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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Poverty Bay Herald PUBLISHED EVERY EVENING. GISBORNE, FRIDAY, SEPT. 22, 1905.

Mrs Howie, the well-known New Zea land contralto, is expected to urriA'e al Wellhigton from Loudon next week.

The s.s. Ventura brought to Auckland a shipment of 500 tons of Californian pota. toes, Avhieh were landed at £9 per ton.

Two elderly men, both new arrivals here, Avere convicted at the Police Court this morning of drunkenness yesterday, and, being first offenders, were discharged Avith a caution. William Kennedy Avas fined ss, costs 9s 6d, m default 24 hours, for drunkenness at Makaraka, and for smashing, two ipanes of glass, valued at £2 ss, he was fined 10s, costs- 2s, and ordered to pay the amount of damage, m default seven days.

A meeting of the members of the Baptist Church was held last night at the residence of Oaptain Cummings, when some important business was discussed m connection Avith the proposed building of a Baptist. Church m Gisborne, and before long it is expected that the building will ;be erected ov a site that lias been chosen m Palmerston road. Any contributions to hei]) on the Baptist cause m Gisborne will be gratefully received by the secretary, Mr H. East, or the Rev. Mr .Parry.

Tlie resuscitation by the Druids of the one-time familiar basket social proved very successful last evening. There were nearly a hundred competitors, and there were a dozen baskets which were of exceptional merit. The first prize was awarded to Mrs G. Simeon for a

handsome basket, decorated with orange and pale blue paiper. 'The contents made a complete little dinner, and their value, including two bottles of champagne, Avas not far short of £2. The following was the menu printed on a neat card : Oysters on the shell, fowl, ham and ham sandwiches, fruit salad, jelly, dessert, champagne, cigars and cigarettes.

Charges of being found on licensed premises on a Sunday Avere preferred at the Magistrate's Court this morning against two men named John Colbert and James Lamont. Both pleaded guilty to being on the licensed premises oi the Albion hotel on Sunday, 17th inst.? His Worslrip pointed out that defendants had not only broken the hiAV themselves, but had tried to get the licensee to do so. The provisions of the Licensing Act Avere \ r ery well known now, and he had not the slightest doubt that defendants knew they were breaking the statute. A fine of £2, costs 7s, was inflicted on each defendant.

A meeting Avas held m Te Karaka Schoolroom on Wednesday night for the purpose of forming a tennis club. There avus a very large attendance of ladies and gentlemen. Sir J. McCredie presided. After a good deal of discussion it Avas decided to form a club, and the following officers were elected for the year : President, Mr Northe ; vice-presideuts, Messrs Armstrong and Marshall ; lion, secretary, Mr R. CardeT; hion. treasurer, Miss Greeu ; Committee, Mesdames Lewi? and Armstrong, Misses Sefton, Evinson and Green, Messrs Northe, McCredie and Carder. It avos decided to liold a social at an early date with the view of raising sufficient funds to purchase a section for a court.

To-day his Worship the Mayor and tho Town Clerk were at their wits' end to provide for the reception of a diphtheria patient from Ormond. The sufferer, a child of 12 months, required medical attention every tAvo hours or so, and as it Avas impossible to get this at Ormond it Iwd to be brought into toAvn. As m other cases of contagious diseases the utmost difficulty has been experienced m obtaining quarters for the patient, and this case should revive again m an accentuated form the agitation for the erection of a small infectious diseases hospital for tbe treatment of scarlatina, diphtheria, etc. The local bodies interested nave put off facing the matter from time to time, although acknowledging its necessity, and perhaps it will require an epidemic before they Avill be able to screw their courage to sticking poiut. This afternoon was a busy time for the Mayor and ToAvn. Clerk searcbin.tr for a home for the treatment of the diphtheria case. The Hospital,, as usual, was closed to them, tlvj custodiau of the Old -Men's Home declined to have anything to do Avith it, while the owner of a private house, at present empty, refused absolutely to rent hia place for tho purposes of. a- tempo"rary hospital, and up to 3 o'clock no success had attended the Borough authorities' efforts.

