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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Mir A. Moss is quoting business on the National treble at 1000 to 1. — A rising -two-year-old half-brother to Mahutong.a in training at Hawke's-Bsy is stated to be of very attractive appearance. — The ObJisado-Misa Betty filly is shaping well in her sprinting a-t the Forbury. — Santa Clans bruised one of Ms feet a few days ago, but a brief spell is expected to put him right again. " — lionheart and Bellis were io be 1 offered at auction at th« conclusion of the V.R.C. meeting. , Pipi and Petrovna continue to get through fairly Umient t*eks at the Forbury. — July 26 is general entry day for the C.J.C. National meeting. . — Nominatione of sure© for "the. Timaru Sires' Produce Stakes close on August 1. — A payment for the C.J.C. National Steeples, Hurdles, and Winter Cup is due -on the 26th inst. ' , — Applications for trainers' and riders licenses must be made not later than Satuxa — According to the Australasian, Bribery started at 33 to 1 fox the V.R.C. National HurdOes. . , , . _ — Exnioor and Mam were scratched at 9 am. on Monday for all engagements at the Grand National meeting. —Magical, the brother to Slow Tom, continues to do good striding work at the Forbury, but he looks rather big in condition. — According to the National handicaps, the difference between Kiatere as a 'chaser and hurdler is 401b. — Mr J. Loughlin leaves for Wellington this w*ek, and after spending a few days in the Parliamentary City travels on to Sydney- — Ona English punter is said to have laid 6300 io 4000 on Sli*v« Gallion a- few days pnoj to the decision of the Derby. Harvest was scratched for the Winter Cup at 11 25 « m.. and Pretty Maid for the Grand National Hurdles at 0.45 p.m. on Thursday. . St. Kooringa is being supported for tfte National Steeples in doubles and trebles. ! Principally because he is credited with having a juniper's chance. • — Gwendoiina, the promising daughter o£ Female Franchise, displayed form m her laces at Wingotui which suggests she is i entitled to a Winter Cup chance. St. Xooringa, the local candidate for National honours, s+ruck one of his knees whilst being schooled recently, but the mishap is not regarded as being a serious injury. — Somatena struck hiwseif whist doing a gallop last week, but fortunately he made a complete recovery after being a bifc Lame for a couple of days. — The interest taken in Slieve Galiion, the defeated Derby favourite, is instanced by the fact that biograph views cf him at exercise were a feature at one of the London theatres. — It is understood that there is a prospect of Master Delaval being sent over to Australia with a view to fulfilling his engagen'ont in the Melbourne Cup. — Helen Portland is stated to be training on nice'y a.t Wanganui, and there is « good. prospect of her fulfilling engagements at th« C.J.C. meeting next month. — At a Warwick Farm meeting (New SoutH Wa'.es), held on June 29, Brazier, a halfbrother by Projectile bo Red Gauntlet, was> amongst the winners during the day. — Kiaiteie. the top--weight in the National Steeples, has started twice previously in the race. Last year he carried 12.0, and in Inniskillen's race he carried 12.5. — Waiterere and Phaetditis are the ruling favourites for the National Steeples, and Cuiregno and Paritutu occupy the same position in the Hurdles. — Queensland's champion trotter, Harold, who has been failing for some time, was shot recently. He held the Qtteensljmd mile record, made 12 years ago at Eagle Farm-— 2min 222 sec. —It is reported from Australia that Seddon, the rising thxee-year-old brother tea Wairiki has been substantially supported to win the Melbourne and C'aulfie'.d Cups and V.R.C. Uerby. — Taking a hue through his handicap in ■the National Hurdles it would appear that Paritutu has am excellent char.cc of scoring =.* Wellinoion wW« lt» has less to caxiy than he will have to take up at Riocarton. — A Christchuroh telegram states that Romany King wm scratched for all engage-

