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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Jack % Ashore hr.s joined J. Ruttledge's •table. —I* H. Hewitt did not ride Lally in the Eclipse Stafcee. — Pipi has been sold to an Auckland buyer and ha« heen shipped to his new home. — A full-eister to Zimmerman has been foaled «t the Hon. J. D. Ormond's Karamu stud. — The New Zealand Cup candidate, Arrms%ce, is reported, to be shaping well in her wotk. — "Hum South Canterbury Jockey Club have decided to appoint a paid judge to act at their meetings. — -F. Burn, mho rode Bribery in the Caulfteld Steeplechase, also scored in l*f?t year's race with Ibis. — The Gaulfield Steeples won by Mr D. J« Price's hoarse Bribery was worth HOOsovs to the-- wkmff. • —Out -of the 62 horses handicapped for the New Zealand -.Cap, only seven have received 84) or over. , — >A. yearling filly by the Melbourne Cup winner, 'The Victory, woe sold in England last mouth for 400gs. — St. wch**!, who won ihe Auckland andWellington Cups' in 1901-2, was sold at *ucfidn htet week for 15ge. ' . — -A complimentary ticket fox the Ashburtbn spring meeting is 'tS hand, and acknowledged with thanks. — The annual meeting of the Tahuna P«xk Trotting 45hib is to be held on Friday evening *t 8 ■p.m. —By a typographical error the selling price of Jolly Friar was -given in last week's same -m £90&. instead of £900. _ — Paritutu haw received 8.3 in the New Zealand Cap, or 21b lees than the burden be tews allotted in last year's race. — Seddon. . the three-year-old brother to WcJriki, ran third in a race at the V.R.C. August meeting, held on the 17th- inst. — i Ctom» Battery, Sea King, «nd a Stepniak colt ham lift A. Pringle's stable and will in future be trained by W. J. Taggart. — The Australasian reports that Bribery had never jumped a fence until four days before he won the Steeplechase at Caulfield. — Prophecy, by Phoebus Apollo, from Problem, the d»m of Mount Witte, was sold at Perth recently to Dr CMeehan for lOOOee. — The Melbourne Cup winner Acrasia is ■Qids year to be mated with the imported itor&e San Francisco. She is in foal to St. Ambrose. — Master "Delaval, who has been allotted 8.9 in the New ZeaVnd Cup, holds the time weord for the Auckland Cup.^which he -won in 3min 28 S-Seec. —An American paper,, -writing of the Squires and fictnis fight, esys: — "A tissuepaper " jaw is -j\o equipment for a man to brine to tins country." — Mfchotcrog* Ims been .giving his trainer, 7. iM'Geath. no «nd of trouble of late with « defective fore joint, but he seldom misses • ECMzning on the track. ' — The -New Zealand-bred stallion Lord Delaval, icho vm ,-reoeutly «>ld tin M«!botnra*, i« advertised to stand at Murrumbidgee at a 7-guine* fee. — Diea.ppoin.ted Owner. — "Why, if you had come sooner" you might have won by a street." Unsuccessful Jockey: "It wou'd have been a back street, then!" — 53>e programme for the South Canterbury Jockey Club* spring meeting will show sa incxeae of lOOsovs over the amount given »wiy ait J«st season's gathering. —In dteferen.ee to the recent remarks of the Prime Minister, the Marton Jockey Club Ins decided to abandon the double totalisaior at its meeting on September 4 and 5. — Master Foote. the 1600-guinea3 three-year-oH colt in Hickenbctham's stable, is xeporUd ac being kune behind. He has proved a very bad bargain so, far, for Mr Leonard. — Despite the report that Criohton ha 3 broken, there has been a tendency during the past few daya to secure "long-shot" I>ats about th« son of Lochiel for the N«w Zealand Cup. — Boomerang is reported to have "been jfoing bag guns in the Caulfield Steeples, not cracked up at a mile from home, after fighting -with his rider over the first three miles of the journey. — Dividend, the crack son of Simmer, is reported to be showing signs of lameness. It was intended to xace him at the A.J.C. spring meeting, but it is now doubtful if he will be sent to Randwick. — The fact of the A.R.C. Committee having left the appointment of handicappear for the season in abeyance, while the list of other oElosm is published, has foxmed the subject of some remark, and it can alto be said some speculation. — The Derby stake, credited to Mr Richard Croker hy his colt Orby, has been distributed in charities, and further, Mr Croker has paid off the bank overdraft of £371 on the Hospital for Incurables at Donnybrook. — " Queerist." — Jolly Roger and Jolly Friar are half-brothers. The former was got by Saracen, and "the latter by St. Hippo. Their dam, Merry Maiden, was got by Somnus, from Lady Artist, by The Paint<ir t

