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IN A NUTSHELL.

— You Yangs is to be -shipped to Sydney by this week* bo»t. _ t — The Gexsjdine _gatfwring takes place on the 26th and' 27th inst. — They are ' agitating* for the .«ppdintment - of the stipendiary steward .in .France. —Mir C. A. Jefferson -is to act as starter at -the North- Otago spring meeting; > —Mr D. Moral -hms been re-appointed handioapper fo the "Vincent Jockey >Club. — Pbaetontis and "Eclair were vmongst the delayed "passengers" on hoard the Jlonowui. — Friday of this -week i» nomination d*y for the Dunedin Jockey Cldb's spaing meeting. —At the dispersal of the Brotdland Stud (Vie.) a filly by St. Ilaria— Bivalve sold at -40 ' guineas. — Maude, the dam of "Mahutonga, is thii season to be mated 1 with the St. Simon horee St. Ambrose.

— 'Seminations for "the Dunedin Jockey Club-'s Champagne Stakes erf 1909 elope oa September 20. — .Friday. October 4, is nomination day for the North Otago Jockey Club's spring meeting. — Adria, who won one xd the minor events at the Asliburton meeting, .» a four-year-old sister to King Log. — "W. J. Taggart had c .well-deserved turn of luck at the Ashburton meeting, where Leeaide captured a double. — Solution's half-sister Trophecy won the Spring Stakes, of 300eovs, one mile, w.f.a., ■at the Kalgoorlie Cup meeting. — Condor, a ialf-teother to "Birkenfcead, wan the .Hann«n's Handicap, of one mile, at -the Kalgoolie Cup .meeting. — A catalogue of the Elcteralie yearlings to be submitted to auction in Novemebr ia to hand and acknowledged with thanks. — The Parliament of Cape Colony has rejecte<2 a bill tK»t w»s T«oeirily iniaroeliioej to legalise the -total isatnr in that country. — Melbourne papers -sbate that D. J. Price intends to take the dual National winnez Bribery to Sydney for the spring meeting. - —It is proposed to ship 1300 '-horEes from Queensland this .month to India. The col lection will include a number of racehorses.

— Stepniak'e stock won three- races*at Ashr burton, -and another winner -was out of w or xnaxe by the son of Nordenf-eldt and Steppe. — The .New Zealand Cup eandidaie Fandango registered two unplaced performances at Ashburton. This does not read like "Cup form."

— There is a horse racing at Noumea in the name of HLmalatimabatamangaya — jsl tough title for members of the ring tc tackle.

— Cuiragno, who went amiss prioT to the C.J.G. Grand National meeting, is unlikelj to be seen dut again under silk for some months.

—Mr J. E. Henrys will, -as usual, compile the handicaps for the North Otago Jockey Club and Mr H. Gourley -will handicap the trotters. — "W. M'Naught, the trainer who first in tr educed us to Kremlin, has at -present Rosine, Caveola, and a sister to the first named in work.

—As « general rule the best brood mare:, are of the low grown, wide, and roomy type, with hips somewhat sloping and wide ,«na deep in the pelvis. — Nominetione for the Stewards' Handicap c.ose on Friday of this week/ and no doubt the publication of the list will give a filip to double business. — The St. Leger gelding Casabianea, who was foaled in 1897, was> the runner-up to Leeaide in both hurdle events decided at Ashburton last week. —A. Julian went to Sydney with Haydn, and he will ride the Sou-wester gelding in his engagements- at the Australian Jockey Club's meeting next month. — The North Otago JooJsey' Club is adhering to the paid judge, and: Mr E. O. ( Duncan will again be the "man in the box" at thi forthcoming spring meeting. — Idasa's non-success over the small sticks at Ashburton suggests that she is not the "coming hurdler" she was fancied to bo prior to the National meeting. —At the Bourke annual horse sales 130 C animals were disposed of. Draught horses, sold to j£4s, buggy horses to J637, light horses to £39 10s, and ponies to £16. — Nominations for the D.J.C. spring meeting fall due on Friday, September 20, and the handicaps for the first day are booked to appear on Monday, September 30.

— The list of 'bookmakers approved by the V.R.C. appears m this month's "Calendar." There are 71 approved for .the paddock, 91 for the hill, «nd 80 for the flat. — The well-known cross-country horseman P. Johnston, who has lattery been acting as private trainer for Mr G. P. Donnelly, has started training on his own account. —It is rumoured that Seal Rock is not as healthy as he might be. It is said that a discharge was issuing from the colt's nostrils after he worked at Kiccarton recently.

— The Außtralian-bred horse Chatswortb (Auric — Winifred) is to be at the services of Southland breeders this season, and Pallas is to travel at Tapanui and Roxburgh. —At the forthcoming North Otago spring meeting the first race ia timed to start at 12.50 and the last at 5.20. These times have been adopted in order to suit the train services.

