and "tho agitation immediately died down." • "When the struggle was at its height the German Government ■ was ■■ invited by tlie Governments of France and Russia to join with them in calling upon England to put an end to the war. The moment had come, they said, not only to save the Boer Republics, but also to humiliate England to the diist. What was my reply? I said that so far from Germany joining in any concerted European action to put pressure- upon England and bring about lier downfall Germany would keep aloof from ■ politics that'! could' bring her into complications with a sea Power like England. "Nor was that all. Just at the time of your Black Week in December,' 1899, when disasters followed one another in, rapid succession, I received a. letter from Queen' Victoria, my revered - grandmother, written in sorrow and affliction, and bearing, manifest ' traces of the anxiety which was preying upon her mind' and health. I at once returned a, sympathetic reply. Nay. I did more, and bade one of my officers procure for. me as exact an account as> he could obtain /.of \the number of combatants in South. Af rica ,on both sides, and of the actual position pf- the opposing forces. With figures before me I worked what I ,to be the best 1 p|lan _of campaign . untjer the circumstances, antf submitted it toj my general s^taii for their criticism. Then I despatched it .to .England, and ,tliat docu-,, ment, likewise is among the State papers at Windsor Castle, awaiting the serenely 1 impartiaJl verdict of history. And, "as a I matter of curious coincidence, let hie I " add next, the plan whicli I formulated ran very much on, the same Jines as that 'which wa« actually adopted by Lord i Roberts, and carried by him to a successful operation. Was t*h&t, I repeat^ the art of one who wished England 'ill? Let Englishmen be just and say. "Th» inei - eas& of the German 1 navy,'^ the Emperor added, "is .required by the, growth of the Empire and its commerce, but also by possible 'eventualities' in tMe Far East. Who ea.u foresee what may take place in the Pacific in the days to coine, days not so distant ae some bejieve^ but days at anyrate for which' all European Powers with Far, 'Eastern interests ought steadily to prepare? Look at tli/e accomplished rise of 1 Japan, think of the possible national awakening oi ' China, and them, judge of the , vast problems of the Pacific. It may even be* that Elngland lierseTf will be glad that Germany has a fleet when, they speak together on the same side in.' the greater debate of the future."

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THE KAISER'S INTERVIEW. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXV, Issue 11449, 3 December 1908

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