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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Nominations for the Alexandra meeting fall* due on December 4. — -Muvkifid b*s been scratched for the Auckland Cap and Railway Handicap. — Nominations- for the Lake County Jockey Club's annual meeting are- due on December 1. — Munjeet has been shipped to the North Island, where she is bqpkea to race at Feilding,

— The profit made by the Victorian Racing Club over ;heir Melbourne Cup pans out at £7900. — The handicaps for the first day of the Dunedin Jockey Club's euannner meeting are dv* on December 18. — Czar-avna, broke down badly on the frrs-t day of the Timaru meeting axid is not likely to be wen under silk again. — Comp'imentary tickets for the Tahuna Park Trotting Club's meeting are to hand, and acknowledged with thanks. — An Auckland telegTani states thai Multificl was scratched for ihe Auckland Cup and Railway HaJidi«&s> on Wednesday afternoon. — A. Melbourne cable sta/tee that the Williamstown Cup winner, Ellis, has been sold to his trainer, Musgrove, for 600 guineas. — A Melbourne cablegram states that tl>e Sandhurst Cup resulted as follows: — Tulkexoo 1, Mira 2, Prooeedor 3. Won by three lengths. — The proposal to tax the V.B.C. to tha extent of about £200fl a year under the G*cning Bill is being warmly resented in Victoria-. —An English pauper states that, successful as Sam Loates was as a jockey, he bids fair to outrival that success as a trainer amd owner. — A poster programme of the Hawke's Bay Jcckfy Club's lis* of stakes' for the present .season, is to hand, and acknowledged with. thanks. — The Multiform horse Highland' Fling was put under the hammer recently in Melbourne, and was passed at 250gs. He had a reserve* on him of SOOgs. — Clanchattan, 'Glenculloch, and Golden Cairn have been shipped to Feilding. Glenculloch has registered a couple of good galops since the Qup meeting. — Thundarer was the unlucky horse in the Timaru Handicap, as he was slow >off the mark, and finished a closa second after making up a lot of ground. — Poseidor. is the Greek god of the *ea, identical with the Roman Neptune. Poseidon is pronounced " Po-si-don," with the accwit on the second syllable. — Grey Seaton, the half-brother by Seaton Delaval to Canteen, was sold under the hammer in Melbourne recently at 65gs, and is booked to go to Singapore. — The New Zealand hurdler Hydrant was passed at 240gs when under the hammer in 'Melbourne recently. There was a reserve of 250gs on the Jet d'Eau gelding. —It is proposed to hold, at an early date, a large pubhc meeting in the Town Hall, Sydney, to advocate an amendment of the N.S.W. 'James end Wagers Act. — It has been cabled from Australia that Mr H. Brown, the owner of Hydrant, intends retiring from the turf. Mr Brown • was recently disqualified by the Victorian RacingCiub. —On Thursday last Mr Geo. G. Stead had the misfortune to lose ids yearling filly La Champagne, by Multiform — La Valiere. Acute inflammation of the bowels was the cause of the filly's decease. — The Strath-Taieri Hack Racing Club will hold" their second annual meeting at Middlemarch on Friday, -and the various eivenLs which will figure on the card should provide eoinß interesting sport. -7- Royal Glen was shipped to Sydney last weelt. It is rumoured that the filly was fairly smart when in training at Taldhurst, and may be confidently expected to pay her way in the Commonwealth. — Soutt's stock were in evidence at the Timaru meeting, and his prestige as a sire - did ■ not lose anything by the game manner in which, Pas Seul, Silkweb, Aimee SouJt, arjd Franc fought out their races. - — The well-performed horse Berthier was recently under the hammer in Melbourne, and passed at 520gs. He had a reserve on him. of 700gs, and, ;;onig by the book, he "would not have been a dear horse at the price. —It is und-erstood that L. H. Hewitt has recently received an offer from Mr Lionel Robertson — for whom, the well-known Australian J. E. Brewer trains — asking him to ride his horses in England. — The Australasian states that L. H Hewitt has accepted an engagement to ride m England, and that he leaves for the Old Country within two or three weeks. Prior to sailing for Home, Hewitt has returned to New Zealand. — Delaware led into tho straight when he was started ni the Wil lamstown Cup, but he fftd«d sway at the business end of tho r«ce. and hnished seventh. The son of Seaton Delavai carried 7.6, and went out a 14 to i chance. — Owner . "Yes, he's a nice colt, and I thought of calling him The Beli." Fx - iend : "Oh! that's ab=urd." Owner: "Why? He's by " Friend: "Yes; but the first time he's pulled " And a, lifelong friendship was ended for ever. — The Drummond Hack Racing Club held their annual meeting last week, and is reported to have experienced a fairly successful gathering. A southern states that '* the racing was hardly up to the usual standard seen at the meeting.'' — Noctuiform was quoted at 33's to 1 at the start for the Cesarewitch Stakes. H_> was prominent for about a mile, and then faded away. Nightfall started in the same race at 50's to 1, and was- never nientione 1 in the description of the running. — The Hotchkiss colt ElUs won the Williauistown Cup, one mile and three furlongs, in 2min 21isec. This is a second slower than the 2mm 2OJsec which St. Ambrose put up when he won the s-ame race and estabLshed an Australasian record for the journey. — Amorist the winners at Timaru wer« Savoury and Vardo, who were both raced unsuccessfully in Australia. Savoury prior to his win last week had not won a race for two years, and Vardo's laet vctory was achieved on the West Coast in May last. — The Menschikoff — Apparition colt, who sold last year at 60gs, and the Meuschikoff — Cuiralba colt, who gold at the fame time for 75gs, were recently auctioned in Melbourne «t Gogs and 45gs respectively. The former is known as Moonbi and the latter as Cuirass. — Solution has evidently felt the stress of the goodly shaTe of racing -she has been subjected to in Australia, and finished badly in her last race at the V.R.C. meeting. Tha amount of work <and probably the climate has told its tale, and she is to be treated to a spell. — Th© downfall of favourites was a notable feature of the Timiaru meeting. On the first day not a, single favourite got up. and on the second 1 one of the favourites which scored owed his success in a measure to the indifferent horsemanship displayed by the rider of an opponent in the- race. — Menschikoff was a starter in the Flying Stakes, seven furlongs, decided on the third day of the V.R.C. meeting. He carried top weight of 9.2, and conceded 2lb to Charles Stuart aud 51b to Solution, who started a 3 to 1 on chance. The Stepniak horse finished last, whilst Solution was fourth. — John A. Drake, « prominent American owner, recently sold all his racehorses because it was impossible to back any of them lur large sums at a fair price. Drake is a very heavy bettor, and as anything he backed generally had a good chance, some of Ihs bookmakers were inclined to fight shy of him. —In winning the Flatbush, a tv.-o-year-old race run at Sheepahead (New Yoiki in September, D« Mund, with BS, r.iu beveii fur- .

longs in lmin 25 4-ssec. At the same fixture a three-year-o'd named Lotus was credited with running six furlongs in 1.10, co that , the track, even for dirt, must have been won- , derfully fast. — A post mortem examination stowed- that Golden liily, the Ixew Zealand brett filly bought by Mr S. P. Mackay, of Western Australia, from her breeder, Mr G. G. Stead, ami who died recently from enlargement of the heart, had had six ribs fractured on one side and four on the other at some early period of her career. — The Australasian says that the spring i.f 1906 will he looked back to as belonging to Poseidon He stood out Trom all the other horses, just as Newhaver did in 1896. Th^ disappeara-nce of Emir arid Gladsome has left U3 with a very poor lot of old horses, and Achilles must now be rasily the ber/ oid horse in Australasia. — Latest English files show Lad a*; o be at the- head of the winning stations, with 24£ wins, total value of £18,610. Next to him comes Carnine, with 15 wins for a total of £14.366; while third on the list i 3 Persimmon, whose progeny have in 24 event 3 won £14,302. Gallinule," Ayrshire, and Marco follow in rotation. —In America, Little Squaw's 2.9J stood ao the pacing record for a * hree-year-old filly from October 14. 1899, until the 18th of September last, when Brenda Yorke, in winning at Columbus, cut the time down to 2.8j. The world's record for three-year-old pacer 3 of any sex is 2.5J, and was made by the stallion Klatawah in IS9B. — The. Williamstown Cup, of lOOOsovs. one mile^and three furlongs, which was decided on November 12, was won by the New Zealand bred colt Ellis, who was followed home by Czarvitch and Proceeder. Ellis, who won by a head, is a son of Hotchkies and Edith Cureton, the daughter of Castor «md the famous mare Frailty. — A Sydney writer remarks that, according to the existing law, there can be no betting done on trotting races or coursing matches. This is a serious matT-er for the New South Wales Trotting Club, whose members are making great efforts to