— The D.J.C are carrying out extensive alterations and improvements to their offices, and in. future will have ample room for the posting of handicaps and holding general meetings. — A ehapely filly in Golden Way got •Amongst the winners at Ashburton. She is by Pilgrim's Progress from Taurida, by Stepniak from Fallacy, the grand dam of ■Slensehikoff.

— If a horse is short-ribb^i he is light in his middle, and is nearly always a pool feeder. He has not the stomach to contain succulent food to serve, him from one meal to another.

— The .new owner of the ex-New Zealander Subterranean is Mr E. Manifold, a member of the V.E.C. Committee. It is reported that the horse is in. fair demand for the Caulfield Cup,

— Vamoose, a two-year-oid brother to T"ly« ing Fox, won the Prince of Wales's Stakes. I of 2800sovs, at the Goodwood Cup meeting, which was in progress when 'the Last mail to hand left England. — The well-performed mare Air Motor hai produced a filly to Grafton, and the advent of the newcomer should -be a -piece o> ■ good news to Mr S. Green, who reosnth returned from Eng'and. — The broken weather which -has been ex« perienced of late is causing trainees some anxiety, as a continuance of it means thai some of our horses will be backward for theii spring engagements. — Ttince Imperial, the sire of the crack pacer Advance, had two winners at .Ashburton in the shape of Claremont and Prince Bandle, who between them captured the trotting events on the programme. —At the Cobham (Eng.) sale En, Garde, a son of St. Simon and Martini-Henry's -sister Engagement, was passed when bidding ceased at 1450 guineas. The Trenton stallion Cornstalk was passed in at 930 guineas. — The Stepniak— Lady's Maid filly Maori Girl was amongst the winner* at a recent Canterbury Park meeting. At -the same meeting Dora Grey, a sister to Achilles, xan. second, in -the principal race of the .day. — Three fillies filled the places in in* South AuabralUn Derby, which me run oH the 2nd inst. The winner (-Palkda) is a daughter iof .Port Admiral :*na Oalirrhoe, by"First. King from -Cfaloe by Jlaribyrnong. — A staOan a»ho«ecfe»t *re contracted, and "brittle and .iioteka are .puffy and rßes&ylooking -sboulfl ;be avoided. Such hooks are aaoeenkted with coarseness out -ton whole conformation and a general lack of quality.

—An Engiwn «ays th«t JFlying Fox is by no -means what .lie used to be as a aire, end he .does not expect that he will ever regain his status unless >he ie removed from the stud where he now is and given a thorough change. — The Cup winner Idaalißt won' at the first time of asking for Mr -G. Payne, who purchased Sxo JBirkenh«ad gelding -*b the National sales. Idealist -may journey across to Australia *fter he Juts raced a few -times in 'his new owner's colours.

— The Auckland trotting Club itas assets totalling .£1484 more -than nts labilities, and has placed -£1000 on fixed deposit. The club ' haa iad «. most -successful season, and is con< •idering the advisa-ble&ess of .having -a rac« for "trotters only" on its programmes. — The death was announced .during tha past -week of Mr .Charles Ttoberts, who waa formerly a member of the once well-known, * -firm of Mason and Roberts, a firm of totalwa- '' tor proprietors who a few years ago wera very prominent on southern Jacecouraes. — The Musketry horse Tutugarehu is to go under the hammer at Wright,- Stepbenson'a yards on Saturday .next. It will be remembered that .he showed fair form at the last Waikouaiti .meeting, and has also some good -perforxoances in tbe iT-ox£li X&l«ra<l to bj*S credit. -*Engla*b Bow, wht> won the Trial Plato _at Aahburton. is a dmighfcer of Yellow Uose, » sister to Queen Rose, the Ann of ; St*r ' Eose, the winner -of the last- New Zealaaul 'Cup. Hex -size, Menie -England; is, -in. common with Pallas, one oi the few horses -that - ©an boast -a -strain of the' Dollar blood which, •is* so famous in 'France.

— -Hewitt) rode neither Sfoctufiorm, txot Golden Measure in their -recent engagements - in England. Both the -Multiform hoarse '-and: ■ the- other «re in Mr J. Buchanan's stable, ■from which *Hewitt holds a retainer. Evidently matters are not .-running -too smoothly with our old friend, but it is not • surprise after F. Jones's experience with the same stable. — Light or medium common-bred mazes may aav«ntageously be mated with -the thoroughbred horse for the production of , good . driving and 1 saddle horses. 'Homes thus bred - -are always in -good demand, and command high prices. It is not good policy to breed mares of the extreme cold-blooded types to ~ a- thoroughbred, the result seldom proving satisfactory.