Tenders close on Monday for hospital supplies.

The box plans for the "Hugardes" season will be opened at Mr Miller's tomorrow morning at nine sharp.

Messrs Miller and Craig advertise for to-morrow an auction of a large consignment of travellers' samples.

At Launeeston last week John Stack, 31 years, an A.B. on the steamer Wakatipu, fell from aloft, a distance of 32ft, and Avas killed instantly.

Messrs Bain Bros, report having held a veiy successful sale of furniture on Wednesday last. Tho firm advertise for tomorrow sales of maize, drapery, electroplate and jewellery.

Regulations for the protection of kauri trees from destruction by "bleeding" and other methods are published m last week's Gazette. Any person convicted of "bleeding" shall be liable to a fine of £25 for each offence, m addition to payment of damages. Payment of the fine Avill not prevent prosecution for theft of gum. Other timber trees are protected from unlawful injury by the provision of a. fine not exceeding £5.

A phrase of a judgment delivered by Mr Justice Chapman m the Arbitration Court the other day — "Every lawyer must acknowledge that tine law is not logical at all" — may afford a certain satisfaction and some sorry .solace to harassed aud desponding litigants (says the Otago Daily Times). It also opens \ip a -wide field of conjecture. If the law is illogical, m how far can it be said to embody or provide the reality of justice? If illogical law :s not {as may be contended by the critical) always perfectly administered, does such, imperfect administration intensify or modify the natural Aveakness of the flaws m logic inherent m the statutes? Hero is room for grave and serious con•sideration.

The Natal Mercury states that the commission of British engineers appointed to report on the various plans for outer works at Algoa Bay recommends either of the following: (a) A solid breakwater on the sea fact» 6850 ft m length, an inner quay 400 ft by 300 ft, the widening of the inner portion of the Dom Pedro jetty, and the extension of the north pier to 7650 ft. to be constructed at a cost of £1,100,000; (b) a south breakwater 7000 ft m length, connected Avitli. the shore by a viaduct approach of 1000 ft, and having reclamation at its inner i-nd ; the extension of the north pier to 7500 ft m length, and of a new jetty of the mean length of 2100 ft and a width of 500 ft; this is estimated to cost £3,220,000.

M* Widdowson, S.M., at Dunedin, last week passed the salutary sentence ol six montlis' imprisonment, Avith hard labor, on Patrick Keogh, who, a few years ago, Avas admitted to be the befit half-back that New Zealand football had ever known. Recently much of Keogh's time has been spent m gaol. His wife was out washing at Roslyn last Tuesday, m order to earn a living for her children and herself, when the accused appeared on the scene, and, catching her by the hair, dragged her about the room and yard. The accused admitted m Court having, on one occasion, given his Avife her fare to Ocean Beach and told: her to go and drown herself. • After tentence had been passed, Keogh expressed a hope that the Magistrate would be found dead m his bed next day.

The Union Cricket Club held their annual meeting, last evening at the Hotel Coronation, Mr J. Lang hi the chair. There was an attendance of 20 members. The annual report was of a satisfactory nature, and stated that there was a balance of over £1 m hand, Avith £2 to be cellected. The thanks of the Club were due to those vice-presidents who so generously donated to the funds of the Club. Mr E. Murphy was elected president, and a number of other gentlemeiu elected to the oflice of vice-presidents. Mr J. Lang was elected captain, Mr Geo. Priestly vice-captain, Mr G. Tattersall secretary and treasurer, and Messrs J. Ferris, P. Sheridan, J. Lung and Tattersall a Selection Committee. Messrs J. Lang and V. Sheridan were appointed delegates to the Association 1 . The subscription for the year was fixed at ss, and it Avas decided to open the season on Thursday, October sth, with a match captain's v. vice-cap-tain's teams, afternoon tea to be provided. Mr Johnston's bat for the highest score avus stated to luive been Avon by Mr Lang. Tlie membership of the Club Avas estimated at 37. A 'vote of thanks was accorded Mr Francis for supplying supper.