get the Government to aJter the act co as io legalise betting at trotting race meetings. — Patrons of the Vincent Jockey Club will be pleased to hear that the club's request for tho running of a special train from Alexandra to Omakau on both days of the races on January 1 and 2 has practicably been granted. Besides conveniencing the local people, visitors from a distanoe will be able to drive to Alexandra and then travel to Omakau by rail. — Rucegoers of a few years back will renseniber that when the late Mr J. Stephenson and Mr J. Hazlett were racing partners their colours caipably worn by T. Chapman. Thi3 wa-s called to mind ait Timaru hist week when a little midget who ia a eon of T. Chapman donned silk at the meeting. He r-ode Lady LyonoTs each day, and for a. novice shaped very well. — Petrovna ran a good race in her omly appearance under silk at Timaju, and looked to have a, winning chance over the first four furlongs, but Clementine, to whom the Stepniak mare was conceding 3&t, drew out a.t the finish and won comfortably. Another Stepniak in Volodia. ran well in the same •race, and would have been closer up had she obtained a clear run. — On the eve of the English Cambridgeshire . Stakes Polynielus was subjected to much hostility from certain rmgmen. Th*y took the statement fo r truth that he was off his feed, and was coughing, and had a cracked heel ; but though his owner denied all the reports, and announced that his horse was in splendid health, £20,000 was wageied against him in a few minutes at an average of 7 to 1. — The victory of Mintagon in the Cesarewitch was hailed with the greatest satisfaction at Malton (England), and it was so confidently expected that the little sporting town went "nap" on him. The rejoicings the night of the racs were as hearty as in the good old days of Blair Athol and Bimk Benny, except that the church bells did not ring, as they did when the mare won the Deiby m 1857. — Crumbling fret are often in sympathy with the aiimontaiy canal. Tonics," as irori and gentian, with good feeding, should soon :nrh;<\pce them. Stimulation of the corone's wi<!i a mild embrccation, such as one prl spirit of turpentine and four parts olive oil two or three times a week, will promote a be* tor growth. If clips are used upon tho '•hoes, place them in a fiesh position. — The American Horseman states that Alta, M'Donaldi is the only driver who has marked two performances better than 2nnn lsec. They are Major Dp.'.mar, linin J9i»pc, th» champion trotting gelding, and Danel, 2niin Ojsec the champion pacing mare. Ho Is al&o the only racing diiver who has marked three in 2min 2sec, as he gave Sweet Marie a lecoid in that time. 'Phis is a remarkable showing. — Given a spell, and got ready for tha autumn, Solution may b& a hard one to beat in the Newmarket Handicap : but I (says "MartindaV) really believe that, though possessed of undoubted pace, she is not whit may be termed a battler at any distance; while if anything can hold her for a furlong she is very easily beaten, and that we have »ome who can p.ice it with her public form is evidence. — The taste for horse flesh as a comestible is growing in Paris. In 1901. 22,000 horses, mules, and asses were slaughtered for food in the crty, and last year this fig-are was nearly doubled, the number of animals killed being 42,000. Many supporters of failures in the last New Zea,l<and Cup. and other race*, too, for thai matter, would no doubt like to hear of the one-time fancied equines beang dialled up as a Parisian delicacy. — The writer has witnessed some judging lately which has baen open to question, and in that respect it may not be out of place to quote seotion 1 of Part XXXI, Rules of Racnvg, which reads —"The decision of the judge declaring a horse to have won, or +o be entitled to a place, shall be final in determining the order in whach horse 3 have passed the winning post ■ pro\ ided tha-t the judge may correct any mistake within 15 ininutea." — The Sydney Referee reports that the treating stallion Chieftain, owned by Mr John Cameron, r.f Moree, dropped dead ieoenl!>Chieftain was very successful iv the show ring, and 1113 progeny have scored heavily in a similar direction. Among the good perfcimers sired by Chieftain were Chance, 2.23 ; Auctioneer. 2 28 ; Moree. 2.29 ; DaiFy G., two miles in 5.10; Loseby's Chief, 2.35; Glendon, 2.38; Sylvia, 2.40; and the champion show ring horse Morton*3 Chief, 2.40. A bill was introduced into the West Australian Assembly on November 1 which , will have the effect of preventing any new racecourse being opened in West Australia for* the next two year* without the sanction of th© Colonial Secretary. - Tho currency of tht measure will be two years ' only, as tLe Government recognises that within that period it will be necessary to bring forward new and comprehensive , legislation for legulating the control of ; horse-racing. : — The American trotting mare Sweet Mane i was in great form at Columbus (O.) a few weeks ago. In a race s>he put up 2nun 3jsec i ior * nu'e, which *s a id/_c a«i-ord for m<u:e.i ; :