— Other countries are making rapid strides in the breeding of bloodstock (says an "English paper), but old England still predominates in 'this, thank goodness. Foreign buyers were very plentiful tit Newmarket . and several .choicely bred! mares will -find homes in other -lands. Foreign buyers do not haggle over a few pounds when they take a. fancy to anything. —An English authority states that the Touchstone horse Scottish Chief, who. proved himself a most successful sire of females has dfsappeared in tail male. Scottish Chief ia "best known in this country as -fche sire of Scottish Lassie, the dam of St. Andrew and Clanranald. The latter -has been a very l successful aire considering how very few public mares have been-. mated .with him. —'Colonel St. Leger, In whose honour ihc great tbree-year-o'd xace run annually on the Town Moor at Donca-eter was~ instituted, ia credited with -having expressed the wist that when an owner won the race three tixnet it should be for the future called by th« name of the lucky sportsman ; but this wish has not been carried out, presumably on the grounds that "the St. L«ger" has won >a good place in the hearts of British sportsmen. v t — Windgalls -axe the result, of hard work leading on to dropsy of the joint and sur--rounding tissues. With regard to remedial measures, the best and most .lasting effects are produced through firing, though, of course, a blemish results. If the swelling is recent and small it may at times be got rid of by blistering, or the daily use of iodine ointment. If of long standing, and the horse is old, perseverance with the treatment mentioned will be necessary.

— There is a horse in England racing un-der the name of Haloya, who recenfy -won a race, and. referring to th-e event the London | Sportsman says • "Mr Mandara. the owner | of Haloya, is a, Greek, and there 13 a certain amount of pathos attaching to his racing pursuits, in that, like Mr John Hill, the owner of Mintagon, he is blind. He was not pre« sent, but a te'egram apprising him of the success of his colt was instantly sent to his office in London." —Au American exchange has it that one result of the way races are ridden -there nowadays has been a radical ihange in the methods of training. Realising that the start is about 90 per cent, of the race, practically all their horses are being trained to sprint' from start to finish, -be the race six fur'onga or a mile and n-qunrter. They are being ban-died along the line of the tense muscle work of the human athlete; jog for a few furlongs, and then a madly swift six furlongs burst, and ease up. —If you want to become famous disappear l ior a few days (says an English wntji-). T. •Mown, the -well-known Irish cross-country; jockey (who rides principally in England), was -never so famous <&s he was last week, when a great fuss was made owing to tha fact that he had not thought fit to keep his friends right up-to-date concerning his whereabouts. But Tommy turned up at the Carragh safe and sound, and indignant at th« fame thrust upon him. Thus "another racing mystery" fizzled cvi. — The London Sportsman's Continental correspondent ears that at Ostend the scene