Miss Ewarl, matron of the Christchurch hospital, has returned to Christchurch from a six months' trip to Kingland. She made a point of visiting several of the great hospitals, and what impressed her as much as anything was tlie splendid management m the kitchens m all of the hospitals, especially m Edinburgh. Ingenuity seems to haA'e exhausted itself m finding means of facilitating tho enormous amount of work that has 'to be done m connection ■with the catering for patients and the staff, and m devising methods of saving labor. At Edinburgh the whole operation seems to be done by the moving of levers, which a child could attend to. One of the features of the New Royal Victoria Institution is the system of ventilation. Great fans, kept m motion by engines, have been erected at both ends of the building, and they drive the air through bamboo curtains,* from which Avater is continually dripping. The air is forced into the institution and through the wards. There are complete appliances for regulating the temperature m each AA'ard, so that it can be changed at any time of the night or day, without any doors or windows being opened.

A correspondent telegraphed from Wellington this afternoon : "A party from Government House attended the entertainment given by the 'Hugardes' last evening. The performance was a briL liant success. His Excellency the Governor avus particularly anxious to witness the. feat entitled 'Invulnerability,' and for that purpose brought witb him a marked bullet. His Excellency expressed himself as greatly pleased Avith the performance." Speaking of this feat, the Wellington Evening Post says : "Perhaps the most startling, of the conjuring feats was that entitled 'Invulnerability,' m Avhicli Dal Hugarde is the active and Iris brother the passive performer. From a tray of bullets, the audience are requested to pick three, and mark them. Three volunteers then march from the back of the auditorium to the stage, Avhere their rifles are loaded, m view of the spectators, with tlie marked bullets. 'They then return to the rear of the pit, and Jean Hugarde, who has been sitting watching the proceedings, now arises and holds before his breast a square of black velvet with a red heart embroidered on it, as a. target for the marksmen. There is a loud report, and the three marked bullets drop from the velvet shield into a plate beneath, which is immediately carried into the stalls, where the bullets are examined and verified br the puzzled spectators. Another loud round of applause greeted the successful performance of tliis feat."

The bridge erected over the Wanganui river, near Taumarunui, by Messrs Ellis and Robinson, the enterprising linn of saAvmillers, is an imposing structure. It is constructed close to their private railway siding "at Hanunui, on the Main Trunk railway. Its length is nearly 400 feet, and its height from low water to under structure of bridge is 21 feet, Avhieh is well over flood level at that point, where the river is much wider than some miles lower down. Two of the spans are 110 feet long, and the superstructure is of truss construction, about 16 feet high. Owing to tho enormous boulders that had to be driven through, special lvardwood piles had to be imported and shod with special cast -steel shoes weighing nearly 1001 b, Avhieh proved so effective that all the piles were got down to proper depth without mishap, although a two-ton monkey was used, with a 10ft drop, and the piles were drivtti virtually to a standstill. Over £50Q Avorth; of ironwork has been used m the bridge. Most of the timber used was cut by the firm at a makeshift mill on the site. The erection of the bridge from start to finish took 15 weeks, which, considering the very hard driving encountered, is a smart bit of work. The bridge has been put up to give access to the firm's large forests on the Pungapunga river. These are claimeel to be the finest totara.. matai and white pine bushes m the island, but carry very little rimu. The last-named timber very seldom crows to any extent Avith or near totara. The firm liave the great bulk of the machinery for a large mill noAv on the site, and have commenced the erection of one of the largest and most modern sawmills m the colony.

A woman named Florence Barnes, who has twice been convicted of drunkenness, Avas brought before Mr Barton, S.M., this morning on a charge of being an idle and disorderly person, having insufficient lawful means of support. Evidence Avas given by tho police that she was arrested yesterday afternoon m Customhouse street, and that for some Aveeks she had been knocking around town m a semi-intoxi-cated condition, sleeping out at night, aud her conduct generally had been disgraceful. A resident near the school gave evidence that on Tuesday night his household were disturbed by a woman screaming and men talkiug m the school grounds. At 5 next morning be went to the school and found defendant jn one of the shelter sheds m company with a man. When asked what sue Avas doing there defendant said she Avas looking for something she had lost. — Defendant, who pleaded not guilty, said §he had only left a situation hi the country last Thursday Aveek, Avhen she had over £5 of her own. < She had anotlier situation to go io on Whataupoko It Avas drink that brought her to her preJ sent position, and she was willing that a prohibition order should be issued against her. — Tlie Magistrate remanded defendant till 2 o'clock, m order that further inquiries could be made. On tbe Court resuming, his Worship, after hearing the result of the inquiries, said he would not send defendant to gaol, Avhieh Avas not a proper place for her. He Avould give her au opporlunitv to load a better Me. and iv dischargini? defendant cautioned her not to do anything Avbich would lead to her being brought before him on a similar charge.