— According to an exchange a cable has tion showed that he had very badly injured been received from England, stating that the his stifle in the* near hind leg. Victorian jockey, F. Bullock, was fined £10, — At a sale ai blcocfetock held in Christand also suspended from riding for the re- church last ireek the Conqueror gelding mainder of the meeting, for " crossing " at Ability wa9 purchased by Mr F. Holmes Sandringham races. at 130gs. The Winter Cup winner, Id<*alist, — After much consideration the committee ™ s purchased by Mr G. Payne (the former of the Victoria- Racing Club has elected o ™* r n ?* Chivalry) at 88tes; Mr G Pa.mer to abolish the system Mt handing certain P™* 2o^ s J or as > ***** »£* J™* work over to sub-commitfecs. ±-i future all Taphand, 23gs. Mr Acton-Adams; Southern matters connected with the club will be Cross *£ «• l€ y. 96^; St. Michael dealt with by the full committee. ! M* F- Claridge, 15gs, ana a three-year-old -Merchants frequently desert a good ' *»7 6«nd-Rl»spur sold at , r>^> « • • actor -" *" In wh ** mv d ear?" asked — The Obhgado mere Bed Morn is in George. "Why, you have forgotten your the private sale list, and as there is usually lines." George laughed. "That may be a demand _for h«rees at this time of the my d ear, »nd in this comedy I am too year, she snould scon find a new owner, busily engaged to notice a prompter." And Red Mom is sound and in good condition, then tho old horse lifted his head asd and eventually would make a valuable addi- winked at the moon. tlon to any stud. —When the last mail left England Galli- — The Oaks is .older than the Derby. The nule was at the heed of the list of wiiiniDg first race for the former was in 17.79, when sires with eight winners of 13 races, worth the race fell to Bridget the property of £13 936, and ef that amountf Slieve Gallion the .Earl of Derby, who gave his name -to credited him wifli £7706. Desmond wrs the" Blue Riband of the turf, 'the first race sssorid with £13,046, won by 13 horses in for which was run in 1780. This was won 24 races. Despite the fact that Orby won by Sir C. .Bunbury's Diomed. - the Derby for him, Orme has dropped to —Mi T. Kett is advertising his thorough- "third place, with five winners of seven races, bred colt Somateria, by Bukenhead— Mef- valued at £11,662 Then follow Cylksne gunser, for private sale, and also his trotting (£3o*l), St. Frtwqnin (£7791), Marco (£7496), gelding You Yangs. These are the only and Amphkm (£5553). , horses Mr Kett retained after his clearing- — After crossing the 'ast fence in the out sale in- InvercargUl, and they also have Caulfield Grand National Steeplechase now been olaced on the market. Bribery and Blueskin got close together, —Mr J. -R. Mackenzie has imported a well- when the horses returned io the weighbred horse from Australia, in the shape of n S machine P. Cosgrove, rider of Blueskin, Chatsworth, a son of Auric (Bill o' Port- lodged a protest against Hne winner, Briland — Aura) ?.nd Winifred by -Gotdsborough bary, for baring. There did not uppesir to from Lady-Hooton by Stockwell.- Chatsworth th» spectators on the stands to hz any is a half brother to Sojourner (winner Ade- occasion for complaint, and the stewards kdde Cup) and Durbar, a winner in India. allowing for distress, which might naturally — A thr«e-year-o?d filly by Gipsy Grand be expected to be shown by the horses tofrom Rosespur, the dam of Goldspur (one of wards the «nd ot a four miles' race, decided the fastest horses ever seen on the New to dismiss the protest. Zealand turf), was sold last week at 16gs. — «• Frequenters of the bloodstock sales at She baa never raced, and, judging by the Chrietchxußch are *w«re that Mt G. G. Stead price paid for her possession laat week, is is in the habit of taking up a position close not like'y to do so with any great success. to the auctioneer's rostrum when he attends — Messrs B«raett and Giant report the the ringside* Mr Stead was amongst tibe following business: — New Zealand Cvp — 600 buyers at the Newmarket bloodstock seles, to 12J aget Fandango. 500 to 7J 'Frisco, 400 «radi the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic to 20 Master Delaval. 