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IN A NUTSHELL.

— "Manjess is in the private sale list. — The Clutha Hack "Racing Club meeting , takes place on if arch 1. — -Ronnie .pulled up very sore on the second day of the Lawrence .meeting. — Solution and Cunieform have been -entered for -the Caulfield Futurity Stakes. — Nominations for the StepnTjk Stakes, of SSOOgovg, close on the 7th of next month. — .Tba Seer burst one of his front feet whilst doing a gallop on Monday morning. — Nominations for the Beaumont Jockey Club's "meeting close on Saturday. March 9. — Nominations for the Central Otago Trotting dub's merting are due on tbe 2?fh inst. — Nominations foi the Rivertcm Racing Club's fixture are due on Wednesday. March 18. — Tile -Melbourne Cut> winner Blue Snec is tto 3jo *to the stud at the conclusion of the present racing season. — IDwo old-lime Winter Cup winners in Spider -and Qsfciak were amongst the unsuccessful runners *t Lawrence. —M^ -J. irooghlrn left 'for Melbourne by this week's boat, and intends ijeing present at the V.X.C. autumn nieetiEg. '

[ —We trotting sire Geo. Iff. Batoben was [ freely -patronised by breeders during the season which has concluded at Gore. — Santa Clans, a peacooky brother to Flarita, shapes promisingly on ,£he track, but has not the best x>f manner* at 'present. 1 — The Victorian Racing Club received 531 nominations on the general entry day for their autumn meeting. Lost year the total was 469. — Secret was spoken of recently ag being favourite for tiie Dxmedin Cup, irtit in "Hie latest quotations she is down at knock-out prices. — "J. Ba umber, -who is "the Archer of the •up-country meetings, rode three winners -and a. dead-heat for first place at the Lawrenoe meeting. —.Radium *nd Gaveola both displayed attractive torm^when they -won last -week, send should score again when the company is not too strong. — Dotting the past few days there has been a strong desire on the part of backers to support Cross Battery and Golden Cairn for the Cup and Publicans'. — Cuniefonn and Captain Shannon are ~both doing goad work in Victoria, but "Mensohikoff lias been showing lameness, and is being treated to swimming. —It is said that a couple of Indian sportsjnen intend -visiting Kew Zealand in search of a likely horse or two suitable for racing in the land -of rajahs. — The two flydney colts, •Poseidon -and An- | tonious, have "been priced by an Indian buyer. ) Poseidon is not for sale, amd the figure -asked for Antonioua, JUOO, is considered too high. —If Star itoee is fit a<nd well and .goes to the poet for ihe Wangaarui Cup, iis form at tiie 'last New .Zealand Cup meeting suggests .that he will be very hard to beat. — !Dhe Allarrdale Stock J?arm intend holding a sale on the up-to-date American principle by which horeee axe sent against the watch with their prospective buyers looking on at the trial. — Commenting on the jockeyship displayed on the flat last season, the London Sportsman says:— "The Tiding in Great Britain of the present day is much inferior to what it was 25 years ago." — Whatever Bosebloom may accomplish this week will not set a correct mark on her form, as she has been idle for several days owing to showing signs of lameness in one of her hind legs. — Solution was fancied for the St. 3-eorge Stakes, decided -at Caulfield on Saturday last, but, per favour of Mr A. Moss, who oabled for information -about the Tace, it ie learnt that the mare did -not start. — Poseidon was withdrawn 'from the Australian Cup on the advice of his trainer, who holds the opinion "boat it would be a severe tax on the cott to race him over two miles and la-quarter with 9.1 on his back. — Diana, the two-year-old 'filly by the exAucklander Uniform — Queen of the Chase, owned by Mr A. W. Bailey, won the Breedera' Plate of £1200 at the Johannesburg Turf Club' 8 summer meeting on December 26. — The Tahuna Park Trotting Club will commence their autumn meeting on Friday, and their patrons will probably b© -able to witness some good sport, as fairly large fields are engaged in each race on the day's card. — Hemlock ran badly at Lawrence, but his 1-oor display of form was partly owing to the fact -that he could not act round the turns. He was well placed in a coupLe of raceß, and lost his position through the cause mentioned. — There is a deal of money to be won with jumpers in Prance. Last month at Nice £18.000 was given for 40 prizes (steeplechases and hurdle races) to be run within 10 days. There