Apart- altogether from the undue proportion of railways m the South Island when the present Government took office (teays the Auckland Herald), it has added four miles of railway to thej South for every three miles it has added to th© North. And though the North lias now the greater population, j contributes most to the public revenues, I and has incomparably the better pros- j pects and the more pressing necessities, • the same grosb injustice continues year after year with nothing but a feeble verbal protest from those of our Auck- 1 laud members who. sit behind the Government. And not only are four miles of railway being built m. the South to every three m the North, but they are being built m the South under enormous difficulties and at a crushing cost. The Government cannot afford to ■\viden the Parnell tunnel or otherwise duplicate the Auckland-Newmarket section, but ifcj can afford to bore sLs-mile tunnels m tlve desolate heart of the Southern Alps, I m order to gratify th© West Coast. And it finds some Aucklanders so simple that they profess to be satisfied with the meaningless sums that are allocated to Northern ■ railways before the election, although every intelligent man and wo- , man know that these fanciful sums are not intended to be- spent.

> There arc four Liberal candidates m the field for Wanganui.

Mr Byron Brown, who is wooing, the electors of Otaki, poses as a "No-license ; No-Seddon" candidate. The exports from Argentine ports for the six months ending June 30 last consisted of : 750,000 tons of maize, 440,000 tons of linseed, 1,870,000 tons of wheat, 19,000 tons of hay and 104,000 tons of AVOoI .

The French mail steamer Pacifiquc, from Noumea to Sydney, ran short of coal a few days ago, and had to put into Brisbane. When Cape Moreton hove m sight the creAv were about to start burning the Avoodwork of the ship.

lavo potato-spraying machines ordered by the Department of Agriculture m readiness for possible reappearance of the potato disease have arrived m Wellington, and are being fitted up. Each machine is capable of spraying 35 acres a day.

A letter was received last week by Mr W. A. Quin', of Hawera Tsays the Wanganui Chronicle), from Mr George Fletcher, of Killay, Pomeroy -who is 117 years of age. On his last- birthday Mr Fletcher received a gold snuff-box from his Majesty the King.

"I don't think," said the Chairman of the Education Conference to the Premier, " that a single Education Board m this colony received a clean Balance sheet from the Auditor-General m connection with their accounts last year." "I don't get one myself," rejoined Mr Seddon, "so that is nothing new.

The Ngaire Co-operative Dairy Company declined an offer of sid per lb for their season's output of cheese. The offer equalled a pay-out of lld for but-ter-fat. The company preferred to consign on an advance of 4_d per lb, anticipating that the cheese will realise fully s_ci per lb.

Realising the importance of having a steady supply of pure, fresh, lymph., the New Zealand Government established a special laboratory m Wellington a short time ago for the purpose of preparing it for distribution to medical men. and Hospitals throughout the colony. Dr. McGill was placed m charge of the laboratory, and the first supply of lymph Avas distributed about six weeks ago.

Mr Lionel Terry, who, though still a young man (says the New Zealand Times), has travelled much m Europe, America, Africa, and other parts of the world, arrived m Wellington on 'Thursday, having travelled on foot from Mongonui, m the far north of the Auckland district. Mr Terry calculates that m his 40 days' actual walking from Mongonui to Wellington he has covered 878 miles, at the average rate of between 20 and 21 miles a day.