300 to 18 Mahutu. 300 News of July 6 contains ah excellent snapto 12 Glenullin, 200 to 12 Matuapotoj 200 to shot of a «d*-ring view, in which the New 10 Starina; Cop ud Stewards — 500 to 3 Zealand sportsman is in hfs posiMahutu— Replete, 603 to 2 Sir Tristram— tion near tihe knight of tSe bjammer. A Full Rate. picture is also given of Tragedy Queen, by — Horses seldom suffer from decayed teeth, Gallinule — Clarion, which was purchased by but because of the upper teeth closing on Mr S. Green at 1700gs. the lower ones a little on the outside, points — A.t Mr J. B. Hoggin's neeent sale of sometimes are formed w*ich lacerate the Tradings bred at the Elmendorf Stud, cheek or penetrate the gums, creating a which lasted five days, 228 lots were sold tenderness that prevents the proper mastica- . *°r 128,400d01. The highest-priced yearling tion of food, annoyin c the horse, so that he I 8 « chestnut colt by Star Ruby (by falls «.way very rapidly. Hampton out of Sceptre's dam) out of —An exchange reports that, it is doubtful Graeiosfty, for -whom Mr Duxhell gave if any horse at Rand-wick has wintered so 6100dol. Mr H. B. Duryea gave SOOOdol for well as Poseidon, end though he has done * « a y ««>l* ty Watercress out of I/inda, Vista, any amount of work of late, he is still »»d Mr A. J. Joyner paid 4500d0l for a lusty and above himself. Recently he went «<"* by Watercress out of Sister Jeanie, with that strapping New Zeak-ider, Apologue, a*d 4800dol for a Goldfinch colt out of and ran mine furlongs' on the grass without Duchess of Towers. Two youngsters by much trouble in 2min 2sec. ' Royal Flush— winner cf the Royal Hunt — Amongst the purchaser* at the New- Cup «nd- S4ewwrdV Cup— fetched 2000dol market bloodstock sales was the Australia *-Pieoe. owner Mr Fielder, who paid 680gs icx Bright ~ I>unng the four days over which the reSteel, a three-yeaT-eld son of St. Simon and «ent. sates ai NewmarlFrf, England, extended Glare (dam of Fkre, the winner of lae4' *•» i** 8 dwposed of realised 67,546g5, ,as year's One Thousand Guinea* and the Middle *g*<inst M9,79%s last year. Of the latter Park Plate of 1905), -who cost 1700g» as a f? 01 . hxxwever, the dispersal of Mt J. ye*rling, and has never carried colours in M-Uskers stud accounted for 84,195g5. The public. folloiwing are the results of each day's sales : —An esteemed correspondent sends word Monday: Brood mare, foals, and etalthat up to date the failings at the Hon. J. «ons, 28,930g5. Tuesday morning:, Horses D. Ormond's K&ramu stud includes fillies ln training and yearlings, 9293g5. Tuesday from TrentaltO (Trenton — MontaltO), Solitaire -&^"=e: Horses in -trs-ining and yearlings, (Eirid-spord— Solitude), and finooze (Flint'ock Wednesday morning: Yearlings, —Lullaby); whilst Hippolyte (Dreadnoughts- £?7^> s - vJ 4 " 6^ 117 «^ning: Yearlings, Hippona) has produced twin colte. All the f^*i« 8 - morning:. Yearlings, above were sired by the imported horse Bir- ii;" 55^ 8 - _ Thursday evening . Yearlings, kenhead. * 67,546g5. —At a meeting t>f the Auckland Racing — ±h6 i*»lgian Revue de Cavalerie estiClub .Committee, Mr George Morse was mates the horse population of the world at reappointed handieapper. The programmes 80,000,000, of which 41,000,000 are in Europe, for the season were submitted and paesed. 19,C«e;O00 in North America, 11,000,000 in The total amount allolt-ed in stakes is £25,100, Asia, 6,000,000 in South and Central America, an increase of £2640 as compared with Uwt 2,000,000 in Australia, and 1,250,000 in year. The added money to the Great Nor- Africa. The horse- population of Europe is ■them Derby of 1910 has been raised to estimated «a follows: — Russia, 22;000.000; lOOOeots. Germany, 4,184,000; Austro - Hungary, — The report and balance sheet of the 4,020,000; Great Britain, 3,000,000; France, Australian Jockey Club chow an excess of 2.O00.CO0; Roumania, 864,000; Italy, 742,000; revenue over expenditure for the year of Sweden, 525,000; Denmark, 449,000; Spain, £1910. The total money paid in stakes was 397,000; Bulgaria, 344,000; Turkey, 300,000; £45,178, of which £34.150 was added moniey t Holland, 285,000; Belgium, 242,000; Portuwhidh this year is to be increaced to £37.100. gal, 220,000; Servia, 180,000; Norway, The enlargement of the grandstand is cost- 161,000; Switzerland, 109,000; and Greece, ing .