w different to what is to be- met -with, on the • French racecourse, for in, Belgium the diligence of the police i« monopolised by their protection of the- sportsman's purse against the light-fingered gentry, while in- France it i« concentrated on the pursuit of the unfortunate bookmaker. The latter in Belgium' are licensed, and the rules of fche various clubs* assure- the correct working of their dealings with the general public. — The Johannesburg Turf Club has some old-fashioned rules. A non-member cannot enter a horse for a race unless he subscribes two guinea* to- the race fund. Another rule reads:— "J! less than 10 horses enter, or in handicaps less than 10 horses aqpept. the stewards preserve the right to declare the race Toid, or the value of the race may be reduced; three to start for each race. Last yew the club received £504 from these subscriptions to the race fund. Members' sub-s-crip*ion« came to £3891 18s, but members received £3610 in dividends out of profits. — - On the Continent an apprentice namea Svato* recently met with a fatal accident while riding Herr Anton Dreher'a Emgallo in "• selling Tace for two-year-olds, -i Emgallo was cannoned • against at ;the start, and - Svatos lost his seat. One foot remained jammed in the stirrup-iron, *nd the unfortunate- lad was .dragged several hundred yards «nd>iiiea. his, foot coming out of. the stirrup, ' Mt-waV-nung against the raits. His skull ; was fractured, a-mr- in. 'spite" oi skilled surgical attendance he died early, in the' same evening in, ihe. racecourse infirmary. , -u'JW have, had far too many oojections . lately. »n«i the "win; tie, or wrangle" business appears to be greatly on the ia6re»*e. The only penalty for this sort of -thing at pre-sent-is. 20,~ which isjthe amount to be deposited when^an objection- is mada. uhis ia"» wy Daltry amount . (s«vg ,an 3?i,sH«h - writer), and should' be largely increased. 1 Whe*big interests* are at stake, 10 times this amount would " not - stop some- owners from objecting if they saw the slightest^ possible chance of' having the verdict . of the judge upset. ' • . — Messrs -Scott and Martindale report: — Uew Zealand Cup and Stewards fi -500 to 3 Ap* and Martello, 500 to 5 Mahuf* and Full •Bate, 500 to 7J Seal Bock and Munjeot,. 1000 to 10 Paritutu and Waihuku, 1000 to 10 Master' Deiaval and Waibuku* 500 to 5 Elevation and Full Bate, 500 to 2| Astrakan and Munjeet, 500 to- 5 Grand! Slam and Munjeet, 600 to 4 Waitspu. and Toa Tuhi, 500 to 1 . Probable and, Munjeet, 500 to 2 Probable and Ballarat, 850 to 2 Elevation and Martello: Scott and Martindale also' report good business on the "treble, New Zealand Cup, Stewards' Handicap, and ' Meboum* Cup— 4oo to $. — Messrs Barnstt and Grant report the following busmsw:— New Zealand Cup— 6oo to 26 Paritutu, 400 to 16 Grafton Loch, 360 to 12J* 'Frisco, 300 to 23 Elevator, 300 to 21 Zimmerman; 900 to 10 Waitapu, 200 to 24 •Master Delaval, 200 to 22 Seal Bock, 200 to 12 Downfall. Cup- and Stewards'— 6oo to 8i Paritutu and All Bed, 300 to 2 Downfall and All Bed, 300 to 2 Armistice and Full Bate, 250 to 2J Ap'a and Full Bate, 250 to 2 ICabuU and Full Bate, 209 to 8 Master Delaval and Lupulite,. 200..t0 2r M?.ster.-Delaval Mridr Fireiron. 200 is 2 SeaPßock and Lupulits* 200 to- 2 Seal Bock and Tull Bate, 200'tb 2 Seal Bock and All Bed. -T- Latest English files show that the winning jockeys* fist for 1907 is headed easily ■fey W. A. Biggs., with 73 wins: ■ Tfien- follow- , G. "M'Call 49. D. Maher 36, W. Hajsey 85, . C. Trig* 35. William Griggs 34, O. Madden 28, H. BandaH 2i; E. Wheatley 20, W. Bokerjson 18, J. .M'Call, A. Sharpies,, H. Watts, 47; A. Temp'leman."B.Xynham, J. JRriestman, - H. Jones,' lß; J. Howard. Walter Grigga; 14; '•B. Dillon, W: Saxby, Mir G. TEursby, 13; L. I»yne, L. H. Hewitt, J. Plant, 11; C. \Heckford. F. Fox, M. Cannon, F. Bullock, 10. Frank- Wootton has eight wins to his credit, ■with others a similar number, down to a couple each. - ' — Sidney advices , state that, betting on the" A.J.C. Epsom and the Metropolitan ie beginning to assume definite shape. A strong Tun on lolaire has caused that son of Grafton, to advance 'to the' position of favourite for the Epiom Handicap. The" next best favourite* .are Luciana- and Pink T7n, at two points 9«nger, while Collarit, Forge, and Pompoiu are' next in demand. Kyeadgerie, Binnia, Camera, Lord Beauchamp, Lady Florence, iPaxam> and Virtu axe *!so in ihe market. ■Maranui *nd Moolta-n are at short prices foi the Metropolitan, and they axe several points shorter than Garches. — Wqid comes from Australia that Mr Sol. Green was « passenger frsm Engknd by the,' steamship Ornba, which recently arr-.ved at Fremantle.' The valuable collection of thoroughbred mares purchased by Mr Green are', on the White Star liner Afric, due at Albany on September 10. It is evident that Mr Green was greatly impressed with racing in the Old 1 Country, as he talks about dis- ' posing of bis interests in Victoria and taking up his residence in England, where he saw* great possibilities as a bookmaker. Per- < £aps a good meeting at Bandwick and Fleniington at' the coming spring meetings may I alter his mind. I — ; TKe Sydney Referee reports thai of the Derby candidates at Bandwick nothing is doing better than Boniform, and if he keeps xight until the day it will take something pretty" good to beat him. Maltine is showing j;ood track form, and the other day was responsib'.e for a speciaWy taking effort at seven furlongs. " Mountain Jiing is still confined to sprinting work, and he is undoubtedly the possessor of great pace. The Owl looks nice healthy, and the style in which Peru got over a mile recently said a deal for his prospects of distinguishing himself next month. Altogether it appears as if the Derby will be a m/>st interesting race. — Saraband, by Muncaster — Highland Fling, and bred by Robert Peck in 1883, was destroyed! recently at the Bomanhof Stud, in Germany, where he was sent in 1896, he having* been purchased by Baron Bleiehroder for 10,000sovs. He was the sire of Admiration, the dam of Pretty Polly; Gangway, winner of the Goodwood Stewards' Cup; Worcester, winner of the City and Suburban Handicap; Clarence, winner of the Lincolnshire Handicap; Siffleuse, winner of the Thoueand Guineas; Milford, etc. During his two seasons on the English turf he won the Kempton Park Breeders' Produce Stakes, the *scot Biennial (twice), the New Stakes, the Hurstbourne Stakes, the Rous Memorial, the Ajgtley Stakes, and the Chesterfield Cup. —An Australian exchange states that the newly-appointed stipendiary stewards took a decided stand-in connection with the running of Phonograph in the Goldfields Stakes at Kalgoorlie, and disqualified that horse, with his owner (E. M'Keon) and jockey (G. Barr), for a year. At the Ccolgardie and Boulder 'meetings the stewards did not go leyond administering cautions, and that they should have taken such drastic action on this occasion no doubt dispelled any idea that may have been growing to the effect that, after- all, risks might be taken- To make matters worse, there can be no appeal from the decision of the stewards. M'Keon won • couple oi races at* Boulder with Severity tnd Hurry Up, and is the possessor of a fairly strong string. — New Zealand' blood was very much in the" foreground at the recent Melbourne show, where Trentbridge, the son of Phaeton and Throne, defeated seven others in the ithoroughbred stallion class. . The defeated lot were Holdon, Douster, Swivel, Pj^ra(a sou of Persimmon), Kingfisher, Tom