The plan adopted by the New South Wales GoA'ernment of sending unemployed into the country to engage m .fossicking and rabbiting has proved a dismal failure. Up to August 31 the men sent to the country numbered 235, and the net cost Avas £496. Only a few men are still working under the agreement with the Government. The Premier says he is more than ever satisfied that the more men are made self-reliant tlie less the State Avill be troubled with an unemployed problem.

Mr W. T. C. Greene, of Parkside, Braintree, Essex, m a letter to the Standard, says that at ten minutes to 3 p.m. ou July 21 part of a load of hay was taken up by a whirdlwind some 5000 ft high. "Some of it we watched out of sight, and ne\'er saw it again. It had the appearance of a flock of rooks going round and round as they ascended almost straight up. There was scarcely a breath of air at the time elsewhere."

The Chief Justice made some strong continents at Sydney on the N.S.W. land laws. They were m a disgraceful state, he said, and luid been so for 40 years. "I suppose there are not half-a-dozen men m the State avlio thoroughly understand the Acts relating to the lands of New South Wales," said Sir Frederick Darley, "and therefore how the unfortunate man Avho desires to settle on the land can go on it with any degree of safety I am at a loss to know."

What is probably the largest flock of black sheep m Australia, says a Melbourne correspondent, has just been disposed of by Messrs Whinfield, of Bamawm, to Hay Bros., of Tcrang. It consisted of 2600 black merino ewes, -which are now approaching Echuca, after a three months' journey from landra station, during -which not one animal was lost. It will take the flock tliree montlis more to reach its destination m the western district.

At the North Melbourne Court last Ayeck, during the hearing of a prosecution against two sisters for arrears clue under an order requiring them to pay so much a Aveek towards an old age pension to their mother, Dr Lloyd, the presiding magistrate, severely commented on the negligence of offspring to assist their parents. Dr Lloyd sard he had been informed that there was a member of the Senate receiving £400 a year whose father or mother was drawing an old age pension. Such a thing was a scandal and a national disgrace. '

During the hearing of a maintenance case m Dunedin, a laborer employed on the Otago Central rhilway stated he had averaged 7s 8d a day for five days a week during the past four months. This he considered a high average, and stated the co-operative gang system avos so arranged throughout the colony on various Government works that when a gang averaged 7s a day per man, or became too good, it was split up. The average earnings on co-operative Avorks he esti-

mated at 4s to 7s a day per man. The cost of living Avas nearly £1 a week, and coal cost 5s a bag. winch the Avorkers had to buy from the Government out of their earnings. The men had to pay for powder, tools, horses' feed, etc.

The Otago Daily Times thus reproves one of Dunedin' g local bodies: — "Theproceedings of the Roslyn Borough Council, thanks to the undignified manner aud speech of a minority of the councillors, resemble a sort of junior Donnybrook. There is no bloodshed, and no fear of any. The minority is simply rude and shabby m its behavior,, Avithout being m the slightest degree forcible or luminous. One member the other night called another a flathead, and on another occasion two others blustered across the table as to which of them Avas the better gentleman. Such beliavior m grown men discussing serious questions is rather pitifully silly, and the Council, instead of deputing members of its body to interview and instruct newspapers, might with advantage labor to acquire a little dignity and consistency, and so make its deliberations more intelligible and better worth reporting.

Liquor and license were burning questions m Wellington even m 1858, remarks the Post. Tavo petitions appear m the proceedings of the sixth session of tlie Provincial Council, held m that year. In those days, it appears, anyone could sell up to two gallons of alcoholic liquors without a license ; and 23 licensed victuallers petitioned m protest. Tbe other . petition came from 96 people of different views. Avith the names of James Buller (Wdsleyun Minister) and Joshua Smith (Primitve Methodist minister) m the forefront. They called attention to "the alarming amount of intemperance prevalent m this town," and asked that no more licenses be granted, "and for the more effectually closing public houses on the Sabbath." The petitioners assert "that there is m tliis town alone, which, according to the census taken a feAV months ago, contains 2012 -persons above the age of 15 years, 22 houses for the sale of intoxicating liquor, and three more m the immediate neighborhood."