menfs at the C.J.C. Grand National meeting at 0.45 p.m., and Maniapoto was scratched for the Winter Cup at 4 p.m. on Friday. —If Buccleuch could be landed fit vnA well at the post for the Winter Cup h« would require a power a beating. Ho is just the sort to score in such a raoa, aa he is up to weight and brilhant up io a I mile. , — It is not a case of "like father, ike I son" with Medallion and him son habß&am. ' as the former is standing at XSgs, and J>» latter's owner wants a large mother of mans at twice that figure before ha will send. Ms crack to the stud. — Some of the field which oontogtafl th» last- National Steeples have travelled a journey since they last ran between th* flags at Riccarton. Playfair has since wwn. in. England, and Bongoa has travelled » th» "happy hunting 'grounds." — Phaetontis, who won the laei National Steeples with 10.6, has been allotted 11.* in -the race to he decided next month. Inniskillen, who won in 1908 with 9.13, has been allotted 10.7. Cuiragno, who scored m. fcwfc year's Hurdles with 10.6, has been asked xt - carry 11.0 in this year's race. — Against Flora-Mac, who won the last raoaat the recent Kalgoorlie meeting, a bookmakac laid £100 to £1 and d&Oa to £2t just before Hhm start of libe race. The late Fted Swindells would have said, "That man must have been hungering for £3." Flora Mac paid £L 7is in the straight-out totalisator. -s- Mr Wren expresses his determination to run. off his b« £9000 raoa next November, potwrthetanddng the fact that the V.R.C. regn- t lation relating to- the disqualification of horses running on unregistered course* has been sanotiipsaed by the Government. —Mr J. Wren ha* sent an application to the Chief Seoaetary for pennisaioK to hold a charity race meeting at Richmond (Melbourne) on July 11, the proceeds so be eaoaliy divided between tee Melbourne, Womwke, mad St. Vinoenf s Hospitals. — Nominations for the. positions of officers for the Auckland Racing- dub closed aa Saturday. The Hon. E. Mitehelsan. wa elected unopposed as president, and Mi H. T. Genie as vx«-ptesiden.t. For the election of five committeemen 10 nominations hava been received. — The biood stock breeders of Franoe are agitato ng against the restrictions placed on betting in that countey, and have petition-wi tha Minister of Agriculture on the subject. H* hs« promised to pat the matter before ha Select Committee deprived to examine all questions connected with racings — . The French four-year-old Mainteaoa, who ha 3 been retio-ed from the turf, cost Mr Vanderbilt £324- as a yearling, and won him £36,331 in stakes. In all, Maistaoon woa 11 races ont of 16 starts, and only «noa Biased a place. A stained tendon brought about his retirement. —It is an indisputable fact (says an American writer) that to-day- we have no* mere, than three or four boys competent to handle a horse a-t the post, to control him, keep him in hand, gather him and "get away" with a field, or near it with a sluggish mount. This in demonstrated start after start, yet only tha 1 official starter is- blamed for it. i —It is reported from West Australia that ■ the- "dope" had been used on certain annuals ' before running at the recent Kajgoorli* meetj.iug, and that the matter was in £he hands of I a private detective; who, however, up io dais had failed to find out anything. X has oatMed -a great sensation over there, and sereontl trainers feel unsafe as regards tfcek. ch*r£ee. I — Since the declaration of th» handicaps for the principal events to be decided at the Riccarton National meeting, the selections made by double backers are somewhat varied, and by no means confined to a few name*. There is, - however, amongst jhe wi«eaores a disposition to co for "Waitszem and Phaeiontis in the Steepies and Cuiragno ' in the Hurdles. —On May 27 GaMinule easily headed this , season's winning stel .ioca in England, with a I total value of 16659. His nearest rivals are. Orme, £4802;. Desmond, £3957; I*ov« Wisely, £3949; Marco, £3883; Ampliion; J3108; Pioneer. £2822; St. Frusquiu, £3890 ss; Pietermaritzhurg, £2563 10s; Janissary, £3174; IHamond