£22,000, and a number of other improve- 100,030. memts are contemplated. . —Dr Houser, . a well-known American — Respecting the lowering of tihe steeple- veterinary surgeon, recently performed a dhaee jumps *t Flemington, the chairman of peculiar operation on a horse. He pulled a fbe V.TLC. at -fibs annual general meeting tooth which had grown from, the horse's said that the jumps had not besu lowered, ekull just be'ow the. ear. The tooth wae With -the exception of two, they were just extracted, and w«s saved as a specimen. It as high aa -ever they were. The ttone wall is a perfectly-foTnied tooth, but had oavsed and the- log wall had been lowered, but trouhle in- the unn«tural position where rfc there were plenty of 4ft fences there, that had grown, affecting' the horse's hearing, were quite big -epough for any bosses. Cases of teeth growing in unnatural posi- — Lost season the brilliant colt Collar it tions on horses h#re been known to occur was kept busy on the track, and a similar before, but "such cases are rare. Parts of fa/t* -will probably bo his lot during the the roots of this tooth were so firmly impresent year. He c'aims important engage- bsdded in the bone of the skull that menta at 4he A.J.C: meeting, but is »p- they had to be sawed off. The tooth and the parently already keyed up to concert pitch, horse from which it was taken were mason August 10 he was raced at Rosehill in spected by many people. a six-furlone- event. He had to carry 10.5, —The report of the committee of the Taand was beaten by a length and a-quarter in huna Park Trotting Club for the season 1906lmin 14i«ec. 07 states that the balance brought-forwaTd from — After he bad appropriated the English la?t year was £187 5s 4d, and after paying Derby with Orby, Mi Crcker made an offer £350 "more in stakes, the year closes with a to Captain Greer to run Orby against Slieve credit of £413 12s lid. This should be satisGallion in a match for a substantial wager, factcay to members. The commi-rtee decided over any dista-nce from five furlongs to three to further improve the racing track by widenmiles. Mr Croker's only stipulation was ing the home straight. This work is well in that the proposed race should take place in hand, and should be the means of greatly Ireland, but Captain Greer declined the pro- improving the harness races. In accordance posal, recognisinjr very probably that Orby with the rules, the president, vice-president, •was the better colt, at all events then. _ and three members retire annually. Tho fol- — Maniopoto has been mode top weight lowing hare been proposed for election: — for the New Zealand Cup, and has lib more President, Mr W. J. Gore; vice-president, against his name th&n he was ewwrded kst Mr G. Hodges; committee — Messrs T. Elliott, year, when M»hutonga was in the pride of L. C. Hazletl. and R. Rutherford. As there place, with a burden similar to that allowed 1 are not more than the required number, they the son of Soult. Maniopoto has not raced will be declared elected in due course. in this country since he won the Hawk-e's — The British Dominion Two-year-old Bay Cup, of 1905, .and ibis last win -was in Race at Saoidown Park is the only race run tho A.J.C. Metropolitan. Handicap, in which iv England in which foreign horses are he carried 8.0, and went the journey in barred, the conditions stipulating that it 2.32 J. shall be "for two-year-olds bred and traintd — According to a Sydney papsr Maranui, in the British Domniiane." The finish whom the veteran Dan O'Brien recently for that event, decided on June 29, curiously brought across from New Zealand, is a. good enough, was fought curt; by an Englislx-bied sort of a ■three-year-old x>lt, who favours colt (Bolted) belonging to a South African in style his paternal grandsire, Malua. owuer (Mr D. Frazer), ridden by an AmeriMaranui has never yet raced in public, can jockey (D. Miaher). He beat an EngHe is a lengthy bay, by Malatua, a son of lish-brcd filly (by Yette) belonging to an Malua, from Heriot, a daughter of Carbine, Australian owner (Mr W. Clark), ridden by and was bred by Mr O'Brien, who also a Niew Zealand poefcey (Hewitt), with, an brought over a nice two-year-old filly named Irish-bred filly (Call Bctd) belonging- to an Chanac'ie, by Uhlan. English owner (Colonel Hall-Walker), ridden — A regrettable feature of tho Caulfield by a jockey (l<ynham) born in France, third. Grand Naticna.l* SteopleehaFe was the seri- A short price was taken, a-bout Bolted, but ous accident which befell the crack performer his backers before half the distance had Bellis. At the logs at the top of the hill been covered regarded their money as lost. last time, round ho struck very hard, and He put in some capital work in the last as he was obviously disabled, A. C. Scott, garter of a mile, and happening to find his ruler, promptly dismounted. The horse a lucky opening on the rails, beat Hewitt's ■with difficulty reached the veterinary hos- mctun-t by a head. pital close t? the course, aad an examinst- — .Jfew Zealand racing clubs do not take

