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PERSONAL NOTES.

— The Duke of Sutherland, -whose son and heir, ( he Marquess of Stafford, came of age recently, ha? presented a petition to the Scottish Courts for leave to disen tail his estates in the counties of Sutherland, Ross, and Croinarty. — Twenty ye-irs ago Mr Thorne, M.P., was a labourer in. the West Harr Gas Works. Hit organising ability ha-s secured for thousands of his fellows shorter hours and better wages, and he has behind him an idolising army of unskilled toilers. At saven years of are. by the way, he was At work ir. the brickfields. In 1390 he becanie a councillor for West Ham. and eight years later was appointed mayor of tho borough, later becoming its member by a record majority. — Sir W'lliam Richmond, R.A., started at the- bottom rung of the ladder, and relates how he executed his first drawing for a good square meal. On this occasion he and a friend had »-un away fiom home, and as -their total capital amounted to 5s 6d, they soon found it difficult to keep body and soul together. After two days a friendly policeman came across them and persuaded them to return home. Sir William is deemed by experts the n->o-«t accomplished master of mosaics in England. — Tho- Rev. Prince Max of Saxony, that distinguished ecclesiastic, has known man" changes sim:e ho threw up his royal prerogatives to take oricst'a orders in the Catholic Church, and his last promotion as rector of the Austrian College in Romewill doubtless be received with much plca-sir.-e in Anglo-Italian circle*. One of the prince-priest's first; "cures" in London was in the shuns of the East End, where as an energetic mission priest he won golden opinions by his zeal and enthusiasm. He was a prorniDP-nt figure at the great E-ucha-ristic Congress, last year, and was among those who read oapers during the conferences.

—It is so very rarely that the religious and artistic vocations are united that the work of Father Ephiem Hickey, 0.F.M., now on riew at tho London Salon at tne Royal Albert Hail, is exciting much spor.al intsii.-e=;t. The painter has really succeeded in reproducing wine admirable a.nd I.feliko studies o^ Archbi«^op Bourne and Bishop Fenton. and sends as well a characteristic portrait of himself, showing the painter in his monastic garb, palette in hand. Father H.ickey 13 oh\iously a gifted artist, and by thus developing h : s ta'lont, mcke^ a link with tho tirros when the t,reat relisriou* ordars produced >>auiters cf the firet rank.

— Th& famous Lord Byron was the founder of tho Eton and Harrow match, and it is a coincidence that tho two-pair rooms in which he wrote '"Childe Harold," and "woke up to Hnd himself famous," are to let. The Harrow tiariit-or of Lord B\ ron is that he was a mocdy. gloomy, unpopular boy, who was so bullied by his companions that he u c 'd to hick> awaj from them in the churchyard. Yet, sa\s Society, he it. was who. in IQOS, arranged the fir-^t cricket match at Lord's between Eton and Harrow teams. Therefore, he wai a cricketer, and must have had frionds at both schools Lord Byron not only batted in the match, but he bowled as well. Accordinjr to the Harrow Register, he bowled on 3 wicket, and from that it would feem that his deformity of a club-foot could not have boen much of a hindrance to him in run,nin/2f, at any rate in early youth.

— Tho history of the Sassoo-ns L- onp- of the mest dramatic in the vc-ry drana-atic story of the Hebrew race. The original Sassoon was a Bombay merchant, but the family is ds*c<en.'.l*id from a group known as Ibn Shoshan. who at one time- hold the position of Kbs«i of Toledo. ,The name Shoshan, which signifies '"hly" in Hebrew, was {jraduallv transform'- 1 into Sa-a«oon, sisrnifMng '■gladness." The famiK claim Da\'<li~ cl«^crnt, and Abraham 8u c-~con,c -~con, who flourished in the s<?>cnteen<th century, stated that ho was a direct descendant of Slvphatiah, the fifth son of David. Not only are theiv many referencps to the name in Hebrew meJ upval literatui I*.1 *. but mention of it * made in the Talmud.

— The appointment of the Karl of Skiborne to b? a Kniphr of the Garter recalls an armisin^; <{< ry ol t)ic- rlay* when, in a- htion to political w<jrk, h-s- labour-^tl in the East End amongst the poor. Ona of his duties at a certain working mon's club \va< to receive subsci lption^ His name then r.ot known to most of the men. HowtMcr, on<» of them one night was struck by «o m-.-> thiii" in I/Oivl Wohuer's aDpearauo — thot \ia< Lord Sellx>rne's title then. — and 'ie a^k.o'l th« majna.gfr of the club for inforni ition. " I say, who's that tall chap wot lak^s the Mifxeriptioii^?" "That k Lord Wolmer " Thp man was amaz'-d. '" T« V a lord," he exclaimed, thundei^tru^k — "a real lord? But 'c ne\er said nothink ,'ilx>u(- it !"'