was a handicap steeplechase with £4000 added. — The fall which Last Ensign and Skookum received when running in the Maaden Plate at Lawrence was caused by the latter horse .galloping on to Lady Casket, with the result that he came down, and Last Ensign fell over him. —i The highest price ever paid for a yearling in Australia was 2300g5. This price waa given for the Primrose colt (Lord Randolph) at a St. Albans sale. Joan was sold in Sydney last autumn for 2000gs. This is the best price in Australia for a filly. A. Wilson and A. il'lvor, the Tiders of Last Ensign and Skookum m the Maiden Plate at Lawrence, joined the halt and lame brigade as a result of the fall which was received m that race. M'lvor was unable to ride «!t the rest of the meeting. — Lady Mostyn (the dam of Lady "Wallace) ha 3 a filly foal at foot, the Eire of which is San Francisco. In the hope of Lady Mostyn throwing another Lady "Wallace, Mr M'Donald last season sent her on a visit to Wallace, and she is believed to be in foal to the Carbine horse. — Battler, the son of Beadonwell and Bntorrarte, who at one time carried Mx S. Solomon's colours, scored twice at Lawrence, and ran out both races in good honest style, as on both occasions he had to be hurrted along in order to catch the judges' eye as a v. inner. — It is stated that the Hon. H. J. Saunders, of Perth, intends going in for horse-breeding on a fairly large scale at his place, HenTey Park. He has three sires -to begin with — Henley, by Malua, Pakaka by Hotchkiss, and Piata by Castor. The two last were Died an Auckland. Grenadier, the Xew Zealand -bred Hon of ?onlt and Hotcherina, wiih 9.11 on his back, was sent out at a 5 to 4 on chance in afield of 10 which r«n in a Trial Plate at a recent Sandown Park meeting, and won comfortably. He is engaged in the Newmarket Handicap, but was lame after -the race mentioned above. — The Australian Jockey Cub has granted H Oxenbam a license to bet at Randwiok, so it ib probable that the well-known fielder -will again be found operating on the course Mr Oxenham gave up hi« "license when the AJ C. decided that no bookmaker who did town business would ba allowed to bet on lh« course — The Tuapeka County Jockey Club expended close on £1000 in making its new course at Lawrence. The track is a distinct improvement on the one which it has deserted. «nd under the new conditions cue club will probably -receive more patronage from owners than has been the caae for several years past. — Che're Ami. who won the A.J.C Doncaster Handicap. 1904, is hke'y to be seen under silk in England this The Fucilo geldrng. who belong 3to R Wootton. has been racing with a fan- measure cf success in South Africa, whence he will be taken to the Old Country by his owner, who has been on a short visit to the laud of t>he Boer. — The riding tactics displayed at Lawrence last week were occis:ona'!y, b'lt rare y. good, more frequently very bad, and at other? brazenly impudent. The writer has at tiroes drawn pointed attention to the riding at various meetings. but some of our stewards have either vaiy little krowledge of racing, or else they have very little " backbone " — Lady Casket, a hgiitfy-buiit daughter of Casket and Motto <the daughter of Medallion and Marion), was badly cut when galloped on fcv Skookum in her race at L,?wrer---e !n«t week She wfts iu'l of toi>nmjr it the time, and the accident <wa» doubly unfoi lunate, as jt not only kil.td her tliance

of success in one race, but also prevented "her from running at the rest of the meeting. — The conditions of £he Kewmarket (England) sales include clauses that "bids must be made in not less than guineas up io 20gs, Sgs up to 200g8, lOgs up to lOOCIgs, 60gs up to 2000gs, and lOOgs thereafter. All disputes arising must be decided by Tattersall's, whose | commission is Is in the £, whether the horae is -sold by public auction or by private contract during the weeks of sale or prior •advertisement. — Ihe formation, of a trotting club is contemplated by some Wyndham sports, but perhaps these gentlemen -would be working in ' , the best interests of the sport if they abani dened the idea. There are trotting clubs I e,t Gore and Wirrton, and, in addition, the racing clubs cater fairly well for the trotters, j \ There is .already too much racing, and a : further .addition to the list is by no means | desirable. I — According to the compiler of the Australasian Turf Register, the -winning sires' list for the -first .half of the season is headed by