From inquiries made by an Otago Daily Times reporter, it Avould appear that a considerable number of unskilled laborers are out of employment, and to many of them the prospect of obtaining immediate employment is not A*ery encouraging. The number of unemployed hns been estimated at about 300, and tbe Mayor, Mr Braitfowaite, states that considerable numbers of men out of Avork have applied to hint during his term of office, many applicants coming repeatedly to inquire for employment. He would say 300 Avas a fair estimate. Mr Skene, labor agent, stated he had 72 applicants for unskilled labor m three days during the past week, and instanced a case Avhere 35 men bad applied m answer to an advertisement, the Avork offered being a day's digging for one man. On the other hand he experienced the utmost difficulty m getting suitable farm laborers. "In fact, ' said Mr Skene, "avo cannot get skilled ploughmen or milkers. The latter is the experience of two other labor agents. I could find situations for 200 domestics every month," said one agent, and the Avages offered are higher than I have ever know them to be. I think myself lucky if I can get one suitable domestic for every 10 inquiries."

Guard T. Fowke, m his lengthened service on the railways, estimates tlxat he Ikts travelled 1,716,000 miles over the lines of the South Island.

At the Central Police Court, Sydney, a youth named Aubrey Priest was fined £3, or one months imprisonment, for "sticking-up" another boy at Pyrmont with a catapult, and rifling his pockets.

Tlie friends of J. J. Meikle, styled the "New Zealand Dreyfus," having organised by appointing a committee of eight, are very determined to keep the movement going for getting his name off the prison records, and obtaining him ade. quate compensation for his sufferings.

The septic tank m connection with the New Plymouth Borough drainage scheme has been put into use, aiid from tests made by tlie Borough Engineer is doing very satisfactory work. The flow from the tank, after the sewage has passed through the filtering process, is quite clean and is not accompanied with even the suspicion of a smell. Some of the fluid bottled for a couple of days looks like perfectly pure water, and is quite free from any offensive rising.

An incident of an amusing nature, not altogether without its moral, occurred diiring the progress of a Band of Hope entertainment given at Belfast on Thursday evening, says the Lyttelton Times One of the lady performers, an etithusist on temperance matters, fainted. A call was immediately made for a volunteer to proceed to the nearest hotel (about a mile away) for brandy, which was quickly procured, and under its influence the patient made a speedy recovery.

As an evidence of the effect of a mild winter, it will be interesting to note (says the Mataura Ensign) that sheep bought m Southland by northern freezing companies have boen found to be very much above the average of previous years m quality. A buyer wlio purchased a line of several thousand tAvotooth sheep, which Avere frozen at the Dunedin works, states that they averaged 641 b. The amount of internal fat Avas fully 31b more than uisua' Tlie sheep all round ar* much m advance of previous years m Southland.

Mr George Cooper Franklin, President of the British Medical Association, gave a very interesting address at the recent meeting of that body. Concerning the prevalent faith m alleged "specialists," he said:— "The public did not believe m uniyersalism m medicine, but pinned their faith to some specialist who had taken up some particular ailment or organ. An old fellow student of his now holding a high position as a consulting physician m London told him that a 'ady of distinction had brought her child for him to see because she had been given to understand he avus a specialist for children between the ages of seven and eight, and her child was just seven and a-half.

"Maori children are exceedingly apt at teAving, and the Avork of the schools as a Avhole should give every satisfaction," says the Inspector of Native Schools. "Indeed, there are some schools Avhere the stitches have the regularity of machine work. At present, hoAvever, most of our teachers confine their energies to the production of sampler work, acid the children get little practical training. In some schools girls are trained to make a garment— e.g., a night-dress— and I haA-e seen a shirt made by a boy m good style. I think that this practical work is Avhat we ought to encourage, and tliat, if necessary, the various forms of stitches, etc., be reduced to a minimum m order to give the time for practical Avork. In one or tAvo schools children are taught to cut out m paper, and this, too, is a practice that I hope to pee extended m time."