Jubilee. £2122; Bill of Portland, £2083; Son of Mine, £2000; Matchmaker, £2349. j — The Special Commissioner of the London Sportsman was one of the critics who must have been considerably surprised by tha result of the Derby. After Orby had run" a mile and a-h»lf race at BaldoyW on May 34 he stouted the idea of that colt beating Slieve Gallion, and, furthermore, ea.pi wed: his belief that the latter was superior to Polar Star. He regarded Galvani as Slieve Gallian's most dangerous Derby opponent, but tboiignt thwfc the la&er only had to •oeoapa accident to win. — The State Executive Council have passed the regulations giving the V.B.C. complete control of the Flemington racecourse, and authorising the V.R.C. to charge the following fees per yea*: — Bookmakers — PacS&ock, £75; hill, £25; flat, £7. Clerks— Paddock, £5; hill. £2; flat, £1. Jockeys, 10a; trainers, 10s; and £1 for each horse trained on the conrss per half-year. Hawkers, 5s per day. The V.R.C. is given power to eject those who da not comply with the regulations. — The acceptance* received for the Winter Hurdles to be decided at Wellington are disappointing in the f»ct that nearly- all th« best horses engaged have dronped ant of he race. Cuiragno. Exmoor, Lady- Hune, Cruesot, Shrapnel, Landlock, Ability, and BI«ck Reynard are amongst those included in he> missing list. The- presence of some of ha above lot would have made a oonsiderabla difference in the interest taken in the- race, and probably shed some light on tba National Hurdles. —If he can be landed at the post fit and well, Tha Mohican is- entitled to a National chance with 10.10 on his back. Soms of his performances over th© **Mnail sticks' are as follows : — Kildtoo Hurdles. 2 miles, won with 10.13 in Smin 4» 4-ssec; Spring Hurdles. 2 miles, won with 11.6 in 3min 51 4-saec, and Port Ccoper Hurdlea, onca round and a distance, won with 1J.13 intern 11 3-ssec. A spell of stud work, however, dees not assist a horse to repeat his racing form, and the son of Maueer will requaw to show something on the track before he aaa be given a winning prospect. —We hear (says the Louden Sportsman) that several of his Majesty's borsw* in jKwming and brood mares will shortly be offered for sale by auction, and tt» sale will be an. important one; bnt this must not be- jaken that the King intend* in any way. to withdraw has patron ege from horse-racing. On 'dhm contrary, his Majesty's love of the sport is aa keen and his appreciation of the practical good which it does to the country as emphatic as ever, and he has not the smallest intention of withdrawing from She turf, haft he is of the opinion that there is too mncfa of one blood at SandringlMun, and has determined to make a change. — Messrs Bamett and Grant report the following business on the Grand National double:— 1000 to 2 against Hikairoa-^ldasa, 900 to 7 Romany Lad — Landlock, 900 to • Evenlode— Paritutu, 800 to 4 Loch Fyne— Gold Du&t. 800 to 2 Hutana— Top Rose, 800 to 2 Inniskillen— Kiatere, 800 to 2 Kiatere — Kia-tere, 800 to. »' Kia.ter« — ImU, 705 to 9 Waiterere — Creusot, 700 to 7 Romany Lad— Mahoe, 600 to 9, Waiterere— Merriwai, 600 to a Slow Tom— Top Rose, 500 to 5 Fihaetontia

—Ability, 600 to 2 Ph«tonti«-<JoH B&stT SOO i© 3 Waiteeere— Te Uira, #30 to 2 Needle--wozk—Needlework, £00 to 1 SiHcia—Eaipetipeti, 609 to 1 Pawa— Prospector. — The Wellington Racing Club's winter meeting commences on Sanxdaj next, and -will be ewse to attract a good deal of attention evtm. from tiiose who regard it as a curtain-raiser for £h» Riccarton fixture. There has been a considerable- shrinkage in ihe list orjginsDy engaged in the Winter Hurdles, bnt there is still ample material left to furnish a good xace. A good fiald has accepted in live Wdlrngtan .Steeplechase, said ft should provide a cuntest well worth going -a journey to see. The minor events have filled well, and ibeto is ••very indication of a successful gathering taking piece at Ttentham. — "It has always been my opinion" (says "Javelin") "that the day upon whioh tie -weights are declared