Moore, and Little Ben. In the trotting] stallion class three New Zealanders in General Ststodish, Dan Patch, and Almont were the placed trio out of the 17 which entered the show ring. The defeated lot were Stam C, Don Juan, Turedo Chief, Hambletonian Bell Boy, Pedestal, Owyhee, Emulator, Mauritius, Clark-Harold, Financier, Radiator, Dixie Alto, Venture, and The Gossoon. General Standish also defeated Clieve for the champion prize for stallions, and Trentbridge secured the champion prize as the best stallion shown. —In commenting on the fact that Jenkino was fined £6 by the Marton stewards, a- northern writer remarks that " had not Jenkins been a leading horseman the chances are that the stewards would have dealt with | him in a more severe manner." The fact of , a rider being a leading horseman makes a | breach of the rules all the more flagrant, as small excuse can be offered' on behalf of anyone whose experience has spread over a number of years, whereas the errors of a novice are frequently, made through ignorance, and consequently deserving of a mild punishment, which would not meet the case of an offender fully cognisant of the extent of his transgression. The wfiter quoted above is on the right track when he states: " It is the bounden duty of stewards to lay it down firmly that any insulting .behaviour towards officials will entail severe -punish--ment." - — One of the most impbrttnt sales of blood stock" held in Victoria for a considerable , period recently took place at. Bacchus M»rah -j ■under the direction of Messrs W. C. Yuille and Co., • when Albert Miller's Broadland-I Stud was disposed of. The safe attracted buyers from nearly all the State*. . Sixtythree lots -were disposed of for 4432g5, an average of 70gs. - TJie bargain of Iho afternoon was .secured by S. P. Mackey, who until recently was a resident of Western Australia. Eor 200gs he purchased Everlasting, a fine roomy mare, showing a lot oi quality. The New. South Wales breeder, D. Clayton, paid 60g» for -Ruin, . a nice roomy mare, and he secured Canister cheaply, for 47$g», whilst Recruit, one of the Instep family, went to him well within her value at 40gs. Omrah, a half-sister to La Carabine, was bought by S. Miller for S4ogs. — Some idea of the profits of racing under the pari-muteul or totalisator system may be gauged -from the returns of a week'sracing held in Paris in June, during which the . greatest of all French r*ces, the Grand ' Prix de- Paris, was- run. In connection with seven days'' racing at Bois de Boulogne and two' other Parisian racecourses, £26,650 was addled by the clubs to the stekes; of this £8985. went to the Grand Prix. On the various totslisators' £581,860 was handled, *nd of this sum £196,712 was infested on the Grand Prix. Thus for betting alone .the clubs received £31,636 more then they paid out to horse-owners. Part of this sum. goes tot the Government, to be devoted to the impro'vezaenii of k.orse>breeding, and the balance to the racing clubs. As tide attendances on each day were exceptionally large, a large amount was received at the entrance gates. For the Grand. Prix 14 started. . *

* — Wbietlets are so common in England* that it does not come as a. surprise when ' we read of some prominent horse sudden being affected in that direction. There was no mention of Orby being touched in the wind" when" tie' "won tie Derty, but many who Baw him exercising at Liverpool on his return from Ireland a. few weeks ago had no hesitation in' declaring him a brdnounced whistler. This statement was made a. few days prior io .his running- in the- Atlantic . Stakes, for which he started favourite, and unless there was eomething seriously wrong with him, and he had deteriorated in consequence, it would be difficult to account for the poor showing made by" Mr Oroker T s colt in that race. Qrby, according to recent advices from England, was to be held in reserve for the Str Leger, but the cabled jreport of the result does not find him amongst the placewinnezs.