Shipowners engaged m the Ncav Zea-land-Australian timber trade are liaving an extremely Ha-clv time looking up second mates for their barquentines, say? the Australian Star of the 7th inst. They can't get the right tsort of men foi the positions, but, nevertheless, recent New Zealand legislation compels them to carry one. The shipoAvners have reluctantly been compelled •to sack their old boatswains to make way for tlie second mates. The boatsAvains Avere, it seems, good teamen and hard-Avorking hands, and were very useful indeed, still the extra expense precluded their being retained m the vessels. Tlie barque Ganymede is the latest A„.<-el to get stuck up aAvaiting a second mate. She is at Kaipara, loading timber for Adelaide, and after a hard search a recond mate was secured m Sydney, and is to be -despatched by the* steamer Star of NeAv Zealand to join the vessel at Kaipara. The man had to be secured from a big ship m port. There is such a dearth of second mates now that a captain had to be decured for the position m one barquentinc, which Avas unable to leave New Zealand until the got a second mate.

About a mile south of the Mount Bruce bridge, on one of the low hills, close to the road, there is an extensive outcrop oi quartz, which, for some time past, has been an object of speculative interest Iwrites the Mount "Mruce correspondent of the Wairarapa Daily Times). The section on which the quartz reef m question is located is the property of Mr Field, but it is stated that quartz of a similar character crops up on the land of Mr A. M'Leod, about two miles away, so that the reef is an extensive one. Some time ago, -surface stone from MiField's land -was sent up to the Auckland School of Mines, and it is rumored that the results of the assay tliere made Avere seven shillings worth of gold and three shillings Avorth of silver to the ton ol quartz. The assay avus understood to be accompanied with a recommendation to sink for deeper and richer stone. It is noAv an open secret that a syndicate of prominent settlers has been formed' to work the reef, and it is also understood that a sum of six thousand pounds is available for investment. Plant has been ordered, Avhieh is expected to be on the ground m December next. Experienced miners, who haA'e examined the reef, speak favorably of its prospects. The promoters of the operations, which will shortly be commenced, are reticent over their prospective plans; but the topic is one that is creating confdderable interest m the neighborhood, and the facts stated above, if not derived from authoritative sources, are generally accepted as correct by the settlers of the Mount Bruce district. The importance of this new enterprise to this district cannot be over-estimated if it results m the opening up of. a payable goldfield.

I A San Francisco Police MagiMrate has told a butcher who AVas brought before [ him that he must choose once for all Avhat trade he will follow— that of v butcher or that of a landscape artist.; but that lie must, not mix the two. The humorous rebuke avus occasioned (writes the correspondent of the Age under date August 10th) by the discovery that he had painted his meat with dyes m order to make it look as if just cut. A raid on the butchers was thai ordered by the Board of Health, and of 147 samples of meat seized 122 Avere found to have been treated Avith some sort of preservative or dye. In many places cans were marker "preseiwaline' and "freezen" were discoA-ered, also liquids containing coal tar dyes. Sixteen of the samples had been treated with coal tar dye, 18 with starch and sodium salts, 117 with sodium sulphite, 6 Avith nitrates, and only 25 Avere pure meat products. The names of all the offending butchers were sent to the police authorities, Avith instructions to prosecute if the condition*; did not change. In San Francisco many sanitary measures are taken that are not thought of elsewhere. For instance, the Board of Education has recently prohibited the ruse of slates and pencils m the city schools. "Tlie use of dates and pencils m the public schools," states the Board, "is recognised by the medical profession as injurious to the personal hygiene of the individual pupil, especially Avhen eaid slates and pencils come m contact -with the lips, tongue, and oral cavity of the pupils; and an interchange of slates and pencils among the different pupils is constantly taking place, by reason of Avhicli the germs of communicable diseases are frequently transferred from pupil to pupil." Lead pencils and paper will m future be need instead of slate's and pencils.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19050922.2.10

Bibliographic details

Poverty Bay Herald PUBLISHED EVERV EVENING. GISBORNE, FRIDAY, SEPT. 22,1905., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXIII, Issue 10469, 22 September 1905

Word Count
5,636

Poverty Bay Herald PUBLISHED EVERV EVENING. GISBORNE, FRIDAY, SEPT. 22,1905. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXIII, Issue 10469, 22 September 1905

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