Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

IN A NUTSHELL.

— Acceptances for the Lake County meeting close on December 13. — GTenculloch hes incurred a 141b penalty far the D.J.C. Champagne Stakes. — Nominations for the- Southland Racing: Club meeting close on December IT. — Nominations close on December 15 for th» Palmerston Trotting Club's meeting — Mai'seillaiae, who was amongst the win» ners at Woodville, is » sister to Lord: Souli. — Nominations for the Wyndham Jockey, Club's annual meeting, close on- December 15. — The : Multiform gelding Highland Fling has joined (J. Lenny's string at Flemingten. — Nominations close on Monday, !J&ecem<bsr 17, for the Southland Racing Club'a meet-

ing. ' — Crichton h*s been blistered, and is not likely- to be raced until the back end of the sec>3on.

— Tlie- newly-formed Peninsula Trotting Club intend to hold a meeting on. the 29th of December.

— Nomintutions in connection with the Cromwell Jockey Club's annual meeting close on December 13. , — A complimentary tioketr is to hand from^the Vincent Jockey Club's meeting, and is acknowledged with thanks. # — Owners are reminded tnat nominations for the Waikouaiti Racing Club'a meeting close on December 12. — Latest advices from Auckland report that Apologue is a firm favourite for the Cup, and is quoted at 4-'s "to 1. — Tho Melbourne Cup winner, Revenue, is working with Mr Macdon«ld'a horses again. Revenue is 10 years- old. Sir George Clifford's team, consisting of Clanchattan, Golden Cairn, and Glenculloch, have arrived in Auckland. — Mr Nelligan has placed Tessera, Harvest, and King's Guest in T. Cotton's stable, to be. trained for future- engagements. — Afcthe Toamaki J.C. meeting last week it was-re*olved- not to receive- any investments by wire at the Christmas meeting. — The one-time Yaldhurst rider, F. DJones, has arrived Rt CEristchurch, and intends remaining here for some* time. — The Stepni«k— Madder filly, which mad« top price of sSsgs at the* last Eldeislie yearling sales, has. been named Ukraine. — 'J?he motion submitted to the Victorian State Parliament for the legislation of tB» toto-lisator was thrown out by 22. to 7. — Mlessra- Wirth Bros , of circus fame, won th» bight-jumping contest *t th» Goj» show with •■ piebald pony, w&o clowned sft 6§in. — Prior to the. declaration of acceptancea for .he Auckland Cup Cambrian waa solidly supported for the big zace. at Bllexslie. — Nominations for certain events at_ th« Cromwell races will close- on the 13th inst-, a«d for the other events on the- 25th. inst. —J. Gainaford, who whs associated with Waiiiki when the handsome son of Soul* was one- of our crack racers, intends returning to New South W*les. . , — A Melbourne paper reports that Carbine a old jockey, R. Raraege-, who has been- sadly out of luck for several years past, has left Melbourne for West Australia. — After the- forfeits, which fell due las* week, 22 remain in the C.J.C. Middle Poilc Plate, 88 in the Challenge Stakes, and 29 in the C.J.C. Champagne Stakes. —J. Rutledge has a team of eight gome at present, and all doing useful work. Vladimir is worked on the lead, ana OMy 09 seen out at our Christmas meeting.