is the betft time to endeavour to the- winner of * big bamdscap. Judgment is then formed on facts and occurrences, snd nert warped hy 'information' •übesqoeritty gained sad. «cera ly misleading. Of coarse, everything depends on- hcrees trAmng on said standing sound preparations, Tm* -that is a matter waioh oannot/b* dealt •with im aß*ioip»tian_ Assuming tha* all goes -well with regard to training; opera&ns, if I ■were asked to pick a- doable for ibe -Caulfield Cup and Melbourne Cup at the present tame, I would nan&e Macarin and Dividend." -i-The £ng&3A jockey- Randall, an eocamateuf, is aigb}j connected. The London Sportsman, in drawing a±£ezrfion to this fact, eaxl in a xaoehi Woe: "TL» victory of Brother Bill in the Trial Selling Plate at Newmsrkes yesterday was followed by the victory of Billy Boy in a welling plate a couple of hours fefer, and the fact flfaot Randall rode both winners is s matter for congratulation, because this was the jockey's- first appearance in the ■addle sinoe sis zecent indisposition. His mother, Lady Randall, paid her first visit to * racecourse this year yesterday, and it is ■easy to understand how pleased -she was when Brother BIH got home. Sir Henry Randall bought Brother BUI in tif sale paddock at Newmarket test year for 6SOgSj and he sold him aftsr the taoe lor 699r5." — Orby prefaced his Derby victory by winning the JBbldeyle Plate* one- mile and a-half, i at the BeJdoyle May meeting, and for which he started «t 18 to & on in a feig -field, and covered the distance in -2min 42 4-Ssec Captain W. Scott was represented ia the Baldoyle Plate by the Abeocam filly Hinemoe, but she did no* get a piece. Orby then left for England, protected by * bodyguard of 17 stout Irishmen, which jdoubileae was arranged by wily Mr Oaoker as a slar upon th* character of tine English rather then witih any fear of th* cok nwwAing with foul play. The BngrK&h Jockey Kub started the trouble by refusing to allow Mr Choker's horses to be trained at Mewmaricat; therefore, OrbVs owner has no reason to hold kindly feedings towards his ex-friends in SngJsud. — A special cable to an- Indian paper gives »/»i™> particulars oi she -running -of the English Derby, John- 801 l led at ibe start, bu* after a qumxtez*d m. mile Slieve- Gailion took command, followed lay Bezoniart, Gelvani,\ All Black, and Orby. On oomiqg into the straightr- Orby closed up, passing his field, and took the lead -at the Toend. Wool Winder, wno had "been -tn^Ving np ground last; challenged the leader on nearing home, but Orby maintained his advantage. Tt is already known tfeat Orby was ridden by J. Reiff, but later advices shear that Wool Winder was piloted by ' Madden, and Slieve Gallion by Higgs. The race was robbed of some of its interest by the withdrawal of the French Derby winner, Mordant H, and also of Ouadi Haifa. The letter, however, ran unplaced in the French Derby, and registered a very disappointing performance. — Tin great pace set up by Lionheart oompiHwry aiswryaTiiyd fbe buflt of the field which contested the V.R.C. National Hurdles. The Arwtralasian, in re*errißg io the race, eaid:— -"Wever in &c history of the National has a horse led so far in the first two miles as ltionheert did. At one time he must have been nearly a furlong in front. The only wjty to follow th* race was to watch him jump a hurffie, then turn the glasses on the others un*fl they were over, and pick Inonheart trp again. It was like a hunt, with I/ionheert as the fox and ihe field as hounds. Backers of the fox are to be sympathised with, and so are those the fox beat through bustling them off their lees at the start. There is one thing oeriain—laonheart will get a great rice in the weights for two-mile races." —Up to ihe -end of June the revenue of Victoria had benefited to the extent of over £5000 by the fees imposed on racing clubs under the Gaming Act of last year. Altogether 101 clubs have received licenses, whioh cost £1 each, and the 2 and 3 per cent, charge on the gross taking* of theee clubs Amounts in all to JH99I 6s lOd. the total revenue