Positano, with 22 races, of the value of £15,152; while Orafton follows with 72 r-aces, but worth only £12,811. Other prize-winnera include: — Simmer, £4652; Souli CNew Zealand), £4489; Lochiel, £4434; "Wallaoe, 3305; Maltster. -£28G8.; Medallion, £26e5; Haut Brion £2499; Madvob'o, £2355; True Blue, £2245 ; and Orzil, £2136. — The Stepniak — Ambush filly Beresina has I proved a bargain at the price for her by Messrs - Price and Nettlefold, when they paid 3ome- . thing one and two centuries to Mb: G. G. Staad. Since *he -raas taken 'across to Australia with Machine Gun she has become : [ badly affected in the respiratory organs, but j I that she can go fast is evidenced by .her win, i on Saturday last, when he won the Oakleigh I Plate in a field of 19. There is a yearling brother to Beresroa in D. J. Price's stable. — The Sydney Mail states that Metropolitan, racing secretaries have good reason to bless the birth of Mr W*de's Gambling Bill, for it , i ie a notable iact that every week the attendances at suburban race meetings are improv- j ing. In the days of "open play" the gambling proclivities of armies of -half-hearted -sportsmen could be satisfied in the city betting ' shops, where ithey could hack their fancy, or the tip of come friend, without being troubled to travel to the scene of operations or the expense of paying at the turnstiles. — The ''Special Commissioner" of the London Sportsman writes : — "It is often contended that ti areas are imitative animals, ' and if you exercise your young stock with known stayers they will develop the action of stayers, and that is the essential point, provided the vital forces axe otherwise sum- | oient. Matthew Dawson more then once told : me that *Lord John fkott used to exercise ■ .greyhounds in the paddocke where his year- ' Imgs were turned out in order -to give the , embryo racehorses an early object lesson in the 'best style of action." — A valuable trotting stallion, known as Tallis 8., and a blood mare by Trinculo ' were recently killed by lightning in Australia. The horeea were -standing in the shade of a tree, the afternoon "being sultry. A flash of lightning woe Been, and the horse® fell dead. The lightning had -struck Tallis B. on the head, travelled along his neck, and down his fore and hind legs. The mare had been struck «>n her withers, and the ' lightning travelled down her forelegs only. 1 The hair of -the horses was singed, and a j post mortem examination showed that the j ilesh had been badly burnt. — English files furnish a table of the .winning sires of two-year-olds for the past eeaeon, and show that of those whose progeny "ha^se won over lOOOgs Ayrshire heads the list, with . seven winners of 12 races, amounting to ! 10,257g«; Floriael II sired four winners, who ' won eight races, totalling 67501g5 ; wMWPioneer (sue of Polar Star) got four wiSners, ! whose 15 races amounted to -64-70gs. La,vemo was represented by two winners for six events, for a total of 6377Jg5; and Orme followed,' with seven winners for 15 raceg, valued at T>3l7gs ; and sixth on the list comes Gallinule, who sired three winners for five events, for a total of 5051g3. — One of the leading owners in the South ' Island has a strong penchant for ladling out lengthy instructions to those who are about to ride his horse 1 ;. On one occasion he excelled himself in this respect, and. after ccaching the rider how to successfully grapple with every possible thing like'y to cccur in the race, he asked the horseman if he had been listening. The rider replied in the affirmative, but when asked if he knew what had been said, somewhat astonished the owner by candidly admitting that he did -not know. Since then the owner has considerably condensed the instructions i he gives his jockeye. ■ — A writer in the Melbourne I/eader ba.s been discoursing about old-time fielders, and mentions that Joe Thompson paid -the stable £40.000 when Chester won the Cup and Derby. The owner of Suvanaka. stood to win £37.000 over the Cup in which that horse was , defeated by Cheater, Waxy was backed to win £67.000, First Water was backed to wm £100,000 when Martini-Henri beat him ; and two of tbe latest big- things in the way of betting was the -£20,000 which Mr D. S. Wallace •vron over Mentor and the £33.000 I which N«da should -have taken out yf the I ring had Bhe won the Cup for the late t Mr W. ~R. Wilson. By comparison, the £10,000 which was landed over the last Xew Zealand Cup is very small fish. — The splendid results