— Australian exchanges announce the death of Mr Charles Baldwin, tlie owner of Durham Court stud, one of the best-known breeding establishments in the Commonwealth. «. — Owners vre reminded' that nominations close on December 21 for the Tiial Stakes and Farewell Handicap to be -decided at the Dunedin Jockey TJlnb's summer meeting. — The Jfenschikoff youngster G*pon, who is in -woTk aX Caulfield, has been added to the liEt. Gapon has displayed plenty of pace in private, but has declined to race up to bis track form. —It is somewhat' surprising to find the names ©i 'both Armistice .and Gladstone included in the list of acceptors for the Auckland Cup after they -were "bath reported to be- -seriously amiss. ' — The Maxim— Flattery liorse Musketry was awarded first prize ir. the :«horoughbred stailion class at the Auckland show. Musketry was sold under the hammer in Dunedin some few years ago at 32gs. — The crack English mare Pretty Polly has finished racing, and "will go to the stud next ye*r. Her ~6xs*. -mate will be Laveno. The Ascot Cap -winner, Bachelor's Button, also goes io the atud next year. —Mr G. Payne, of Cbristehurch, purchasca Submarine during the currency of the Woody vJle meeting, and -the- *on -of Torpedo—Bluefire ran in that gentleman's interests on the second day of the gathering. -i- If «ufficient inducement offers, tbe -NT-ew South Wales Trotting -Club intend instituting a Sixes' Produce Stt&es, to be decided in 1910. The trace is to be for doajb of 1907, and subscriptions close -on December 17. — The •Flemington trainer, R. H. Frew, wio paid a. visit to tbjs -country on previous occaeionß, and picked up a horse or two, has «gain eailed -from. 'Australia with tbe intention of paying this part oi tbe -world another call- — The Lake jCounty Jockey Club's annual meeting will b*e "held on Friday and 'Saturday of this -week, and, judging by the entries, the gathering promises to be the most successful -held in tbe district for several years ptst. — Lancaster, the three-quarter brother to Trenton and Co." had a winner a£ -the iEJpeom (Vie.) meeting, which ~w» held on November 24, -when Molong, a four-year-old, by iJje eon of 'Fraiity, defeated 11 others in a six-furlong -welter. - — A**JT»g on tbe advice of ihe starter, the committee of tbe Queensland Turf Club decided .at * recent meeting to refuse the n-omi-siation in future oi the Song Olaf gelding Kinbombi, because -of bis- displays at the starting post. — The Waikam Hack Hacing Clnb -will hold their annual race meeting on Tuesday. December, 18, when -six events -will be d«c!3ed. A'copy of the .programme and a complimentary/ ticket foi 'the -meeting is acknowledged -with 1 banks. — Those who intend 1 patronising ihe Lake •County Jockey Club's meeting are reminded that the -general entries close on Thursday, December 13. Acceptances for tbe Jockey Club and Flying Handicaps -and Queensicwn Trot -fall due ion -ike same daie. — Amongst >the winners art Bebnont Park, which is one of tfce tszdmrbfta bracks -in" West . Australia, mm* Spinder. * rtbree-year-old son ,' of fitepniak *nd -.Cobweb. J3pinder is engaged in 4his year's West Australian Derby. •, — T&e many friends scad acquaintances of ihe H-Qn. George Jf 'Lean, the .popular president of tbe Dunedin Jockey Club, -will regret to jhear thai he is -*p"dr"ig but slow.p rogress towards recovery rfrojn -the illness which has confined hiraio his .bed for nevend-dayp cast. — L. H. Hewitt, ,-who <will remain in 'Sydney until after the New Tear, roSe Atbol kelson, ihe winner of tbe Farm Stakes at Warwick Farm, and subsequently lie finished fhiid. on the same