- and a few days later, without the assistance [ of a pacemaker, trotted a mile in 2sec in a spin against time. On the same afterr.oon the pacing mare Ecstatic, who has a record of 2nnn ljsec, put up 2min 2sec in the ; first heat of a race, but was beaten in <he • nest two by Angus Fomter in 2min 3£sec and . 2min 32^0 respectively. [ —In September, 1806, a pony llhds Sin , high, belonging to a horse-deale* of Chard, i was backed to travel 100 miles in sixteen i successive hours. The course chosen was bet-ween Honiton 'and Exeter, a distance of 16 mile?, and this the pony was to cover six times, with an additional four miles to complete the hundred. Ridden by a lad weighing little short of 10.0. the pony started at 4.15 a.m. from Honiton, and, being liberally rested between the journeys, performed the undertaking with the greateet ease in 13hr lOmiii, cr 2hr lOmin less than the time allowed. — Major Euetacs Loder, who is one of (he most successful parfrons of the tnrf. was again an important winner at IC-ewinarkeb last : month, when his coJt Galvaiii beat Sliever Gallion iv the Middle Park Plate, of 203550v6, for two-year-olds, six furlong". There ware five starters, and odds of 4 to 1 were laid on Slieve Gallion, while about Galvani, who won cleverly by half a length, 10 to 1 was obtainable. Galvani, according to this form, haa an excellent chance of following in the footsteps of his stable companion, Spearmint, by winning the Derby for Major Loder nest year. — When the last mail left America, an effort was being made to bring together in a match the two great paoers Dan Patch and The Broncho. Dan Patch holds the record 1.55 in a record-breaking trial; and The Bronch), a mare, holds the words record for the three fastest consecutive heais in a race — 2.55, 2.4J, 2.3 i. If the match is made it is expected all records for three heats in v race will be lowered. Although The Broncho has never paced better than two minutes, she has never been put to her top in a race, «nd it is expected two minutes will be broken for th» three lieata. — When the last mail left England. Lad as was at the head of "winning sires, with 10 winners of 24 races, worth £18,610; and Carbine was second on the list with eight winners of 15 races, value £14,366. Persimmon (by St. Simon) was but £i behind Carbine, and slightly under £300 ahead of Gallinule. Then followed Ayrshire, £13,953; Marco, £12,348; Dinua. Forget, £11,908; Isingk\«s, £10,894; Wild Fowler, £9786; while Pradent Kuig's sire, Love Wisely, was credited with £3252. Florizei IT, St. Frusquin. Watchmaker, Desmond, Windfield, Cyllene, Amphion, and Oime were all above the £6000 mark. _ — Master Wootton is making a name for himself as a hor&ernan in England. Concerning one of ]iis latest successes in the saddle an English scribe writes: — "Wootton fesemed to win tha Selling Nursery at Kempton Park by shear dogged determination. At any rate, he gave the impression that he was getting as much out of his mount as many a hevier and stronger rider. A great point, abotu his tiding is that he does not shift Ilia balance when he takes t-p his whip end puts it in-tj use- Many young riders— and old cues tco — when they do this at ones Iwcoiue unsteady, and the result can be of no good to. th* horse." — Mintagon, the Cesarewitch winner, narrowly escaped what might have been a serious accident in Newmarket High street c couple of days before the race. In company with Gullane, he was returning to his temporary quarters at the Golden Lion, and the pair had reached the Rutland Arms, when a barrel of beer was carelessly discharged from a dray, and it felJ in front of the passing horses. Fortunately, Mintagon stood perfectly still when checked by his rider, and the barrel just missed him. On the other hand, Gullane, considerably startled by the occurrence, plunged across the road and dashed into an approaching cab, miraculously escaping a fatal iiijurv. — There is seme doubt as to which i 3 the horse of the century, but there is no doubl that Po°cidon is the equine of the hour, and that has beer, responsible for the Sydney Mail issuing a fine double-page picture of the son of Positano. The picture