which attended the Xorth Otago Jockey Club's efforts to alter for owners of two-year-olds has naturally induced thai body to retain tho juvenile events on its programme, and -next spring tho Stepniak Stakes, of 200sovs. will come up for decision for the second time. Colts will bp required to carry 80. geldmgs 7.11, and nllies 7.9 Thp subscription is to be Ssovb each, unless forfeits «re declared and paid as follow* — 'viz.. lsov if struck out by Friday, August 2, 1907, >r 2sovs if struck out by general entry day, to be named later. Ail horses remaining in after geneTal entry muat pay the subscription )f osovq on acceptance day, to be named shortly before the Trace. Xo money is Teqiirrpd on nomination day, which is fixed for Thursday, .March 7 I — A movement is on foot ,to establish a Victorian league of sportsmen, with the fol'owing objects- — (1) To protest actively and effectively against the arbitrary interference by the State Legislature with the liberty of the subject ; (2) to insist, through the ballot box upon the repeal or entire amendment of + .he unfair and inequitable clauses of the Lincensing Act and Gaming Act as parsed by the State Parliament, in bo far as they violate the principles of British liberty and the spirit of fair dealing; (3) to secure, by like moans, the return of members to the next Parliament specifically pledged to carry cut the sbjecrts mentioned in clause 2. and to actively Bj»sist in displacing those members of Pai-'ia-rnent whose interference, as aforesaid, ha? forfeited ihe trust and confidence of tbe community —In «neakin<r of the operations of the* Gamine Act in Victoria, the Australasian say « _"Thn A"t dops not sloj b?U'n« T.he bookmaker- can «end ol't the prices th°y are ttil'ms t'i '<»»• nnd with tilip newspa,pfi = barred frr>m nial •> the odd? übhc lwckfn hsvc no motecticu v.hp.'e\er. The object of Messrs

Bent and, Judkins in insisting on fibis secrecy 1 was, of course, to lessen betting; but suppos- I ing that the business is slightly decreased, ■ the gain in that way will not counterbalance ' the injustice done to those who will bet by giving the bookmaker the advantage of fixing ! his own prices. Be cannot do this when publicity is given in the papers to what is going on. Already a borse is at a very short price for the Newmarket Handicap, but the Gaming Act forbids us to tell our readers the name of that horse." — The death of the .Mstrchkmess of Hast-, ings (oabled this week) recalls recollections cf the Hastings-Chaplin quarrel in the sixties. Lady Florence Paget «a« engaged to Mr £L Chaplin. She threw him over for the Maxqnis of H acting b. T»hen -Mr .Chaplin went in for racing on a large ccgle, «nd he* and the Marquis opposed each other -with the .greatest | bitterness. When Mr Chaplin won the Derby | of 1867 .with ,the outsider Hermit, the Marquis is said to have lost £100,000. He won £50,000 on Lecturer in the Cesarewiteh, but was hopelessly involved at the end of the year, and ie supposed to have been ia the hands of Padwick, the moneylender, when The Eai-1 was scratched for the Derby of 1868. The Marquia died when, he was 26 years old, and hoB widow mania d Sir George Chetwynd, another unfortunate racing man. — The Ascot Gold Cup this year obtained the splendid entry of 50, but in five instances advantage has been -taken of the old-fashioned . light to ".seal" nominations. Derby winners ( ' in Spearmint, Hammnrabi, and Morpeth II < -are to be given the opportunity to distinguish themselves in the race .par .excellence of the turf, and the names of Barieeooeui and Storm, ! the runners-up to Spearmint in the Grand | Prix de Paris, are also to be iound in the | list. The French crack Mamtenxm, with 11 -ciotories to has -credit -(including bhe French Darby) last year, is also noananaled, and olaBS is -represented by Keystone 11, "Celootty, Folymelus, Hammeikop, Sagamore, Pobir Star, Black Arrow, and Troutbeck. It will - thus be gathered that the contest on the Royal Heath next June is likely to prove | one of the -most exciting in the iistory of , the Gold Cup. — The English jookey C. Txigg recently won iivp looes .in succession at a meeting held at Worcester, This remarkably fine feat calls to mind the parallel case in Edinburgh in 1902 (says the London Sportsman), when, curiously enough, the same jockey was thE , "star" performer. Then Trigg — on October 3, 10Q2 — rode the first five winners off the reel — (^neen of tbe Gipsies (11 to A), Reginald (5 | to 4 on), Kirkbride (5 to 4 on), St. Hubert (7 to •»). and Dewdrop (7 to 2). Judged by th» betting returns, which may be e-aid io I reflect *he xman:es t>f the candidates, his .kt*e j performance waß even better, tihe successful I horses on -which he had mounts starting .