horse, in the Pace Welter, carrying 9.4, heads only separating the placed hotaes. — The Stepniak filly Cross Battery has been purchased by the gentleman who races under the name of '^Mr J. jGasef' and is to join A. Pringle's stable. Idasa was purchased by the same gentleman, and is probably the first igalloper fringle has ever Jiad under bis cbaxfce. — Tbe Hon. G. Miiean's colt Amethyst, a gwod-lcoking son of Lord JSowlyn «nd Tourmaline, -has been thrown out of training. It appears -he slightly injured himself when a yearling, and although he Las shown some fairish gallops, it has been decided not to ' persevere rwith him. — Since declining an offer of 12OQgs for Poseidon's young brother, the Mssers Moses Bros, have refused .a second of 1500gs. They stated that the .yearling -would go up for Ea!e at Handwick in the autumn. The Messrs Moses Bros, paid 400gs for Jacinth with Poseidon running at her side. — The Tahuna Park Trotting Clnb made a profit of £$0 over their spring meeting. In connection -with this year's" spring meeting tbe club incurred «n extra expenditure of > £350 above that of last year, and also lost the benefit Accruing from ihe sale of booth privileges, which realised^JSSO last spring. —J. Lowe, ->who trained Solution foe her Australian engagements, is at present on a -visit to hiß -relations in Dunedin. After a brief .holiday he intends setting up as a public trainer at Trentham, and such a. successful snd careful man with horses should soon have- his services in big reqneet. — An .English Tpaper states thai, despite - lo«g waUs»?*nd .exercise at .golf, Kempton Cannon continue* to., put on bo/ much weight that he contempl&ies returning his flat-r«CB licence at jao distant date. 'There is a probability, if be can get suitable mounts, of him being seen over hurdles during the forthcoming season. — The Hon. Geo. M'Lean's team in active commission consists of seven horses, of which Apollodoris a.nd Notus are tbe brightest stai-e. Both these horses are looking bright and healthy, and tbe former appears to have crown up a bit since the spting. Afer, Hamattan, Erskine. Olivine, and Sonia are the others in the stable. — The almost continuous epall of dry •weather which has been experienced locally has made the grass tracks at Wingttui somewhat hard, and a good fall of rain would be much appreciated at our racing headquartets. The plough gallop, however, is in splendid order, and at present standing in high favour with trainers. — Ram*, winner of the Johannesburg Hax"clicap, valne of SOOOsovs, a few weekß tgo, is the property of Mr P. Wootton. who. after «, short stay in South Africa, will return to England time for the opening of tbe racing season, taking Rama and several other horses with him- Rama, is iralf-sister of the Derby winner, Spearmint, and therefore valuable as a brood mr.re. — — The rmce for the Gold Cup at Egham in 1806 produced an unusual spectacle. The jockeys of ihe five starters had been instructed "not to make pl»y," and by way of fulfilling their orders they walked the first mile of the four, -"after which commenced severe running, the first four running head and bead, add conthrard co until within a few lengths of -ths -ending post." — According 4o the Australasian the Colman v. Killer action has rssuUed in a nivmbe* of new men being licensed by ihe V.B.C. When the present lee mz» Arrived at, after a conference, it irae understood that no more bookmakers would be licensed; but the committee evidently think the action of Col man and his supporters absolves them from adhering to that implied promise. e-At the. Dpncftster September sales it