— Lci'd Ronald Sutherland Gower, eon of the <-^>tond anrl uncle of thf prt >; pnt Duke of Sutherland, is a inan\-~>ided manauthor, sculptor, and nn excellent judge of old china, he is Bohemian in all hi* uai= Loid Ronjltl was a favourite of Uueeri Victoria, as was his morht-r h<>fr,)e him. and had many lottfrs From her Ma-j^-tv For hn ability as a '•c-uhVor h<? i-> l^iharw best ki.own. Tho statue of Shaket,'<^rß which h? prescnt-'><l to Strat r o>-d-o:i-A\on - an example of h'<-, wcrk. and that of Sir Henry" Irving a« Hamlet ii another of his creations His portrait of Lcrd Iv-dconiffeld la now in th^ National T'ol tiyit ({.'.'lon- Lor-1 Ronald han a chir.ninj plec- rear Pen-hurst, in K<»nt, which w;i« bnilr h\ .'aino-< Xd>m\th, th". i-ivfritor of the steam hamnjer. <in'l ■> call- 1 Hammerfiehj. It was erected in tho fifth* and sir.cc ha» be°n nuKh nnpio\' 1

— (.1-en.M-dl Sir "Aicll 1^ " Hunter, who ispok<»n of <is the oo^-iblo -ivc^f r of Clcmplal WingA*? in li'^vpt, \~> very m^ intentupon he'Vin? hi- ok', "is c;i'riod out \iV)m\y'\\ ;ip(] ro t'le k-ttoi. Once, howexor, he form.l that o-n order ca.ii be tarried < ur ii,o l"?idli\ It wa- -ora« _»^ars ago in Eu\\jl, Mid (ieneral Hunter was at dinl' '■ with i^.m-e f'-i -nci-, wht'n one of his crulcil' -» enteied tl.?t 1 .? ruom and -*a.d there w .i -. a mo"oirs; o i outsif!*- anxious to f^e li'iu (ieneral Hunter could not leave the table at that moment, usi<l told the orderly

bo. "What shall I do with him, then, sir?" asked the onderly. " Oh, knock him down," said Hunter impatiently, as he turned to his dinner. Five minutes later the man returned bearing obvious marks of the fray. He saluted stiffly, and said to the astonished general, " I had a bit of a job, sir, but I knocked him down at the finish."

—Mr Latham, whose luck was against him in the matter of being the first to fly across the English Channel, is a great sportsman. H< has hunted the -hinoceros and the elephant in Africa, «nd crossed t^he Channel in a spherical balloon. He plays golf, belongs to the Skating Club and the Pigeon Club, motors, a,nd fcas thrown himself with a .vhole-hearted enthusiasm into thr new sport of aviation. He is not. however, ar inventor, like M. Bleriot, who has spent several years and a small fortune in the search 'or a practical aeroplane. Mr Latham conducted a scientific mission in Abyssini? not long ago. and brought back specimens of a number of till then unknown insects, belonging to the species which is held -esponsible for the propagation of sleeping sickness. One of these received the name >f Hcemoropota Latizami. Mr Latham's father xas English, but he himself is a French ;itizan. He was born in Paris.

— Lieutenant-general Sir Henry Fane Grant, »ho has been appointed Lieutenant of the Tower of I ondon, comes from a famous ficrh/Jing «toek on both sides, for n.is father ■ - fh<> late Fiold-marshal Sir Patric)- It rant, and his mothei wa.» the daughter of the 'amous Commander Viscount Gough. He -non his brevet of lieutenantcolonel for his services in ths Egyptian army, and his third class of the Mfdjidis for a particularly brilliant piece of work. Religious feeling running very high among the Tur»ki-=ih soldiers, a number of them mutinied. Acting wif,h remarkable promptness, Major Grant, as he was then, immediately settled the matter by capturing the mutineers. He also took part in the. Nile Expedition, for which he was mentioned! in despatches, made a. Companion, of the Bafcfa. and granted the medal with two clasps, as wall as the Khedive's Star.