-at i the following prices: — Precentor (11 to 8 on), Soribo (5 to 1), Cherry Well (100 to 80), Bemindful (8 to 1), and Dunreary (7 to 2 on). When Trigg scored in such irresistible fashion at Edinburgh in 1902 racing was also going on at "Newmarket. .—. — Tlhe catalogue in connection, with, the sale of the Ranch trotting -stud, Glenroy, to be offered -at the City M-oree B*zaax, by Messrs Campbell and Sans, of Melbourne, on March 6, is to hand. Tshe catalogue, which \ ! is very well got up, shows that there are ! 55 lots to be offered, as -p/eLI as waggons, I "harness, etc. It is stated in the introduction 1 to the catalogue *hat "the imported fliies | j and brood mares were especially selected by I Mr Veils in *he United States, none of j [ v/hich has proved disappointing, *nd they J | are all true-gaited trottets, excepting 'Coney Island, ■who is a pacer, but tloes not require hobbles. We have -deemed at advisable in the I I beginning of this catalogue to make special ; reference to Hambletoniaai (10), Electioneer •; . (125)— his greatest .speed-producing .son— and v General Ben ton (1755), as the strong blood ' lines of these •world-femed trotting hoisea predominate m the blood of 'The Ranch 1 stock." —At a committee meeting of the Southland Racing Club, held on Friday evening, Mr James's offer to work the totalisator at the approaching autumn meeting was accep- ' ted It was decided to defer consideration ' of the metropolitan body's decision in the Kennedy-Bluestone caae until & special meeting of the committee, to be held on 6th March. Privileges for the autumn meeting are to be let by tender, to close on Hi© 6i,h prox., the highest or any tender not recessarily to be accepted. It was decided to plaoe a buah hurdle double m front of j the stand, and a similar fence at the top j turn Unto tho straight icxr the steeple- j chases, -the other fences to remain as they are. Tt was also decided to give the owner of the adjoining land on the southern boundary notice under the Fencing Act that the club intends to erect c new fence. Accounts and salaries amounting "to £27 14s Bdt wore passed for payment. .Messrs James Ritchie and John Latham were nominated as delegates to the N.Z. Racing Conference from the Southland clubs. — "As each year comes to its close I endeavour to force upon my readers the Absolute certain success of betting on a system, provided one has sufficient strength of mind to keep .determinedly to the rules and turn a deaf -ear to all outside influence. A few I know iollow our ayrtem and win, but the majority. I fear" (says the "Special Commissioner" of the London Sportsman), "get a certain distance and then, to Bpeak vulgarly. r 'funk,' and throw up the sponge just when success ia at their door. The system, however, is simple, and really requires euch a small bank that it is a wonder it is not more widely followed. It is this: Pick out any number of the best horses in training and follow them until they win, doubling your etake. say, 1, 2, i, 16, and if they do not win in five attempts, it will be because bad luck has occasioned it, or bad judgment was exerciped in selecting them I have worked it cut for many years, and find it invariably comes out right. The best plan is, I think, to ohoose the tvo or three best out of each Btable, because each stable contrives to win a race or two with its best horse or .horses." — Some of the Christchurch trainere who ere at Wingatui with teams of horses ex- . penenced a good deal of trouble and bother in getting south Transport accommodation was difficult to procure, horses in the same stable had to travel by different trains. Others had to be brought down some days before it was absolutely necessary, and when >t ib remembered that several trainers have horses in active commission which are not engaged at ouz meeting, tbe inconvenience of a. lengthy ataence is no small item. I Owing to the impossibility of getting by train, it was intended to bring Cross "Battery, Sea King, and Wild Cat by boat, but their I tiainers took -advantage of a special which came down from Christchurch on Saturday night, and reached heu?- early on Sunday i morning. The horaes ware stabled in town ' on the day and night of -heir arnva.l, and pinppad to Wingsttui on Monday morning, j Having to go through this broken method of j shipping valuable borees docs not tend to i make our course popular with trainers, and in future it would lie advisable for the club to endeavour to make some arrangements v.-ith the railway authorities -which would ffcuirat* the transport of homes. > — Racing is a much-abused aport, but if -all oiders of society looked as well after one an.-"