thus being £5092 4s 10d. There is still a lazge> number of iscing dobs that have not been uosased, *but these are chiefly small country clubs that hold only «ote meeting in a year, and {hey will ttot in marry cases contribute "anything beyond the £1 fee, as their gross revenue does not exceed so that the- .aggregate revenue will probably not be Tery largely inooeoeed. The two h'g metropolitan chiba, the V,R.C. and V.A.T.C., «ontrilnited somewhere about one-half of the total aonount received. — Aft the Salisbury meeting, held an May 81, Hewitt won tiie Salisbury Otrp of 267sovs (one and*a-hatf mifei) on Mr J. Buchanan's Golden Measure, who defeated eight others, including th» Australian-bred Dalkeith. Golden Measure went out second favourite at 9 to 2, and apparently the New Zealander was not allowed to ride his own race, as, contrary to his -usual practice, he was behind his field until a quarter of a mile from home, when he cam* through and won comfortably. On the second day of the Epsom spring meeting Hewitt had another -winning mount by ridine an 8 to 1 chance in ahorse called Shy" L*d to the front at the finieh of a selling race. Shy Lad was owned by Major Edwards, and sold after the race for tlOgs. Hewitt also had a xide in a -race on Derby Day, and the fact of his getting into prominence at such a meeting would no doubt be a splendid advertisement for the former Yaldhurst horseman. — A great race was witnessed for the Novelty Handicap, run at a recent Ascot (Vie.) meeting, when the champion pony Little Jack -came in- for a .great reception after winnmg. The Argus thus describes the race: "The wonderful pony Lottie Jack conceded 28Tb, fin, and a beating to the brilliant mare Mona in the Novelty Handicap. There were no fewer fbtn 84 starters. Man* came with a fine run, and caught Little Jack in- (he last stride, making, a dead heat. The pair met for the deciding 'fee** * ftelT the sixth race. They left the mark exactly level when the flag fell, maaA tmotA to the first turn head and head. Then Mona forged ahead, and led into the «trsight by a clear length. Opposite tiie Leper xaeeiw P. Andrews oafled upon Little Jack, who responded gallantly, and headed Mod* in a couple of strides, eventually winning by • length. As pony and rider returned to the enclosure the spectators cheered again end *g*in, and an extra cheer was given when the owner of Little Jack entered the enclosure and patted her favourjt* bread-winner Affectionately. Such a soene of en&a&iaflm fees seldom been seem on » xaeecouoe." •

— The racing clubs of Victoria receive and disburse every year over £200,000, the whole of which practically goes in prize-money, improvements, and management costs. Under the returns that have been submitted to the <3nief Secretary by the 101 clubs that have obtained licenses for tneir courses, it is shown that their gross revenue last year amotmted to £180467 6s 6Jd. Not one half of -file clubs in the State have yet applied for licenses, and consequently have not had to yet submit their returns. Those, however, that have yet to do so are generally country clubs with a comparatively speaking small revenue, and the aggregate amount to be accounted for will not be very large, though it is certain that the total given is well within the mark. Says a Melbourne paper; — "The figures afford «n interesting illustration of the support that is given to the sport throughout the State. The amount stated represents the total revenue received by the olubs from all sources. The V.R.C. paid a tax cai receipts amounting to over £60,000, so that the leading club probably receives about a fourth of the money paid to racing clubs in the year." — A mounted policeman caused considerable trouble at Hurst Park, England, a few weeks ago. While the Open Plate was being run, Beesborough challenged, and quickly had Carnegie beaten, and the race in hand. In iront 'of the stand, however, a mounted inspector of police suddenly get in the way, with the result that a collision occurred, and -the unfortunate jockey, Templeton, was hurled backward