I blood stock Mr H.T?. Smith, of Gordon Brook stud, N.S.W., purchased a yearling colt by Revenue (son of Blairfinde) from Pet, the dam of Delaunay, for lloOgs. The colt has been leased to ~2sajor Herbert for his two and. three .years' racing career, -after which he will be forwarded to Gordon Brook to take up stud duty. — Many persons will remember the Tngomar horse Alcinous, ■who raced here in the late eighties. His nume cropped up as the sirs of a -winner at the last Bendigo meeting, when a daughter x>f his, -named Lady Cnxzon. scored in -ft welter. Later in the -day Lady Curzon also ran second in a six-furlong race to Katanga, a three-year-old filly by Hotchkiss — Crescent, and consequently a sister to Starshoot. — Golden Eagle's win at Feilding apparently meant -a swoop down on the s-.p. 'merchants' banking accounts, as, according to report, the filly was liberally supported in several towns. The St. Clements filly, who was making .her 'first appearance under silk, had evidently displayed something out of the •ordinary in private. Her dam, Beu Ban, was fit by Gipsy King out of the Musket mare orori, who threw Irish Twist and Uuby Twist. — The Australian natives handle a boomelang with, disastrous effect, and our fielders have latterly captured c* good few puniera' Bcalps by the aid of its -equine namesame. Boomerang was solidly supported ior tho K-ew Zealand Clip and Auckland Cup by the lank and file of the punters' brigade, and as they Oidtnot get a ran for their money in either case the horse's name will not sound too musically in their -ears until 'time has sof toied Ihe sting of their grief. — Tha proposed Gambling Bill which the Government had on the stocks at the dyin^ end of last session was very weak in spots, nnd particularly weak where it made provisicn for pony-racing with far too much liberality. Tho bill was supposed to be- necessary in order to curtail gambling, and tbo value of the provision ior pory-racing, which is gambling pure and simple, was made evident at the recent Takapuna meeting, -when the betting on the pony -was heavier than on tiny other race on the programme. — The pair of Timor ponies -which were exhibited at "Wyndham show represented a breed of horses 'that is becoming very f ashion-nbl-e among pony fanciers in the cities. Mr H. A. Scott, of Duncdm, -the owner of the pair in question, informs us (says «r. exchange) that he imported the stallion Sweet "William -from New Soufh "Wales, with a -view to breeding extra small, but stout and active, ponies for work in the Tvaitangaia and other underground colleries. There is said to be an unlimited demand for ponies of this cla«B v at Xaitangata. — Few races have done more to make *urf history than the Criterion Stakes (says a Home paper). Its very name suggests a test of merit, and whereas it is one of the oldest two-year-old races of which we possess any record, so much sentiment clings to the event that it was chiefly an its account that regret was felt at the closing of the old course over whioh the race had been so long decided three years ago. Among its winners I are horses who have ever been regarded as champions of ibe turf— Thormanby, Lord Lyon, Rosicrucian, Prince -Charlie, Ormonde, Ilying Fox, and; Pretty Polly, to wit. —It io -evident that a unit or two can escape notice in the regiment of thorses -which are trained in Sydney, as «une Australian papers recently remarked in connection with. Berisina's- nomination foi the Carrisgfan 'Stakes that, as -the daughter of Stepniak and Ambush w«b only engaged in the one, .race, she was probably put in to get the handicapper's opinion. Berisina has besn in Sydney for several months, but the writer has been told on good authority that the filly has become affected in the respiratory organs, and consequently the noise she will make on the turf may not be "See, the conquering hero comes" brand of music. —An important item i sporting news* by • the English mail, wired from Adelaide, is the fact ~hat Master Frank "Wootton, who has baen riding tins season with such marked success, was suspended at Newmarket oi Oatober 26. After the race for the Criterion Nursery Handicap Wootton was called T>efore the stewards, and suspended until Novembe* 5 for having used his -whip too free'y upon the Duke- of Devonshire's Word of Honour colt. On a previous occasion Wootton was admonished for n piniilar thing on the same horse. Young Wootion had been engaged to ride anotbor horse later in the afternoon, and was permitted to fulfil -his contract. — Amongst the youngsters which leave been paid up for in the Middle Park .Plate is the badly-named All Guns, a son of Pallas and Greek Maid. Surely with such names as those possessed by tbe sire and dam, a more suitable and euphonious name could have been t found for the colt. For instance. Palladium was the Trojan statue il the goddess Pallas, and dozens of other names are open for selec- j tion; but .perhaps plain Greece would be more appropriate, as it might help the colt to .gallop. A horse by any name would go as fast or slow, but there is no- difference be- j tween the price of names, as they are all obtainable free, gratis, and for nothing. I — For several years past, since the retirement of Wakeful, the s-rme old material has done duty in the weight-for-age class ; and | there is no Health in us. 'Victoria caiinot claim Poseidon; and it is the fact that tbs principal races, handicaps or otherwise, have been won by horses bred in other States. I dpn't like to bs pessimistic (cays "Ribbleden"), but what with the lack of enterprise in the breeding industry, and bungling legislative interference with men's liberties and T.R.C. control, the turf in Victoria has come to a pretty pass! It Eeeits to me that in the course of a few years, if there is no improven»ent. the stakes offered for competition by the V.R.C. and the V.A T.C. will be cut up almost wholly among horses bred without the borders of Victoria, mainly from the New South "Wales side. — With the defeat of Slieve Gallion, by Galvani, in the Middle Park Plate, the last hope (says an English writer) of our possession of a really high-class two-year-old has gone, unless it is found in the mysterious St. Martin, who has yet to run. Galvani i* evidently a creature of moods, for whereas he ran at Kempten like a veritable coward, he fought out a. long and desperate battle in moat courageous fashion in tbe Middle Park Plate, and on the wide expanse of the Heath he ran a3 true and straight as a gun barrel. There was apparently no excuse whatever for Slieve Gallion, for it was a fast gallop from beginning to end, and had he bpen good enough, he was always in a position to win. A few days afterwards Galvani wes -easily beaten in the Criterion Handicap by Polar Star. —In the "Reminiscences of Lady Dorothy Xeville" the following amusing passage occurs: — There was George Payne, who dropped his worldly means broadcast into the treacherous quicksand which is euphemistically known under the name of the turf. In some respects, perhaps, not altogether a very shining light, he was always unruffled and pleasant in conversation, with great aptitude of speech, for -extrication from any awkward position. "Are you coming to churcn, Mr Payne?" was on one occasion the stern ' interrogation of his .hostess, a very great j lady, who descended upon him in all the severity of nil b,ei Sabbath psmop.'v. "2*p,