kindly to the idea of stipendiary stewards, and at the recent Racing Conference a majority of the delegates present showed themselves completely out of sympathy with the proposal to appoint four. Why there should be such a strong objection to the stipendiary system (E*ys the Sydney Referee) is hard to say, for if half we read in some New Zea-and papers is correct^ it would banefit racing in that colony. The system has had a fair trial here, and works well. Of course, it would be absurd to say that the presence of the stipendiary stewards at our meetings has entirely stopped crooked running, but it bas minimised it, and that is as much as could* be hoped for. Stipendiary stewards no more than anyone else enn take in ell tha-t happens in a race, but the mere knowledge that such officials are on the lockout for offenders has a controlling influence on many owners, trainers, and jockeys, who niigtit otherwise be inclined to take very big risks. — A veterinary surgeon at Montmirail, in the Department of the Marse, about five years ago, had a horse which acquired remarkable skill in " unfastening doors. Hewas kept in a stable under a loft, whence the oats were sent down through a wooden shaft, at the lower end el which, about 4ft from the ground, was a litt'e door sliding in grooves. The horse learned t# lift up this door, and allow the oats to Sow out op the floor. When it was discovered that he did this the door was fastened by means of a wooden peg driven into the shait. The horse drew the peg withont the least lifficulty and got the oats again. Then he was put in a box in another stable, the lower door being bolted outside, while the upper half had a small door secured by a bolt inside. The next morning both bolts were found unfastened, and the horse was loose in the yard. Mons. Guenon, author of a very interesting work called " The Mind of the Horse," went io Montmirail to see this animal, and photographed him in the act of opening the oat shaft door and unfastening bolts. — The action of the C.J.C. stewards, in carpeting the owner of Needlework on account of "form displayed over a fortnight previously was so unusual that it has naturally created a good dea*. of discussion in racing circles. The period which elapsed between the Wellington and Riccarton meetings is a little longer , term in which a retrospective view of a horse's running i« generally taken by stewards, and for the reason that a horse can be improved a great deal in a couple of weeks. Cut apart from the rights or wrongs of Needlework's form, it is pleasing to note that the C.J.C. | stewards have methods- which would be adopted by a stipendiary steward, and if the i officials of ether olubs acted in a similar j manner the paid official would not be so ' greaitly goaissed as he is at present. By comparison, however, Needlework's owner appears to have been harshly treated because whilst the basis of the club's action w*s spread ov«r 17 days, many things which occurred under their immediate supervision were allowed to pass without official notice. Non-triers were not entirely conspicuous by absence, and the C.J.C. stewards appear to have exceeded their powers on the one hand, and on the other failed to detect infringements which were subjects of paddock conversation. A curious invention bas been patented' in America to lessen the risk which horses run of being burnt to dearth in fires that take place in stabl«s. Ola stablemen sometimes maintain that under the influence of fright a horse will actually run into a fire, and that it is hard to get him to leave the stables. 