from his horse and lay on the course, an inert and pitiful little figure, whilst Carnegie went on and won. Then followed a scene of pandemonium which beggars description. Instantly crowds surged upon ike course from all quarters, and surrounded tho fallen jockey, whilst mounted police charged the mcb and tried to keep them at bay. The whole course was swarmed over in a moment, and men climbed upon the members' rails in hopes of obtaining a view, some of them even drooping over* into the enclosure, from .which they were instantly ejected. The jockey was carried to the paddock, where he received medical attention, whilst the inspector came in for such a booing and hooting «s is not often heard on a oacecbursfe or anywhere else. The doctor's report on the jockey's condition was fairly favourable, he having escaped serious injury. — India is rather famous for producing farcical steeplechases (says the Asian of June 1), and only last spring -there was a chase at an up-country meeting which had to be declared void owing to none of the competitors being able to get the course. At Quetta last Saturday there was another example of what a steeplechase should not be. In tiie Khalifat Chase there were four starters, two Australians — viz., Mr Rimjn's'gton's Samphire and Mr Harvey-Kelly's lan, and two Arabs, Captain CassePs The -General and Captain Ready's Joey. Our correspondent says: "Samphire got well away, and was soon leading by 30 lengths, which he gradually increased' to more than 50; after jumping the last fence lie could not be persuaded to enter the straight, so was turned round; and galloped round the cricket pavilion, after which be made his way home all right, and notwithstanding his little excursion won by more than a furlong from lan, who fenced well, but was as 'slow as a hearse-horse. The General ran out after jumping the second fence, but was brought back and completed the course somehow; Joey, the second time round, showed that he wasn't taking any,' and waß walked home." — That there is a great element of luck in horse-breeding is demonstrated in the origin of Gaßinule and Pioneer. The Duke of Devonshire, when Earl of Hartington, bought a mare of the late Mr Henry Savile in 1869. She was not of much account on the turf, but her brother. Ryshworth, won some races for Mr Henry Chaplin, and made a bold bid for the Grand National in 1878, when he ran second to Disturbance. The mare was in the possession of Lord Hartington for about 12 years, and she produced among others Moorehen. *no began racing in small selling plateß. She was purchased by Mr T. Green out of on* of these events for 200BOVS, and he parted with her to Mr William Saddler, who ran her in several selling races, winner to be sold for 50eove. The following season she was sold to Mr J. C. Hill, a tenant farmer and breeder, for 50sovs. and he mated her with Vulcan, but she slipped her foal, and Mr Hill decided to hunt her. Finding she cou'd jump, he trained her for events under National Hunt rules. He won several Hunt Caps and hurdle races and steeplechases with her before finally retiring her to the stud. He first mated * her -flritii Highborn, the result being a chestnut colt. O«prey, who was only a moderate plater. Mr Hill had been accepting the views of other people that the cross for Hermit mares was Isonomy, and made up his mind to expend the 7Sgs for the fee, a large amount for a tenant farmer. tsallinule, when his turf days were over. Captain Greer purchased for lOOOgs. After Moorehen had "produced Gallinule, Mr Hill looked about for . another i»ire. and decided on Silvester, but the foal died He then sent Moorhen to Galopin, and tie colt which resulted was known as Pioneer, who stands as the sire of Polar Star, the best three-year-old in England. Pioneer realised lOSOsove as a yearling, and was a good 1 , although unlucky performer.

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2783, 17 July 1907

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2783, 17 July 1907

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