Duchess, I am not," he replied, ma-king swiftly towards the door, but, pausing, as by a polite afterthought previous to his exit, he exclaimed with magnificent emphasis, "Not that I see any harm in it."

— When the last mail "to hand left England Ziacjas still held bis place a-t the head cif the list of winning stallions,, with a grand total of .25£ wins, worth £18,773 ss ; Carbine, who had two wins at Newmarket, changed places with Ayrshire, the former with 17 win 9 worth £15.203, and the latter 80 -wins worth £15,530. Gallinule comes next with 23 wins for ~£l4-,450, -followed by Persimmon, 24 for £11,302; Isinglass, 29£ for £13,196; Maro, 20* for £12,968; Duma Forget, 10 for £12,246; Love Wisely, 37J for £10,337 15s; Wildflower, six ior £9921; Cyflene, 23 J for £9401 10s; Florisell 11, 16 for £9257 10s; Matchmaker, £7 for £8924; St. Frusquin, 34J for £8S51 ; Laveno, 13 for £7696 10s; Desmond, 274 for £7621 10s; Orme, 29 ffir £7541; and Winkfield, nin6 for £7244. The most important changes ior the week were the revival of Orme, and the inclusion of Laveno among the sires whose progeny won over £7000. cally."

— A huge sum of money changed hands in England between layers and backers as the .result of Polymelus's remarkable victory in the Cambridgeshire. Big winners were the Joel group — -Mr S. B. Joel, the owner of the winner, and his brother, Mr J. B. Joel, both of whom speculate boldly on occasions. ]Mr Sol Joel and ihis friends never left off backing Polymelus 'for the race . so long as the "bookmakers would lay to a price, .and it- i» estimated that the owner won a sum in bets of not less than £100,000. The stroke of luck by -which this wp.s made possible is simply amazing. The great event turned on the incident in the sale ring at Newmarket a month -ago, when Mr Faber lost a fortune in selling the horse for 4200g5, and Mt 601 Joel made one by buying it. Although there were 20 starters for the' race Mr -Sol Joel never faltered in his 'belief in -ihe ability of his horse to score, and just as the Tace was to start accepted two -wagers, £2500 to £2000 and £1100 to £1000.

— Commenting- on the victory of Pclymelus m the Cambridgeshire, who started at 11 to 10 against, an English writer says it is 'doubtful if in the history of the race there has ever been a hotter fevourrte than -Polymelus The restricted odds offered against Polymelus may be nscribsd to the fact that the owner, Mr S. Joel, is a South African magnate, and to ihe immense popularity of double-event betting in London at present, so -much so -that one sporting writer said: — "Bridge holds a, big sway in the clubs, but I dnubt if any pastime has been so popular as -the one in vogue at the present time. I refer to the attempts to -find the winner of the double event. I «un told that the Stock Exchange men are dabbling in doubles on the Cesarewrtch and Cambridgeshire to the exclusion of Tanganyikas, and "that the American boom is nothing to the transactions quoted over •the doubles."

— Straigb.t-a.way mile courses are popular in England, and races are frequently decided over straight- tracks much longer than eight iutlonge. Complaint against straight tracks of .undue length :bave latterly arisen in England, as it is -reasonably contended that only a small portion of these raxes are -seen by -the public, who pay the anoney to -keep the game .going. It is worthy of note whilst on this subject that the principal >event on the first day of tbe Duoedin Club's summer meeting will be decided over seven -furlongs, of which •the .first three and a-half will be- ovea a -straight then about a furlong is round an easy turn, with a straight run of about two and a-half furlongs. The seven-furlong course at Wingatui is horseshoe in shape, and is an ideal one to provide an excellent view of a race. With such a course the chance of a ■fluky win is 'nvt too great, as th-e long stretches .give the best iorses a proper chance to asser* themselves.

— The Dnnedin Jockey Cub's summer meeting will introduce a coupl-e of what are [ fiire to bp much-appreciated improvements I at "Wingatu!. A semaphore showing the starters nnd their riders is to be erected opposite the grand stand, and in a position where what it indicates can be -easily read from both the lawn and outside enclosure. The public have a keen desire to learn, with a minimum of delay, the official record of fcha climax of a race, and, wrfrh the obje-ct j oi baing up-to-date in that respect, the existing- judge's box is to he altered so that Jhe numbers of the placed horEea can be displayed in a similar manner to that which is in use at Riccarton. A casualty room is also to be erected, and there is apparent y little doubt that jf Dame Fortune gave a couple of good big winning smiles on the club's efforts to cater for the racing publi", t the Wmgatui couree would soon become as I complete in appointments as anyone could I desire. — The tl-eaih is reported from the south o.f Silkworm, the son of Beaton Delaval and Lady Moth, who carried Mr G. G. Stead's colours with conspicuous buccess as a two-year-oW. Silkworm got badly torn with bcrbw,re, and subsequently succumbed to blcoclpoieoning. As a two-year-old Silkworm started in nine races,, and won six times. He made his debut in tha Hastings Stakes, an<3 beat six others. He finished second to Ills stable companion, Golden Lily, in the Welcome Stakes, and subsequently won the Spring Nursery Handicap with 8.13, and was backed to a £1 13s -livid-end in a field of 11. His other success were in the Greit Northern Foal Stakes. A.X.C. MidFumnitr Handicap, W R. C. Wellesley Stakes and Wellington Stakes. H-e also ran second to Machine Gun in the A.R.C. Royal Stakes Silkworm, during- his brief career on the turf, ivon £1790 in slakes, and as he wai a stoutly-bred young horse, his death will prove a big loss to his owner and to the bleeders of Southland genorally. — The London Sportsman stated in a recent issue that Mr Coventry was not very successful with his gate-starting on the first two days of the Sandown t meeting, but when it came to starting jumpers by the flp.g the trouble got worne. In the first race, the Pirbrighi Selling Hurdle Race, the whole field of 18 broke away, and some of them came well past the first flight of hurdles before they could be pulled up. Then when they were" ultimately started one was left at the post, and refused resolutely to make any effort in pursuit of the field There- was no gate to blame for this animal's disinclination to start, so I suppose (says a writer in the paper mentioned) we must assume that he dislikes the flag! The Norbiton Handicap Hurdle Race caused further trouble, inasmuch as this time there were no fewer than three false starts, and again one of the field was left. If there tilings happen when staid old jumpers are being started, one hesitates to imagine what would be the result of flag-starting a field of flat racers among which a few. bnch as Achilles and .Black Arrow, might be included. I suppose we shall be told that Achilles and Black Arrow would tie all right if there was no gate, but this ie all nonsense. The gate has little or nothing to do with their Ttgaries. At Doncaster Achilles refused to leave the paddock for a long time, and at Ascot Black Arrow came back into the paddock after he had been ridden out on to she course. No gate was visible to either horse on these occasions.