— The purchases made in England for the account of the North German Breeders' Association were recently allotted. Pour of the mares were disposed of by drawing lots among breeders who had signified their willingness to give respectively £200, £160, and £100 for Sweet Melody, La Petite Dame, and Lady Stella, who cost together aooogs, and the others were gold by auction. Hoyal Maze, with her foundling filly, and. in foal to Florizel 11, was bought by Baron Oppenheim for £900; Osella, by Orme, cost Mr Lang-Puchhof £750; Affinity, in foal to Love Wisely, and her Collar filly foal, went to the same purchaser for £700; Debutante, in foal to Matchmaker, with her Sir Joshua filly foal, was bought by Prince HohenloheOehringen for £395 ; and Juno, covered by Joyful, goes into the possession of Count Seidlitz-Sandreczki for £140, showing thus on the five mares sold a loss of about 2718g5, which comes out of the funds of the association for the benefit of breeders.

—In the Tasmanian Legislative Assembly recently a Labour member proposed that the oores-tioxx of TrHetli-er "T«ftters»ll's" sweeps be allowed to continue as at present, be abolished, or be conducted by the State, should be referred to a "referendum of electors. The fact of "Tattersall's" being a monopoly (says an exchange) seemingly troubled the mover more than the welfare of public morals The Premier did not favour -the idea of the State taking over "Tattersall's," holding that if the business was to continue it was , belter it should be run by those who knew something about it than by those who did not. Another thing was -that the abolition of "Tattersall's" meant raising £60,000 by direct taxation, and the Piemier was evidently of opinion that the average Tasmanian would sooner countenance the consultations than be further taxed. The proposal was rejected by 18 to 6, and it is doubtful whether Tasmania will ever be considered prosperous enough to seriously attempt to oust "Tattersail's."

— Latest English files state that the Newmarket July meeting waa held in ideal weather, ana it was in. keeping with things to see the King strolling about in a loose lounge suit, with a Homfcurg hat on his head, and some white sweet peas in his buttonhole, happy to have to make no speeches, and joyful in the freedom of the absence of uniform) and fr.ock coat. His Majesty's colours were carried in the Sollykoff Stakes by Simgatica, a daughter of St. Simon a.nd Laodamia, who was making her first appearance on a racecourse. This- filly has something about her head which is characteristic of her sire, and her colour is his colour, but she looks a weak, weedy, little thing, and those who. in looking over animals prior to a race, judge them by their appearance had little hopes of seeing her victorious. But when it sanie to racing, her critics were entirely confused, tor ehe galloped home alone. What merit there was in the performance the future alone can show, but no. animal could have made a more businesslike debut.

—It is possible that tha Derby winner Orby was not amongst the runners that finished behind Woolwinder m the St. Leger, as ttie following reference to hia running at the Liverpool summer meeting suggests that the colt was completely off colour: "Orby, to tell the tru-th., made few friends in the paddock. He seemed dreadfully tired, as though it was a nui&ance to so mucH as walk round,