—By conferring on 51. Paclerewski. the Cross of Officer of the Legion of Honour and omitting t<hs grade of Chevalier of the '^ii-dcr. the French Government, remarks the Globe, has followed a course foi which th«ve are only two precedents. Appropriately enough, those weTe created in the" ca<=e of the Polish pianist's two famous predecessors, with, whom in style and technique he may be said to Rave co much in common— Rubinstein and Liszfc. In his early years M. Paderewski knew -what it was to live the life of a struggling Drofessor of m.usic. His mean 3 were of the scantiest, and although he has sip<?9 received fees higher, we believe, than those given ro any other pianist, in hi» teaching day-s he knew tho pinch of poverty. It was at tho age- of 21 that he "burned 1 his boats" and decided to adopt the career of a \irtuoso. He was just 30 when he came to London in 1890 and created a fuxcire as mt'ch by his wealth of auburn, hair as bj his incomparable playing.

— Few, if any, of the world's mill'onaires have had a more romantic career than Mr John Wanamaker. the famous American, department store king, whose son, Mr Lewi3 Wa.nama.ker, was quietly married at St. Margaret's, Westminster, the other day. A little ovei a century ago the man who was destined to win millions was selling papers in the s-treets of Philadelphia. Both his father and grandfather eked crot a miserable existence by working in come brickfields, and it was a proud day for the old people when tihe boy came home one night with the information that he had boen offered a situation in a book store at six shillings a week. In a sihort time ne becamev a clothing salesman, in which capacity he proved so capable that in. a. yoar or two he was promoted to chief ol the department. His ambitions did not end here, for in 1861, vrifch a capital of £400, he it'odeetly started -the business which long since has become world-famous.

— One of the best stories concerning- M. Clemfmceau, the fallen French Premier. tells how he recently nonplussed a practical joker who -^nt out a number of iH-vitations to people all over Paris to a big dinner at hi* hou-\i. Sonic days afterwards M. Clemenceau was surprised to receive letters from total etrangr-era accepting "his kind invitation to dinner," and thantlng him most cordially. Now, ihe ex-Premier is a ma»i of wit, and. instead of flying into a t^mpo-i-, hi> realised that someone had been playing s>. tndk upon him, so he gave orders for a dinner, and it was duly held. His unknown guests were highly delighted at b"ing in tho company of the distinguished ptate-sman. but their ardour wa? somewhat. damp3<l when, after tho banquet, their host broke the neves tc them that theLr presence there was >eally due to a choica little joke which had be°n pcrpe-tratp^l by some- person or ppr«on= unknown. Naturally, ' the disappointed dinars haston-cxd to depart as soon. a< thov comonientlv could.

— Dpbonair and always immaculately <lre»--pd — except when working in his omr«* at Buekingiham Pal<ice, wher he takes off h:« co-it, tucks in his cuffs, and proceeds T-o d"al with hi<- Majo-rv's letter-bag — Lord KnolU-. Kinpr Kclwa'vl'*; private tecretarj', \\ lio rwontly celeb rate 1 his «eventy-second birth<lay, i> knowr for hi* ccurtlino c = arwl trriiop. He w a man of tmi'h onsklorati> .kindliness, but a 4a 4 - the same time a man of few words. Some little wh.il 0 - aeo a jour-p.ili-r, who happened to bo th« onlj oit l of hn craft at a noeting wh°re th" Kinir Di.w la a lirtle sweh. wont to Lord Knoll v^ \\u!i h:-, tran^cripT; ami a«-ke<l hi-, lordshin to tr!ano° over his copy. Lord KnolKs -t).-]-"- 1 '! tho leportev'-i hop ai! - in tho ground by >ayintr he was not pr*"-f»nt at tho me^tin:» .''Come bacV in two hour?." he .sa d Tho nre c iiian iotHrn<*i at th^ apnoin'tod tini" .in<l f^und H= ropy co'-f^oWl >n a. Mian?" h-i'v] Lord Xi ollv* had gone to tb ■» Kin? hnn-f!f and his Majo~,tv ha-d, with hi, if-ual kindline-*, hnn-°lf made the fOI 1 °<.tlOll~

Th<» new fK-h)n<r launch, converted from tho old naval nutter which foi rnally be-lon^-ocl to thp Timaru Naval Volunteers, w,n laiincliP'J tuc-cc-ifully on ifonday, 20th in-t., by the ownor 5 , M-e=s.rs Pearson and btiiith She has Ix^i-n d-ccked and fitted \\ ith a 16 h.p. engine and looks a fine fccaworthy craffc. Mi<ss Mabel Ford, a young school teacher, of Aiillbrcoic, Cornwall, was discovered in the workhouse at Exeter. She disappeared from home, and the combined seareh^d| miiitarv, police, and boy scouts ' vv *tr^|^^B lees. It was a case of loss of meiqtf^^^M

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19090929.2.389

Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Volume 29, Issue 2898, 29 September 1909

Word Count
2,228

PERSONAL NOTES. Otago Witness, Volume 29, Issue 2898, 29 September 1909

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