f other as those connected with racing <8». wfc I should hear little or ndtbins of destitution. 1 Who, for example (says an English paper) is ' destitute at Newmarket? Practically no one. And when does anyone who has played tb«( | game lairly fall on evil days -without finding plenty of friends to stand by lim? Even ih4 much maligned bookmakers are among tbd first and best subscribers to any deserving case. It is the same with other sports. Takey for instance, hunting. "The Hunt ServwnrtaP Benefit Society provides a weekly allowancei in cases of illness or accident, an annuity* .after the age of 60 or 63, and there is 'also! .provision made for -widows and orphans. It! has recently been suggested that the annuity^ should commence at the age of 50 or 55, and* the president of the society, the Marquis ofl Zetland, has appealed to 'hunting men ta ■subscribe -file necesary funds. This they aiw sure to do, -for it means not -mare than aboutf £30 for each Hunt in the kingdom, and therec are also many other contributory sources, as the sale of the excellent Tittle pocket-book,, etc., " Fox-hunters' Vade 'Mecum," -which waS oompiled -by Mr -Richard Grd. Already oveti £55 has been derived irom this source alone. — Commenting on C. B. 3?ry's famous lee-* ture on ""What is a Sportsman?" the London/ Sporting Life publishes the following:— "26 greater travesty upon character-reading thanf Mr Harold Begbiels reflections on the auto 4 biography of Mr R. S. Sievier was suxerji sever permed. By taking- sentences from the£ book written by Mr Sievier., and putting wrong£ constructions upon them, Mr B^gbie comes to^ the conclusion that Mr Sievier is not jj. eports-f man. It must be noted that Mr Begbie set* out to answer the question, 'What is a sporta-i' man?' and this is the method he employs.. He quotes Mr Sievier : 'If I -were asked which 1 I would .soon-er be, an angel or a devil fromf the accepted standpoint as understood on this earth, I would at once declare myself a devil,, for I should then at least escape -that grewteati of all insidious evils in .man — hypocrisy.' *Da you not perceive from it,' exclaims Mr Begbie,'that our author is unable to conceive of virtfue\* &Bd purity, .self-sacrifice, and honour, conxpaftx »ion, and adoration of God without the eleß. ment of hypocrisy? "What is his opinion off Socrate9 — a hypocrite ; of the .good Loxcf Sluftosbury ? — a hypocrite; of St. Framoia?— v a hypocrite! . . . In our gentleman!* eyes^ Robespierre was a honest devil, And Nero turn' Charles Peace . . . jolly good devils, everji one.' " — There is <a lot of money to be wan racing; for those who are lucky enough to win i»J Last season — we must not forget that we .are}, in another year — well over half a million waar distributed, though the precise amount h*fl(| not been arrived at, as the £540,803 lfia itf both over and under the mark. This stated 1 , total is incorrect for the reason that in the/ case of a deadiheat each .horse is cneditaw' with the full stake of which he received half., Thus Stillingfleet and Skiograph dead-he*tedf for £357, and each is set down as havng wt>n( that sum instead of £78 10s. This, however^, does not add up to very much, and on th£| other hand the total .quoted idoes not incJudeg the often large amounts for .second *nd thirdT horses. The money is, of aeur.ee, not verj| equally distributed, the first eight ovmerrfj having £123,495 of it between thesd and it is perhaps rather odd thai! whereas Lord Derby, who heads that list here, has won £32,925 in stakes^ Mr J. B. Eeene, who heads the list in Imet Tioa, has won not far short of the same total? £31,102. Jlr Keen, known on this eide as thtt owner of Foxhall and other horses, has runf an exceptional number of seconds, one writer^ calculating that "if" these seconds had beenf fiesta they would have come to *nother( £26.000 — only they weren't, and so they didn't* "If' — another of them — Sysonby had stood! there is no saying what Mr Scene might noi( have won, I suppose (say* an English writer); ior the son of Melton w*» declared to be isbei best