— The American correspondent of the Sydi>«X Referee remarks what "There i» joy in

American turf circles over The performances of Rosebon, the strapping son of Ben Stron.e. The big gelding is now known as the king of sprinters. After failure to lound to in the midd'3 part of the racing season, it looked as though the speedy :five-year-o!d had lost his ciown, but on October 16, at the Beli niont Track, New York, he sprinted seven i furlong 3 m 1.22, and he is now as 'much of j a h'-ro as he was. when he set the world's record lor six furlongs at 1.11 8-5. The 1 22 for se-\en furlongs cut three full seconds from the record. An interesting stcry in connection with Roseben's turf oaTesr is 'the way Davy Johnson, the biggest plunger in Ihe United States, lost and -regained paseasion of ill 1 ;- gelding. Johnson went t>i the bad finsncially trying to make a distance rnnner of Rossben. The -horse won at a mile, but be rebelled at a longer journey. By the time Johnson saw the folly of starting the sprinter in distances Roseben was aL but ruinad. He was soar and track-sore, nnd meanwhile- Johnson, through, reverses, had to turn the horse over to L. O. Appleby, in whose colours, after careful nursing, he recovered his old-time form. Johnson bet heavily every time Roseben started during the last two months, and as the gelding won half a dozen races. Johnson became the 'proud possessor of the sprinter once again. The only time Roeeban was defeated in recent starts was when he had 150lb up. and then only by a nod." —An English writer says : "There is nnotbsr question which I should like to ventilate. It is a fact. I &up.pose, thrt the course on which the ■Cesnre-witch is decided is absclute'y the finest in the world. nately, however, one of the features ihat renders it so magnificent, is also a- most serious drawback. First of all, there is the straight stretch of a mile from ihs starting -poet to thi Ditch, and then the run across the flart to the winning-post. The two 'arms' form an obtuse angle. Short of .an absolutely straight track from end' to end, there could be nothing -better than this 1 — theoretically. There is, however, a world of difference between theory and practice. Inasmuch as the public see nothing of 'the first half of tbe race for the Cesarewitch — the monetary glimpse of the -field running across the gap is hardly worth counting — the course does not meet a very essential requirement. "When a man pays to see racing he expects to see it." 'Not until the competitors for a race on any portion of the Cesarewitch course are a mile or so from home can the spectators on tbe grand stand begin to get the glimpse of an idea of what is happening. Some Australians who were at Newmarket recently were almost dumb with amazement when they were shown -ther long course. They found it hard .to believe that the British public could be induced to travel great distances to 'see' a Tace run on a track so much of -which is out of ths -range of vision." The writer suggests -a new -course, sfi that the public could see the race. —An «xch.ange -reports that "competitions" in horsemanship are a strong feature «t the North Island shows. In the wire-jumping <event at Hawexa Czarina, a -wonderful little pony, easily beat her lugger opponents. Gay Boy got out of hand on one occasion, and bolted with Miss Exley. The horse made straight for the fence near the horse-boxes in a manner that showed (plainly he intended taking the high -fence, if it. barred hjs way. Fortunately 'a gats was oj»sn, and 'the lady managed io steer him through. Then he dashed p.t full -speed right into the <crowd, where be was pulled up. Subsequently he was put over p.H the fences, taking second prize. The high jumping proved a -Thrilling competition. The five competing horses were followers of the hounds at the Egniont H.C. meets. Haere'.yn was the .first to be thrown out, failing at about Sft. Tarragon kept in a little longer, and then a great battle ensued between Rawhiti (pony), "Gay Boy, and Mignon. The trio cleared oft 2in, and the bar was raised to sft 3in. at which both Gay Boy and Mignon failed in three attempts to ciear the obstacle. Contrary to expectations, Rawhiti, a marvel of^ '-mrniattrrc horseflesh, cleared the bar in the first attempt. Miss Maggie Briggs accomplished a probably unprecedented feat of -winning the high jump bare-back. She rode 'Rawhiti without a saddle, and handled her mount so well that the judge awarded her the prize for tbe best rider. The winning pony, Rawhiti, is 13.2 in height, and after winning the jump was taken up to the hurdle for comparison. With neck extended his chin could just reach tbe bar, and he had no difficulty in walking underneath it.