11 s reason fbr the superstition is that the «tall is the horse's home, and it is the only place in which he believes himself to be safe. A horse wil 1 never rim into any other buroine building besides his own, or even pass a bonfire il be can help it; but when once he scents danger he tries to get to his stall — hi* horne — and when once he reaches there c«m only be driven away by fright or shock superior to his dread of lire. The new invention consists, therefore, of a releasing device attached to- a water-pipe running through the building. In each stall is a nozzle, and should the stable catch «m fire the turn of « handle brings the nozzle to the horizontal, releases the animsals, and sends a powerful, almost an explosive, spray of water into the face of every horse in every stall. The spray reaches the horse whether lying down or standing up, and once in the gangway they cannot enter any other stall without facing the same frightening deterrent. In the gangway they must remain, and the task of getting them out of the stable is much simplified. — Careful attention to the tt-ate of the bowels of their foals should b* paad by all horee-breediers frcm the very hour at which the young ones are dropped. This is because there ie « ddspesition on the part oi most foals to be- very constipated at firs*, and l«ter on they are excessively liable to suffer from diarrhoea. The former trouble is often surmounted naturally if the foal is able to get the first milk o! its dam; bu* if, for some reason, this has io be drawn off, there is always a ch*nce of the bowels becoming confined, and if so, serious developments may follow. A dose of castor oil will, however (say» an American authority), usually put things right; and should diarrhoea appear aubsequenlly, a «imua* remedy may be administered in order that the bowels may be cleared of impurities. After that, small dosejl of bi-caTbonate *jf eocta may lie tried, and if the foal is old •enuogh to eat boiled rice will often, check the diarrhoea. It is ahvajs desirable, however, to trace the causes of the disarrange-me-n-t of the bmvele of the foal, and if this course is pursmxl it will not unfrequently be discovered that the quality or' condition of the dam's milk is at the bottom of the trouble. If ihe supply i» deficient, the foal will have to ba given an allowance of cow's milk and water in the proportion of three parts to two, a little sugar bsing added to the mixture, and this will generally provide sufficient nutriment for the foal. — The annual meeting of the Victorian Owners and Trainers' Association was held a couple cf days before the last mail to hand left Melbourne. The report, which was adopted, called attention to the expense of racing and the inadequacy of the stakes, and stated tbat further representation had been made to the Victoria Racing Club by the association for additional relief in -this direction. The chairman, W. Reed, stated that, on the question of handicapping, he ■was a strong advocate of the system prevailing in England of a triumvirate of handicapperß. There had lately been eome> extraordinary vagaries on the part of many of the weight-adjusters, and some nasty things had been said about fb© htsndicappers outside. It was very un-fortunsite that some -of them were betting men, though, of course, they did not bfet on. their own handicaps. BuT there were many ways in •which they could do a good turn for themselves. He would like to ccc all cheats and swindlers in racing dealt with in opem court, in the same way aa ordinary criminals. The only way to reach the professional punt«r=, who were responsible for I'ine-tenths of the mischief, was to make llieir offence punTfehable by law. It v<»s de-

cided thai the committee should go into tEe - matter of handicapping, and the desirability) of a triumvirate on tie lines of the chairman's suggestion; and also into the formation of a properly-constituted court of appeal. * ' — Bribery has .given the lie to his hurd'e race running at C&ulfield, and those who . backed him to win the double were unlucky. In the Hurdle Sace he knocked up at two and a-half miles. In the Steeplechase he was going as .trong* as a lion at the end of four miles, and fairly outstayed Dog of "War, who had outstayed him in the Hurdle Race. Bribery's victory shotild bricg it home to Mr Maitlund that he must change his mode .of handicapping hurd'e-roce horses for steeplechases at Caulfield. Mr Maitland would never make Bellis give weight to Bribery over hurdles, and yet Bellis had to concede Price's horse 151b over