is by the pencil of the English artist Douglas Fry, and 'ho colt is depicted with Clayton in the saddle, and walking past the Flemington gTand«taucl. Both artist and paper deserve prai.'e for the mutual effort which produred the pictuiv It is full of life, but unfortunately marred by tho fact that the cannon of tho colt's off" foreleg, with which he is leading, is too short and out of proportion with his other lew. — The W.A. correspondent of the Australasian . tates that the biggp&t winner in (.hat pit* over Poseidon was Mr A. Geary, the W.A.T.C. handicapper. He invested £5 on the cot for the A.J.C. Derby, and then followed him all through ~*ke Caulfield and .Flermngton campaign, netting in all govcrui thousuudo. In New Zealard tho biggest winner was probably the well-known fieldor Mi J. Lo'ighlir. Prior to the Caulfield Cup Mi Loughlin assured tlu v.riter that that lice and Ine Melbourne Cup was a fairly good thing for the Positano colt. He was u:uch jjuprestc-d by what he saw the colt do at Raudwiok, with Ihe result that he had <\er .<, century on the son of Positano each twae he started — The rfvdnoy mare Xoreen was heavily backed for the Melbourne Cup on the mgLt before the race, when she touched 5 to 1. This (says "Terlinga") was a faiae price, and whs due to a backer ha\-ing £10,000 to 10s the quadruple— Maximise (Epsom), So'ution (Metlopohtan), Poseidon (Caulfield Cup), and h'oleen (Me'bourne Cup). The fact that the covering up of this bet brought Xoreen to 5 to 1 shows how puny are the " leviathans'" of to-day in comparison with the Jce Thompsons of the seventies and eightaea. Surely ''Terlinga" would not debar a man from hedging a £1 0,000 risk — particularly when it was represented by Noreen, who on form held a winning chknee m the Melbourne Cup. — The stallion Orioa died in Hungary shortly nl'/er his arrival from England. Ho was the son of two Derby winners (being oy Bend Or out of Shotover), and wae foaledas far back as 1839. At the last Newmarket July sales, when Mr J. H. Musker offered his entire* breeding stud, Mr Luczcznbacher bought him the same afternoon wlibk the il'faVod Flying Lernnr wae eecured on account ' of the Hungarian Government, wilh Admiral Breeze and Oheveninp: as companions. Of '• this piounsing lot, only tho two last-named remain to the advantage of breeding in Hun- ; gary, n« both Flying Lemur and Orion died ! without having covered even, a single mare. Orion -was related to the Auckland stallion ' *Oblttrauo. who was got by Orville, a son -of ' Ormonde, out of Shotover. — There is reason to believe that the cham- 4 Pion pf.cer Ribbonwood is a sire of speed, as all 1 hi«s stock arc held in h : gh estimat on by their owners. A gentleman who has priced pome 1 of them stated to the writer that one of the J Wildwood horse's stock is valued «vt oCOsovs, '■ another pi 400sovs, and others vmry at from ' 230sovg lip-ward's, whilst there 13 one which it < is impossible to buy Two offers of 1300gs i and 290Gg& were recently refused for Ribbon- < wood, and th«t gentleman alluded to above : state* that if the horse was brought back to i this country he could,, by meru of the stock he '

baa left, commaad a fee of 30gs to 4Og9k. Ribbonwood was not very well patronised when here, and what he has left has been mostly out of manes which had little or na claim to breeding or good records. — The Willianistown Cap went to Ellis. It. was » grand race, Ellis "only winning fey half a neck from Czarovitch, who should (according to "Goodwood." in the Melbourne* Argus) havo won easily, but Bullock did not ride him v good race. Ellis is a New Zea-land-bred colt "by Hotchkiss, and is trainecl at Caulfield by F. Mtisgrave, who has always had a, good opinion of him. In the Derby Ellis ran fourth, while in the Melbourne. Cup it now transpires he was badly interfered with at the back of the course by Delaware when going well. Circuit was favourite at 4 to 1 fee the lace ci the croeninn of the btitting. but odds of 8 to l" were offend against him at the finish. Proceeder was the favonrite at the word "Go," and he ran a good race, being a- close third. —In a- recent issue of the Paris paner The Jockey there appeared & letter from th» breeder (Count Diiugar) of the Menneval Stud declaring that the betting question had become & vital one owing to the "slump" remia.rked at the yearling sales at Deauville. Count Danger remarked thit, although son» gocd prices were realised for the best lots submitted, youngster* who under other conditions would hare fetched from 50 to 250 sovereigns hardly brought an offer, and "considerably more than half of them remained