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Sermons for Little Children.

[By "Snyder."]

" Don't tell lies. You havo not just come from the office You have been drinking at the Masonic. The AnoeY WIFE : Act the lastScene the last. My Dear Children, — As all religious teaching is abolished from your Schools, and as clergymen have not yet learned to preach except to those who have money to put m the plate, I propose taking a duby on myself. Once every week, I shall deliver to you ashortsermon, and I hope that you will get all the benefit that can be derived from it, although I feel there are great difficulties m my path, which, at present, I hardly see my way clear to overcome.. For instance, children are oftentimes much given to telling lies. You' all know what a lie is. It is saying things which you know are not true. Saying you have not done something which you have done, or have,, not said something you know you have said. The greatest living lies are those on the dead, which you will read on tombstones ; but there are so many kinds of lies, which may be told, that they would outnumber the sands of the sad sea shore. Parents don't like children to tell lies ; so that if one of your mothers, — who would not have it known on any account that she does her own washing m the back kitchen — I say if your mother, under such circumstances, sees a visitor coming towards the house, and she tells you to .say that she is not at home, but has gene out to visit a friend, you must understand that this is not a lie. Because, if after you have been told what to say, whenVou answer the door, you said your mamma was up to her arms m soapsuds,Nyou would possibly be made to feel so apt somewhere or other,— l won't say wheT ce — that you would give a preference to sitting m a pail of water than anywhere elj*e you could think of. Perhaps, when a^ady does call, and it is at an hour yottT mamma is m a condition to see hei^^^feaving just put her dress m order, you n\ay hear your mamma say how delighted she is to see her, and then enquire so affectionately after the visitor s sweet little (lears °f children. When the lady leaveS* it is quite likely you will hear you njama say how she detests that womar~"wth her nasty aSected ways, and h^gier ugly, iil-bred brats are the worst-berHH m all Gisborne. I say, you musl^^fl think, when you come to bear m n^^B what your mamma said about b^H delighted to jee the lady, when she not at all delighted ; but quite contrary/ you must not think fJH moment that your mamma was telliMH lie. Tour mamma was merely aJHB the polite, and politeness requiresHß one should say things that ate verflH| from coming from the heart. But^Hß dears, they are not lies, although iflflE confess they look so like them at tHH that it is hard to discover the differfl^H If you should happen to hear your S^^H m the presence of a gentleman, sa}^^H she J will be eighteen next birtlHß when you have heard your, mother that she has just turned twenty -six^^H must not .think she is telling a lie. lias-only made a mistake, which is natural, because you know quite^^H that it. is only very clever people remember the circumstance of being fl^| Papas, too, are very angry when children tell a lie. It is such a WBM wicked thing to do. So when your^^B says through the newspapers that selling his goods below cost price, then comes home of an evening^^H tells your mamma that his profits will quite cover his W^^H expenses, you must understand th^^H has not been telling lies to his custo^^H It is only a trade notion. One th^^^f will teach you when you are old ei^^H to take part m his business. A ±^^H is not a lie. Tour mamma will te^^^B servant that she must be very part^^H m her cooking, because both he^Hß her master have been accustom^^H high living all their lives. Youi^^^l may only have been a messen^^^B some store, .at a pound a week, time he courted your mamma, wh^^^B was a kitchen maid at £30 a year^HH both had to dine upon what w^^flfl from the upstairs meal. But happen to know this, you must no^^^H your mamma has been telling HH^B She was merely wishing it to be^^^H stood what a very superior ma^^^H papa is, and how she herfl^H always beeA accustomed to good If these things I have been tellin^^H^H found out then they would be coi^^Hß as lies, I have no doubt, but wl^^^H found out they are only invfl^^Hj Now if the lady visitor who ca^^^H your mamma, when she was was^^^^B the kitchen, had caught sight through a chink m the door or the window she would go back ?^^^H she, that is your mamma, had B^^^^fl a lie to the door. So when peoj^^^^B cover that your papa sells his gf^H^^B lower than other people — per^^^^B little higher, they will see he tel^^^H and the gentlemen will say the s^^^^fl your sister — although of course her face, which would be very when he finds out the year she w^^^^H m ; and so will the servant when^^BH courted by a man who was a S^^^HB where her master served with y°^^|fl| when he was a messenger. To^^^^B understand that a lie is not a lie^H is found out. An egg may co^^^H[ chicken, but until the shell bren^^Bfl[ the chicken comes out it is only ; |^^^B So my dear children, if you hav^^HH to a cupboard which has accid^^HH been left open, and have got at pot be sure to wipe your moutl^^^H[ Because if your mamma charg^^^BH and you say you have not been^H^H jam-pot, just as you said youi* ]^HBH had. gone to see a friend at th^^B^fl time she was at the wash-tub. I^^^^B you have not wiped your moutl^HHH the fringe of jam left on your will be found out and then you w^^^H| into great tribulation. This found out is a very bad thing Inc^^^^B| I know that clergymen will that a lie under any circumstaifl^HH not to be excused, or looked over^^^H I suppose they ought to know. now an old man and a hoar f rc HHH settled on my beard and time haJ^HH gled snow with the hairs of m y^^H| But my memory carries me back very young days when my tender, gentle mother, after sh^H^H placed me m my sofa-bed, was W^B^H tell me that if • I went quietly toj^^^H the good fairies would leave som^^^H nice at my bed side when I awc^^HH the morning ; and when I did |P^fl there was always something whicß^^H

fairies had left me. A ripe apple, or some jam on bread, or a small paper of sweeties, I thought then it was the 5 fairies ; but now m my old days and long years I know my mother had told a . No, I cannot use the word to one so tender and so fond. Still it was not true. No fairy had left anything on the little table at the head- of my bed. I know now who wcls the fairy and no other fairy could have been so good. It is very wicked to tell lies I know. But I sometimes think that nurse was not altogether hardened iri sin who attended my little sick sister when she was dying with a slow, consuming fever. I recollect as if it was only yesterday when she looked with her large, melancholy hazel eyes and asked nurse whether she was going to die ; and the dear old nurse, kissing my sister's lips, said she was not going to die ; only God wanted more angels with Him m Heaven, and he was going to call her there with some other little children as good and as dear as herself. The old nurse, as she spoke these, words, trembled much over my little sister, then fast passing away ; but I do not think that the little lie she invented ever troubled her conscience, or caused her one terror when she thought of meeting with her Maker. I know that when I was a child— l don't know how it come to pass, nor who told me, — but I know "that I fully believed there was a man m the moon ; that the moon was made of green cheese ; that all cats were she's, and all dogs were he's, and that once upon a time, there was a boy named Jack who went up a bean-stalk which led to a giant's den, and that Jack cut off the giant's head, and run away with a goose which laid golden eggs. I don't believe all this now. I know it was all lies that must have been told me, but I think if no woise lies were {told no great harm would come of them. The moral of my sermon is this : That parents must not tell lies themselves if they "wish their children to speak the truth. I think I know men who have never committed murder, perpetrated a burglary, or) pickt a pocket ; but I don't know a man living that would look me in>the face and say he never told a lie. If he did, I should set him down as a liar at once. Only one man never told a lie ; that was Washington ; but as it was said he ycovldnH lie, why then it was not his MM^MMMj^fchan it. is t.htt fault of a

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH18790512.2.9

Bibliographic details

Sermons for Little Children., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume VI, Issue 693, 12 May 1879

Word Count
1,630

Sermons for Little Children. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume VI, Issue 693, 12 May 1879

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