T but that waa nothing against him, because ' . many horses of far greater celebrity than he have shown the same characteristics. What ' was against him was that he reproduced this slackness and tiredness in the race. Either he could not or would not go. He was running practically a beaten horse throughout, and so hopelessly out of it a. furlong from home that ->his jockey, after riding him for all he was worth, and hitting him hard twice, had perforce io give up pursuit, and the Derby .winner figured thenceforward icgloriously in the rear, leaving Earlston, whom he had treated with scant courtesy at Epsom, and who now was meeting him on only 61b better terms, to decisively turn the tables." i — One really likes> to see Mr Marsh a • winner. He takes it quite philosophically, as I well as he dsoes- some of the persistent runa of bad luck he has experiencedf A delightful personality himself, he is a- fit man to come into touch which his patrons, and he is thought extremely highly of by those who hay© any bueiness transactions with him. One is very apt to hear (says an English writer in referring to the King's trainer) that the lot of the professional jockey has improved by meens of the recruiting of better clasa lads to the game, but surely Mr Marsh has done more in this direction than anyone . else known at the present day. He himself was * professional steeplechase jockey, although he came of quite a good stock. Naturally a man of refined ideas and tastes, his , environment has tended to make him the 1 man he is to-day. It is a very difficult course j for anyone ■••to ,7 steer" — being known in the newspapers as "Marsh," and yet a. visitor to the King's garden party, -and wearer of the Victorian Order. On the face of it, -a- man has. to he the possessor of excellent menialbalance to be able to do the -right thing at the right time. It is by this tactful ability to k«?p up his position, and yet never be accused of not knowing exactly who he is, that Mr-March has successfully "carried" himself with admirable aplomb. — The Englisn writer "Kapier" thus refers to Noctuiform: — "I think that the loss of Noctuiform, whether effected by the violence of theft or the peacefulness of death, wculd be a blessing to Mr Buchanan, who has this week played a very funny game with his jockey Hewitt. That rider was taken off Golden Measure, who was a racing certainty for the Gold Vase, and put up on Noctuiform for the Ascot Stakes, for which he was a racing impossibility. On every hand I was told that Noctuiform would come home alone and to whosoever told, me I answered, 'Possibly — at the wrong end of the field, however.' He did not do quite so badly as that, but, all the same, ran disgracefully. After comporting himself decently for about a mile, he, in familiar parlance, 'chucked it.' He has not lost his action. What he has lost is his love of racing. And if I were in Hewitt's place I should ask Mr Buchanan, next time he backs Noctuiform, to put another jockey vp — Maher, or Higgs, or Madden. There was. a time when, at /least two' important owners were willing to buy Noctuiforra at' »• price that wouKT have left Mr Buchanan nothing out of pocket on his purchase, «aye what he has lost by way of betting. Mr Buchanan is reported to have said that he would rather shoot him than- sell him.* I fear the opportunity for sale is now over, Guns, however, remain cheap." —An important decision was given by Judge Bacon at Bloomsbury (Eng.) last month. A Mr George Cowan had *. letter from A. E. WetheralT, a- Birmingham tipster and journalist, stating that for £10 he would send telegrams adyieing him. of six "certainties." Mr Cowan sent the £10, and received six telegrams, Advising him to back certain horsea. None of the horses won, and Mr Cowan now claimed hie money back. Mr Martin' O'Connor submitted that as none of the horses w.on the consideration far the payment of the £10 entirely failed. The judge upheld this contention, and declared the plaintiff entitled to the return of his money. —It is questionable if there is any absolute method of making horses lie down whose habit ia tot sleep standing. It ia always advisable to provide plenty of room, to see that there is sufficient width of ste.ll, and ' th«t a comfortable bed i» provided. Wiiere , this persuasion fails, as it generally does, a ! good method is that recommended by Galvagne, an Australian horse-tamer. His ad.vice is: — "Tie a 7lb weight to the tail at night, and if that will not do, put on 14lb; let the weight hang just to reach bel.ow -the hock. I made 26 horses lie, down in a large brewery by this means that had never lain down in a stall before." It is probable that horses that have been induced to lie down in tßis way have at length become habituated to doing- so without weighting, but there is no absolute certainty about it. — The Newbury Summer Cup, though securing a poor entry and a disappointing acceptance, provided an intensely exciting finish, Engleman, Precentor, and Manaton racing in almost a dead line for the last 100 yards, and, ttougk Precentor dropped back at last, the other two continued the fighting up to the finish, and the result was a dead heat. The stakes were divided, and the representatives of the respective owners, th Duke of Devonshire and Mr W. M. G. Singer, tossed for the possession of the Cup, Mr Singer, as at Chester when Saucy ran a dead heat fox the Gold Vase, being successful. Perhaps the most interested spectator of the race was Hewitt, Mr James Buchanan's first jockey, who had been taken off Noctuiform, on whom he scored such fine victories in New Zealand and Australia, in order that Maher might ride. Noctuiform has- never looked so well since he has been in this country, and he was made favourite, but (says the London Sportsman) after lying up with the leaders for a mile he was hopelessly beaten, and dropping further and further into tbe rear, finished last but one. The form, taking a line through Feather Bed, was not within 10lb of that, which showed when ridden by Hewitt at Ascot. | Noctuiform has undoubtedly deteriorated greatly since his arrival in this country, but he would win races right enough if Major Edwards could get him fit. He has net yet been half trained as his training was understood in Australia at the time he was carrying all before him. — lif Calcutta they run a very big sweep in connection with the Ensliisb Derby, and "Rapier" tells the following anecdote in reference to it: "The sweep provides JE35.00C for the winner, £12,000 for the second, JE6OOC for tbe third, and £500 each for starters, a nice substantial series of prizes 1 You paj 10 rupees for a chance, and the odds are, I suppose, gorgeous SHeve Gal. ion had been drawn by someone who had adopted 1 the name of ' Aggie,' and it had been traced to the second engineer of the boat. A syndicate in Calcutta had determined to buy half the chance for £7000, supposing, quite correctly, that Captain Grc-er's colt would start odds on, and if so it would be good business to pay £7000 for so excellent a, prospect of £17,000. The syndicate had gabled to Perim, Aden, and other ports to stop the steamei and send someone tc offer the money, and the Perim branch had carried out instructions. The clerk held out the cheque. '£7000 down? I'll take it!' the second engineer eried t and, drawing a photograph frort