unsold." He attributes this state of things to the absence of those buyers whose lacing budget was to a certain -extent dependent on the money won in the ring. Brood mares, ho says, are quite unsaleable, and there has been a falling off of some 3000 mares in the. subscription fists to the Government sires ai> the two leading depots. —Mr Geary, who handicaps for both the Perth and Kalgoorlie- Racine Clubs, andl whose remuneration from these wealthy clubs and from his stipendiary steward's fees must approximate to £2000 per p,nnum, would appear to have incurred the displeasure of tbs " West Australian Breeders', Owners', *rd Trainers' Association, for that body has, it is said, forwarded to the ruling authorities a petition asking for another gentleman to b« appointed in his fltead. In portion of the petition it is started that Mr Geary (who was formerly assistant to Mr Daly, the A.J.C. hcndioapper, Sydney) has railed to give anything like genencl satisfaction to owners and! trainers in his adjustments, «nd in his dual capacity of stipendiary steward has engendered ond stirred np considerable etrif* between the various racing clubs «nd the members of the anaocia>tioai. — The London Sportsman, -writing on October 6" of the Australian jockey, says: ■Wootton. the successful light-weight," who added very materially at Kemplon Park an October 5 to his reputation, reminds regular racegoers very forcibly of Johnny Befff, when he first began to ride in England. He is like him in physique; he ia regarded as a. wonder for his inches; he is being nurde. the target of the snapshottara ; he is being lionised by the crowd; and, more important than anything else, m a business sense, the similarity is further demonstrated by tha fact that he is- riding a remarkably higH percentage of winn*rs. The resuH is that ns has aS once attracted a big following among the speculative puWic, ana signs are not wanting that anything he may ride in th« immediate future will start at a rather fa'ls* price. Ho got home on aloto 1 winner on October 5, but this may not occur again for a time. Meanwhile the popular answer to the familiar query, " Wbat'll win?" will b© What is Wootton riding?" » — English jockeys are kept busy throughcut the 3<rt-rmcii7g season, but, taking all tig year round for it, they have it comrmrttivels! easy time compared with leading 'American horsemen. For instance, up to the lirafc woek in September no less than 16 American jockeys haa ridden 400 times or over, the lad with the greatest number of mounts to his credit being W. Miller, with 962, out of which he had scored 256 firsts, 212 second?, and 131 thirds. However, -n the matter of winning peiceirtage dp was beaten by Kicol, v.ith 254 wins for 767 rides, and Radtke, with, ZB4 wins for 668 rides. Other jni-kcys prominent in Ui3 list were D. Austin, 732 mounts, 118 wir.s; Scwell, 693 m<mnts, 165 wins; E. Robinson, 678 mounts, 117 wins: Aubnchon, 615 mounts, 107 wins; and Koerner, 602 inounkj, 91 wins. The foregoing will chow that one? a jockey takes the fancy of American owners he is not left with nmdt spare time on his hancl.s. Miller, for iiistanoc, had been riding at tho rate of (excluding Sundays) nearly 4£ race* a day for eight months. If leading American jockey* occasionally pnt up indifferent displays towards the end of a reason, it is not surprising, as from overwork in the saddle they must become thoroughly stale. — A very sporting match has been brought of£ at St. Petersburg between two sons of Galtee More, one being the four-year-old Galty Boy, the property of M. Lazareff, and the other Gamouraby, the property of the Imperial State Stud. The Former had won the Moscow Derby, while the latter had worn the Emperor's Prize, and it >va« arranged that there should be a match between th» two ever a course of a mile and five furlongs. Galty Boy being ridden by the negro jockey Wmkfield, who is attached to the itab'.e and Gamouraby by the principal Russian jockey. Tho latter won easily by three lengths, und on the strength of that petform9ne& tho Government has decided to run him Jiext year both in Prance and England, so as to gain rome idea as to the coinfJarative quality of the Russian thoroughbred. Gamouraby is described as being a dark bay cult, rather high on t^** leg, but having* magnificent lwea. and calculated to make a very fine horse when he has furnished andf let down. It is singular that the Imperial Stud, aiter having paid 200,000 roubles (£20,000) for Gallee More, should havo sol£ him again fcr 130,000 roubles to the German State Stud, :>nd this just when his stock were carrying all before them. — The