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MR ALLAN M'LEAN.

(From Oujr Owk Corrsspondekt.) CHRISTCHURCH, November 13. Mr Allan McLean, whose death occurred here this morning, came to New Zealand from Australia- in 1852, and soon after arrival purchased the goodwill of the leasehold of 10,000 acres on the south bank of the Waimakariri River, about 13 miles from Christchuroh, and soon after obtained 500 merino ewes and come horses and cattle from Australia, where he and his brothers had been engaged in pastoral pursuits for , some years previous. His two brothers— John and Robertson M'Lean — with hie mother and two sister* came to join him a year later, and for a while they lived together at Ashfield, the pastoral country abovementioned. With true Scottish foresight they grasped what New Zealand, and Canterbury in particular, would become in he near future, and they secured 50,000 acres on Government lease, which is now known ac the Lagmohr Estate. In going down to explore what was then an almost unknown region, they reached the Rakaia when it was in hierh fresh, but nevertheless put their horses to it, and were soon swimming, and were presently washed off their horses.. John, the elder brother, got on to the shingle bed, and, looking round, saw hie brother Allan submerged in the water, grasping the shingle, but unable to get up. He at once waded in and dragged his brother out. They stocked the Lagmohr run, and in 1858 they obtained information of country further south, which no white man had ever trodden. John M'Lean set off alone on a horse, and with a pack horse carrying his blanket, a tent and provisions, with a tin billy and pannikin, he spent a fortnight alone riding to and fro in that terra incognita. ' At last, coming to the Molymeux, he followed it down, got to Dunedin, and applied for 400,000 acres of leasehold. On surrey it proved to be 430.000 acres, which they obtained and stocked. The younger brother, Mr Robertson M'Lean, returned to Scotland in 1865. John and Allan M'Lean remained partners until about 1875 or 1276. and then by mutual consent dissolved partnership. John taking the North Otaso estates and Lagmohr (Xshburton), and Allan takinir the Waikakahi on the Waiao and Waitaki as hie share — a princely estate taken in the late nineties by the Government and cut up and leased in smaller holdinsp to thriving settlers. The M'Leans lived retired lives, but their hospitality was proverbial, and no man travelling by and seeking food and a bed was ever turned from their doors. At Waikak&hi Station there was a building I with some 16 bunks, and from 10 to 16 men frequently occupied thai building', were f*i in the kitchen adjoining-, renamed their . swujjb after Breakfast, and vent their way, \ making room for other comers, who invari-

ably turned up. Mr Allan M'Lean has lived for a number of years in Christchurch. It is understood that a large portion of his estate has been devoted to public purposes.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19071120.2.126.3

Bibliographic details

MR ALLAN M'LEAN., Otago Witness, Issue 2801, 20 November 1907

Word Count
498

MR ALLAN M'LEAN. Otago Witness, Issue 2801, 20 November 1907

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