animal ever known! There have, how-* evter, been so mary of these bests about thaif it is hard to choose between them, and much/ harder to accept any one. — Mr S. O. Wood, the well-known Victorian, veterinary surgeon, when in Great Britain lasb' year, made inquiries on behalf of the Victorianf Government with a view to the purchase of! some Welsh pony or other stallions for the State. He has now made the following suggestions: — -"(I) That the Governmenit purehasxj, a -number of short-legged, thick-set, thoroughbred 3tallions, from 15 to 15.2 hands high, of the type shipped to India, theiT racing performances being taken into consideration onlyj as far as they convey a guarantee of constitutional soundness. They should be distributed) throughout the State for service of half-bred} mares only, and made available at a small fee to farmers and others. The merits oi this plan are at least twofold. It would prevent the loss to the State of a very desirable type* of stallions, and would encourage the produce tion of a greater number of horßes suitable* for export or general utility purposes. (2)j That premium* be offered annually fox stallions suitable for improving the breed ofl horses, the condition being that the winners shall stand in districts to be allotted at V reasonable fee. to be fixed by the Government^ and to be available for service of at least 30 halfbred mares annually at such fee. Thi«( would encourage the private ownership of atallionß of a standard approximating to that oA the Government-awned stallions. (3) That all stallions be licensed, subject to approval ofl a qualified board, and no unlicensed stallioni be allowed to stand ior public service for fees., (4) That the Government give earnest conai-< deration to the great need for discouraging the exportation of mares. This might in part* be accomplished by reserving the option of! purchasing from each shipment collected ior export such mares as it is desired to retain. at a fair market price, with the object (A selling them to breeders on terms of two^ three, or four annual payments." — Writing of the two-year-olds in EnglaaKT, "Vigilant," in the London Sportsman. .«ays: — "It will, I think, be generally allowed that thef two-year-olds of the season wthich is now ended! promise better than any which we have eeera for at least two years — or rather, I should! say, that these are more good-class ones than usual, and it seems likely that in Polar Star, at all events, we may have found anothefl horae of the century. These are strange vicissitudes in breeding, and whereas in Cicero'a year M. Edmund Blanc had at least th*ea colts good enough to "win our Derby, he has not this year one with the remotest chance* of winning it. His best colt appears to bet Ouodi Haifa, but those who .have seen thei eon of Persimmon run declare that he does not stay. On the other band, however, Sagamore and My Pet II have not to be reckoned) I with in connection with our classic races, an« I as Polar Star w«s not entered, the Derby will | not -take co much winning -as on first tjhoughto would appear likely. Can Slieve Gallion atajj the distance and will Gra-lvami be at his beslJ I on the day? Some still cling to the ideal that Traquair will win, and it may "be ihaM . his wind infirmity, such as it is, will jaofc stow him any more thin it would thave .stopped hfrr maternal grandaire, Goldfinch. Jfot .» few winners of even the St. JiMget dune .been ott-h sound in the >wind. Gurtairce ,4eU« ns'.flMtrf! Lord liyon mad» a otiebt JioHe, and Jabai Porter 'told Jaw .the «urn erf TJkrostl*, Aoitly, after <*he had won. DornrMtn *wa* .under ow •picion for the s«m» treason beiow laiß I»e^er atty, -and ©rmonde «aus also 'touched' befoMT hi»'Dono»at«r victory. There are cases, Tiow-

9m*.when a. colt has won one or more of. the glassies and has then failed owing to his »md going wrong. Bothwell was one of these. Be beat Sterling for the Two Thousand Guineas, but afterwards became a roarer, and almost useless. Similarly, Pretender was a roarer when he made such a poor show for the St. Leger. As for the coming two-year-olds, I need only say-here that there are rumours of early discovered excellence in several, and .•specially in one or two by Persimmon, which have done something quite extraordinary."

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2762, 20 February 1907

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2762, 20 February 1907

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