fences. In the race Bellis ran well, but had not the ghost of a chance against Bribery, and if Dcg of War had been ridden aa Bribery and Cardinal were, hurdle-racers would have run first and second. F. Burn and Dickenson "kept to the inside panel, whereas Sutherland was content fco keep Dog of "War three or' four panels out. and he also went very wide at the turns. I don't suppose Dog of Wax is anything like the equal of Bribery at "the weights over either* hurdle* or fences, -but F. .Burn counter for so much among, preaeat-day riders that t have no hesitation in writing that with thei crack on Dog of ' War " he would probably have won. The Dog must have travelled ' much further than either Bribery or Cardi- ' nal. Bellis sp,lit one of his stifles, and was in a. bad way after the race, consequently) * hiar form was not trne. — [Sport. I£d. 0.W.1j — The people behind Bribery (says Mel- " bourne Argus) " 'aid off " a good portion of their money for the Caulfield 'Grand National Steeplechase, which accounts for the geld- ' ing being co easy in the betting at the last' moment. Bribery was very sore on the previous Friday,, and on Saturday was walked from Mordialloc to Caulfield. with the idea, of making him freer in his movement!, and there did not appear inucli the matter with him when he took his preliminary. Price intends io take Bribary to New Zealand, but may .first run him. in Sydney if he Tceeps «11' tright. As Phaotontis and other MaosiSuool .steeplechasers will be in Sydney about this period interesting racing may be anticipated. — The stewards of the N!bw South Wales Trotting Club Have (says the Sydney Referee), been kept busy lately inqmring into the bonp, fides of tie -chestnut gelding which raced In Sydney ts Dutchy. After a lengthy inquiry, the stewards decided *hat Dutchy was iden-* tioal with Perewiti, and disqualified W. Bennett, of Woonona, and the gelding Pere-i witi, alia* Dutchy, for lile; and James' Tumeth was disqualified for 12 month*. Dutch? only won one race in Sydney — viz.," the Tramway Handicap — which' race he won last August in 2min 35£ sec. Perewiti has a winning record of 2m£n '26j6ec, put up at the Plumpton Park (N.Z.) meeting. The following, is a description of Perewiti; alias ~ Dutchy, and secretaries of ' 'dotting clubs ■ should jnake a note of it : Chestnut gelding; - aged, about 16 hands; white star on fdre--lieed, with white etreale down- the face, -widen-" ' ins to the nostrils ; branded near shoulder4HE; short tail. Perewiti is- a pacer. —By the San* Francisco mail which was* delivered in Melbourne on August 14 Mr' J. "Wren, under w&oae engagement the- Atib-;' traliau . boxer, "Sill" Squires, went toAmerica to fight "Tommy" Burns, tar the . championship of the world, -received several' interesting letters- The most important wa< from Squires himself, and it read as fol-> lows:— "San Bafael, July 15. Just a'fetf lines to let you know that I have had bad luck with Burns. I trained hard, got^a* well as I -could, the weather agreed with! me, «acl I got • fair cleaJ. Ther« is m«' thing much to say about the fight. I wM on the alow aide. Burns landed on me first, and I never got over it until he hit ma right out. It was ft disappointing go. $ have gone off * hit, and no doubt the other, man is undema-ted. He is a laifly good fighter, and if I had got one the first lounff no doubt I woxild, have made a good fy^b* of it. That is all I ©an aay. It is had* luck for you 'to do' your money. I am sorry for you, and a" so for other good sports wh backed me. Barney Reynolds and I have decided to go to work for «• while. I think it will do me good. Be -the agree-, ment: you have left it to Barney, and he and I have mutually agreed to break off the contract. I am sorry that 1 have put you to so much trouble. I have had six different offers to fight. Burns wanted to fight me six rounds — no decision-^-at Philadelphia. He wanted to make a convenience of me. I also had an offer of a go witto Flynn at Ikj« Angeles. There is no use of them talking fischt with me. I intend trying work for a while. I wfl now rinse offc H«p--ing to find- you., enjoying good health, and thanking you for past "fswiwa..".. . _

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2789, 28 August 1907

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2789, 28 August 1907

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