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A ROYAL WIN.

There is ample reason for believing that it is as a sportsman his Majesty the King has most endeared himself to a sport-loving nation and helped to win the reputation of bamg •• tiie mo<i popular man "in the world." The cable informs us that "intense enthusiasm" prevailed when his colt JMtnoru ran home a winner in the Two Th-ou-iand C4uineas, and this would be but a repetition cf the demonstrations ofvjoy which fojlowed Uip wip of Floiiwl II in the Derby, xnd that of Persimmon when the son of St. Simon aJ-o captured the Blue Ribbon of the turf. The victory of Ambush II in the Liverpool National when carrying; the royal colom-s was also creative of a scene of unparalleled enthusiasm. Minoru, who won the Two Thousand CJu-nea*!, i» one of the yearlings which his Majesty leaded from Colonei Hall Walker, and although classed as being merely "useful" when one of the leading Eng-lish critics was reviewing the form of la,t season the bon of Cyllene ha 6 evidently come on during the winter. Minoru wop one race last season, and claims an engagement in the Derby. According to an English authority, Marsh, the King's trainer,"" was angularly accurate in his judgment of tho colts leased from Colonel Hall Walker. "I like Minoru best," said the" trainer named. '-He is a bit on the leg, but a fin« resolute goer," and as a of fact the colt was the only winner of the half-dozen leased. Still, he was not good enough to be included in the Free Handicap for two-year-olds. These young-sters were headed by Bayardo. the winter favourite for the Derby, at 9.0. and vvhiKt Minoru did not get amongst them his Majesty's filly Prinoesse de Galles, wnom thi* cable informs ran second iw the One Thousand Guineas, get in at 7.12. Bayardo, according to English form, was clearly the best two-yoar-old of the season, and he will pro\e one of the moa formidable opponents \\hi<--h the royal colours will run against at Epsom. Apart fiom Bayardo there ib some likely sorts, including the American invaders who have not carried pilk in England. It will be interesting at the pre^pnt sta.KP to recall what, was written concerning "the King as a racing •nan" somp few month- back by Mr E. IT Cooper in an article published by the Observer. The p-entleman named said: — What makes the King a model sportsman in everybody's eyes, and what -would make him a great influence in the racing world if he were jiut a Norfolk eountrv gentleman, is the thoroughly "human" nature of his interest in racing. He knows a good hor«e whan he sees i(, is frankly delighted at bavin £ one of his own, is frankly disappointed when porno higlily-bre<! youngsf<nturns out to be worthless : and when ho p-r-cs to a race meeting gives himself up <o the afternoon's busins^s with an enjo>mfnt which might infect the most .sated '■<)"< latoi I'-copi" reali-e- this instinctively. .iu<l h, c i\> i-CuJ 1 l if"; and a man who v. c iM i o v 1) lao 'l^ivd •(> oon£;iotulate Ii- !vo D.:!:o vi \Y__ m::istei on winning

the Derby than he would have chaffed the Czar of Russia about having a new baby ciieers with warm personal delight when the- King wins a race. The conversation at the small royal lunch parties at Newmarket and Goodwood circles round- the racin-jj of the afternoon very much as it does in the grand stand luncheon rooms a few yards a-way, and as the King walks down the steps to hie seat afterwards with a cigar in his mouth he is mostly undoing thestrap of his race glasses and preparing- to criticise the horses which are cantering down to the pest for the next race. Newly-elected members of the- Jockey Clubstands at Newmarket (to which enclosure anybody may be elected who is proposed and seconded by members of ths Jockey Club itself) have more- than once told of their surprise- when coming- in or out of the birdcage or standing- about in somo stairway or passage at hearing a murmured word o£ apology from someone and finding that thra King was standing cloeo by them waiting to come past. There is no place in Europe where his Majesty lives so entirely at ease and without ceremony as at Newmarket. From his rooms in the Jockey Club he ridce or drives out at the usual early morning hour t'» sea the gallop on the Heath ov Bury Hill —gallops which begin in summer time at 4 or 5 in the morning and are mostly ah over soon af tei 8. With two or three friends he drives up to the racecourse jus J . before the first race, walks about freely, chatting with endless friends in the stands; is occasionally to be seen in deep conversation with Richard Marsh, who trains in horses, or Herbert Jones, the chief stably iockey, and smiles courteously at the no, infrequent occasions when, some lady sayt excitedly to her oorrroanion, .'ls tae King: here? Do show me the King if you can, and her companion-, with a nervous "Sh— h— h," glancEß red-faced and apoic-o-ctically at a gentleman in a brown mornm- suit and brown bowler hat, who n standing two yards away. In the evening the King nearly always dines out, eithe. with Sir Ernest Oaesel at McnJton Patldocks or with Mr Leopold de Rothschild a. Palace House.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19090505.2.341

Bibliographic details

A ROYAL WIN., Otago Witness, Issue 2877, 5 May 1909

Word Count
909

A ROYAL WIN. Otago Witness, Issue 2877, 5 May 1909

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