— Though it was sufficiently announced that the owner of Poseidon, who races as "Mr U. R. Robertson," was absent at the other side of the world whilst that colt was winning his races, it seems a number ot peopie wao uu.se a point of besieging -owners of horses who happen to win big races for money and assistance to various deserving and undeserving objects, hp.ve decided thai Mr Hugh Dixson, of Dixeon's tobacco factory, -Sydney, is the owner of the famous colt, and accordingly he has been bombarded with all eorts of demands until he has become very sick of it, and has had to advertise that -neither he nor any of his sons own Poseidon. Meanwhile the fortunate possessor of the Cup winner -is escaping all this undesirable attention. It appears scores of letters have been sent to the Mr Dix-=on referred to, and (says an exchange) he has been given quite a lively time and nuich annoyance that he Ivpb done nothing to de?erve. It would appear that there »re awkward penalties for greatness on the turf. — Trigg's remarkably fine feat of riding five consecutive winners at Worcester on 25th October (writes the London Sportsman) calls to mind the parallel case at Edinburgh in 1902, when, curiously enough, the same jockey was tbe "star" performer. Then Trigg, on 3rd October, 1902, rode the first live winners off the reel — Queen of the Gipsies (11 to 4), Reginald (5 to 4 on), Kirkbride- (5 to 4 on), St. Hubert (7 to 4), and Dewdroo (7 to 2). Judged by the betting returns, which may be said to reflect the chances .oi the candidates, yesterday's performance was even better, the successful horstß on which he had mounts starting at the following prices: — Precentor, 11 to 8 on; Scribo, sto 1 ; Cherry Well, 100 to 30, Remindful. 8 to 1; and Dundreary, 7 to 2 on. When Trigg scored in such irresistible fafehion at Edinburgh m 1002 racing was going en .'t Newmarket; jesterday also racing was pioceeding at headquarters while he was putting up his line sequence of wins at Worcester. — The secretary of the Australian Jockey Club, Mr T S. Clibborn, is in receipt of a letter froni a piomment sportsman in England, with regard to the riding oi the Sydney boy, Master Frank Wootton, in which . it is staled that when approached by some of the be3t patrons cf the English turf for first call on that youngster's services for Jiext season, the lad's father, Mr Richard Wooiton, declined to place them at anybody's disposal, as on occasions he is likely to want the boy to ride his own horses. The letter further says that an offer of a retainer -ot £2000 a year for second coll on the boy's services was refused, and this will give ai. idea of the .amounts earned per annum by Maher and other riders at the head of the profession. Mr Clibborn states, with .reference to a paragraph in the Sydney Daily Telegiaph, concerning Frank Wootton being debarred by the rules of racing from riding h«r«, thftt the A.J.C. had no power to permit

liim to follow th.2 oailing of a jockey. Being but - 12 '"yes 13 'of age, he was debarred, Mr Clibborn says, Ly the Children's Protection Act. Fortunately for English sportsmen, iii- such bar exists in England. Quite latently, Frank "Wcotton rode at all the important English meetings, end not without success. JAt Catwick he ha-d seven mounts in two afternoons, and won the County Nursery Handicap on his father's Nemours, who started ot 5 to 4 on, ran second on Lord Derby's Gourd in Horley Handicap, but w*a unplaced in tho others, his mounts inciudlr.g Harcourt. At Newmarket -on the Jollowing day, Wootton was -unplaced on Instep in Southfiald Plate, and second on iLavaina in Erning Handicap, but -at Lingfield ha won twice in succession — ihe Non-stayers" Plate on Lischaua .and Cage Selling Nursery Handicap -on Mr -Ooley, arad was "unplacel on I£t Wootton's Floreatan in "October Nursery Handicap. «At Sandown Park Wootton.' rode several times unsuccessfully. Th« youngster is now ie South Africa.