his pocket,* he kised' if." ' Now, Aggie, we can be married a« soon as I get ashore ! ' he rapturously exclaimed. Gambling is very wrong — some people think it is wicked; bu'. on raore ocasions it . is mighty convenient ! The captain relented on hearing the story, and allowed the clerk to re-embark on his launch. As for the lucky engineer, he got his £7000 and half of £6000 more for Slieve Gallion's place money — £10,000 in all. The syndicate necessarily suffered when the hoi favourite went down. This, I may add, is a true story." — There died at Norton, Malton (Eng.), recent'y, a notable Yorkshire sportsman, in Mr Seth Tinsley, a veteran of 93 years, whe (says the London Sportsman) in his long life had shared in many phases of sport, and had had a, most interesting career. Always slight in figure and short of stature, he at a lad of 12 entered the training establishment of the late Dick Shepherd, then at Wold House, Norton. He subsequently had good experience with Mr Richard Watts, of Bishop Burton, Beverley, and with the late Mr Will. Allen, who bred the famous Bay Malton. Deceased left the training stables, and, aftei a lucky stroke of business, set up as a country gentleman, keeping his own stud oi hunters at M*lton. Among them was • clever blood mare he h«d bought as a- io*l from Sir Charles Strickland a.nd s named An gelina. The mare (after he had won several steeplechase* with her) he entered for the jumping competition at the East of England horse show at Alexandra Park iv ±£80. Tht King (then Prince of Wales) was present, with the .Duke of Beaufert in attendance, and l his Boyal Highness took the greatest interest in the contest. Mr Tinsley'rode hU own mare himself, and Angelinas -was the only animal to accomplish the final teak cc' , the competitors — to jump "«. single anc double," a 4ft 6in fence and a water ditch of 21ft. Tb* mare actually cleared ' 27ft, and the Sing was so delighted at the fea, that he commanded the preence of the pluckj little rider, and had him introduced. Tht King asked Mr Tinsley if he could "do- tht jump again in cold blood." "Yes, sir," hi quickly responded, and, mounting the mare, he repeated the performance 'with' ease. Mi Tinsley had afterwards the honour of'luncbing with the Prince and his party — an honour the veteran was proud 1 of to his dying day. He leaves a large fami'y, one* of his sons, being Ernest Tineley, the well-known trainer, of Athole House. Norton. Two others — Harry and Alf. Tinsley-^are equally well known cricketers, having played in both th* Yorkshire and Lancashire County elevens. Deceased had been in failing health for some time, but he was wonderfully alert and active, considering/ his great age. —It may be remarked (says an English authority) that in this country the tall malt lines of blood are far too few, and this it doubtless the reason why there is so much inbreeding. Eclipse sires, in two or three lines only, are so dominating the situation that r*cehorse» generally are becoming more and more inbred, and if this goes ofi much longer there will probably be a collapse oi the English thoroughbred. At present the situation is this- Horses axe bigger and handsomer than ever they were, and some few of them— the best of any period, in fact — a'ire gifted with tremendous speed. But stejefs are -most difficult to find, and- are decreasing numerically every year. There are, too, far more roguish-tempered non-triers than . there ought to be, and far too many horses of deHcaie constitution, who collapse prematurely if they hay« to undergo any extra strain. One has oxly to go back to old Calendars to &cc how feeble are the racehorses of to-day when compared with those of a few generations ago, and yet it is pro-, bable that in a. single effort the present-day nags would beat their great-great-grandsires readily enough. C'ass in racehorses rceam great speed, and no dcubt class has improved ; but the wiry, cut-and-c.ome-ag4.in horse is almost unknown in these days, and one/ heart of far too many breaks down, while the proportion of highly-bred (and often highly paid for) youngsters which never see. a racehorse is simply enormous. By those who have brought careful study to bear on the question it is thought that this softness (which it may be caF«d for want of a better name) is due to too .much inbreeding, and, though we do not positively -assert "that such is the case, we are strongly inclined to think tha'. inbreeding has been carried to far. and that lack of, or extreme delicacy of constitution and this inclination to struggle under punishment are principally due to this cause. The present-day thoroughbred is at times a tre mendous dissapointnient. He is bred from (we will say for ihe sake of argument) the most sucessful winning strains, and a higl price is paid for him when a yearling, because some near relative of his has been a- great racehorse. But in the majority oi coses the colt or filly who is very highly connected, and about which the greatest expectations have been formed, turns out a complete failure. One tuts only to tak« notice of the t>ig number of own or half broth«r£ and sisters to celebrities who hod 'been worth as many pence (for racing) as their il'ustiions relatives were worth thousands in order tc find out the truth of this statement; but breeders go on trying year after year on the same old lines, and as- the many races must be won by something or other, they appear to be content if' a. share of the prizes go tc animals they have bred. That these same animals, if of high class, seldom \laat more than a season or two on the turf, and hav< to be carefully nursed 1 for a very occasional effort, seems to be of little moment to many breeders ; but the matter is really one of the very greatest importance, and as a. solution one. can only suggest that out-croses should be sought for everywhere.

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 3792, 18 September 1907

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 3792, 18 September 1907

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