— Commenting upon the foolishness of jockeys trying to be clever by- cutting matters fine on the winning post, a representative of the Sportsman writes: "I went over -to Vienna) last Sunday to see tihe Austria Preis, aud- it so fell out that a case of this sort hfid jus* occurred, with the exception that instead of being beaten a certain jockey won a race liauds down by a neck. The stewards of the* Austrian Jockey Club called the jockey before them. You won by a neck; -couldn't you have won uny further?' they asked. The--jockey was delighted that he .ha£»found him"selF on such a good horse, snd replied dn « pleased tone : ' I Tiad always -got them beat, sir; I could have won- by as fur as I liked." Tile retori of the siewwrda to this aßtoxxishecl him, ss, if delivered in England, it -would astonish an English jockey. f Then that ! ahows you were trying to chest the handicapI per, and you ate fined £10.' I have no sort o£ wish to criticise the action -of the Austrian Jockey Club stewards, but the jockey in question had no notion that in doing what he did 'he bad done anything wrong. A jockey in' | A.U3tria was fined £5 by the stewards because be was not out one morning 'before "breakfast i to ride exercise, unfl on the -whole "the jockeys [ tliere appear 'to be" treated somewhat drasti—An exchange reports that the ammaj meeting of the Central Otago Club, held at tha j 'Shamrock Hotel. Ophir, on 'Thursday evening 'last, -was 'a fa'iriy representative one. Mn E. F. Gerkens occupied the chair. The balance sheet, -which was read and adopted, showed the finances of the ehib to be in & satisfactory state — there being -a credit balance of 20s. In the receipts, members' lees •£82 10s. privileges £18 Us were the principal items in a total of £181 6s Cd, while on tha expenditure side £127 10s lor stakes was the chief item. Mr E. F. Gcrkens was elected president ; vice-presidents, Messrs S. Cameron, J. "W. Perriam, »C. IHuddleston, and T. Marslin; secretary. Mr T. Duggan. A -general discussion then ensued re the advisability of getting a more suitable date, and it was suggested that an effort be made to hold the raosf meeting on St. Patrick's Day. ttx S. Cameron then moved — "That ibis meeting standsadjourned till 8.30 p.m. onr January 1, at; Flannery's Hotel, -Ophir, for -the -puspoee oi arranging date and fixing place -of meeting-; and that -notice "be sent to all members of .tha club." — Seconded by Mt (Ryan and carried. 'The meeting 'then 'tenninateft. Commenting upon the yearling sales in England, the '•Special 'Oornmisßianer," -writing in the "Spotting Life, «ays: — '*©ne thing: has .been made 'abundantly -clear, bbA #hart is, buyers will hardly lcdk a second time at yearlings who -are not out of 'good-class mares. Tho sire counts for a good deal;' but the dam is all-important. The soonpr our breeders reahee tho ia?t the batter .malters will go for them. I Tiave hammered) away at this point more Mian once during the last few months, and I daresay I shall ha-ve occasion to revert to jt again And again in the months to come. The a-verage quality of the yearlings seen at Doncaster wns higher than usual. 'There were, however, sadly too many 'weeds' brought forth. Some of them, would have been dear as gifts. It is qualits* that pays. Better far to send up two yearlings that will fetch lUOOgs each, *<han 3to whicb yield lOOgs each. The two will 'be uior-e profitable, both immediately and prospectively — prospectively, because they stand! a chance of making a name for themtelves, and for the stud where they were / seared. The 20 will probably never bs 'beard of again. So we work round to the -mischief that is wrought by the constant deportation of -good mares. I am well aware that in depoTtingthe tendency .to let the foreigner have all the biood stock he is prepared to pay for, I assume a front -which some authorities vill not take. Only the other Uay I waa discussing this subject with a very ■wellknown breeder, and to my sorrow I found that he cheerfully acquiesced in the raid on, our resources. 'Let the foreigners come, by all means,' Jie said, 'thay improve the market.' My contention is that any enhancement in prices that may manifest itself is only temporary. We are bound to suffer iv the long, run, because we are parting with our capital. If the foreigners bought yearlings no harm would result;' but that is tha very .last- thing they dream of doing; the/ scarcely ever look at a yearling. What they want sre our best stallions and best mares', and nothing short "of the best will satisfy them. And our own men of wealth, -who -seek diversion on the turf, are just as ful'y alive to the importance of buying yearliqgsproduced by high-class mares. {Breeders -cannot both have their cake And eat it. It they are unable to resist the offers for their good mare 6, they must not 'be -disappointedif the stock they obtain from the remainder fai) to meet with approval in the home market. I -do not say we .are already on. the brink of the precipice. We are stilt producing the finert thoroughbreds in tha world, and we shall continue to do so for a good many years to come ; but the trend of things is not what it should be."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19061212.2.162.5

Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2752, 12 December 1906

Word Count
6,769

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2752, 12 December 1906

Working