Special Commissioner in the London Sportsman writes : — "Mr Henmng has sent Rouge Croix to AußtraUa, and the good-look-ing son, of Bend Or *uul Dame Agneta wilt stand at Mr Eve red Browne's atud at Colac, iv Victoria. Uji questionably at the end of bis two-year-old season Rouge Croix was a fust-class colt, and iv size and general character it has been often noticed that he resembled Ormonde, to whom he is very closely related, as las dam beings in the Macaroni aud Agnes combination to make up with Bend Or — breeding almost identical with that which we find in the wonderful son. of Bend Or and Lily Agnea. Dame. Agneta, is herself , a lialf-siatnr to that very good horse St. Arigelo, and though ehe is- but nine years old she has already produced Saucy, one of the best of our three-year-alds, a* well aa Rouge Crouc. That the last-named will br very successful in Australia there, is every iwson to expect, 'for he has. commanding rize, splendid, bioad, and b» looks all ovav like *. prospective sax» of winners. I cannot call to mind that there is any sialliou of th« Agnes family ia Australia or Kew Zealand." Obligado, who has been shifted- to Auckland, is rich in Agnes blood, and if mated with mares of the St. Simon strain should do «■!>' in his new liomt,

' — One of Rarey's most sensational achievements when he came to Europe in 1858 was to tune a. stallion named Stafford, in Paris. Stafford vie a coaching sire six years old, and ho stood for service at Cluny, or, xather, ir&a offered for service-, as he was so- vicious that nobody could get near him, and for ayear hod been closely confined to his box Rarey omitted the precaution of gagging tho horse with the thick wooden bit used for that purpose, and the result was that Stafford caught him by the shoulders while the .trainer was handling him, and was only jtrriven off with * pitchfork. Biting and striking with the forelegs were Stafford's favourite aneons of offence. Earey spent an hour and in-half- alone with the horse, and at the end of the time rode him into the riding school in an- ordinary snaffle. "The apjpearance of the horse," we are told, "was completely altered; he wa* calm and docile. His, docility did* not seem to be the result of fear or .constraint, but of perfect confidence. The -astonishment of the spectators -was increased when Mr Rarey unbridled him, and guided him with the motion of his hands as easily as a trained circus hor.se." After -this Stafford was ridden by a groom, and -went equally well. At the first attempt Jtarey succeeded in putting him in harness -with a mare, though he had never had Ilia iiead through a collar befoie. / — The stewards of the South Canterbury Jockey Club had a shorthand note taken of the evidence heard in explanation of Savoury's running at Timaru, and it appeared in a local paper's report of the meeting, as follows : — " Only once were the stewards called together this being after the Jockey Club Handicap, when the owners of Savoury, Messrs Nettl-efold and Price, were asked to explain the difference in form shown by theii liorse on the two race days, Savoury not getting a plae in the Timaru Handicap of the first day, while Thursday he annexed the big race of the day very easily. The owners usured the stewards that the horse had ibeen run "straight" both days. ' They said "(that he was- an inconsistent horse, in that | {some days he would gallop, while on others I ffce would not, and added that on the first day ilia rider had complained aa soon as he 'came in that Savoury seemed to be affected iby the dust, and would not try after he reached the straight. The owners said they >3»d' tekeo the horse to Australia, and had tacked him to win a heap of money on several occasions, but his win of yesterday waa the first win Le had had for the past two years. Mr Price added that he believed the run |on- the first dey had done the horse good, ■nfl lie waa certainly in better form jeirtertfcjr than on Wednesday. There *r«s so Evidence of inconsistent running, and the ■towards unanimously decided that the explanation, briefly given above, \nls entirely satisfactory." — "Pilot," of the Sydney Referee, writes : —"Occasionally an owner gets bo much •wrapped up in a horse that- he will refuse more for it than what he knows to be ita value. Just at present R. W. Pettsrson has treason to congratulate himself that he did not let sentiment tun away* with him in regard to Solution, and that, after winning » lot of money wit& her in Sydney, he seised the- opportunity of selling when a big price was forthcoming. For he/- new owner Solution h«s won a couple- of weight-for-age x*oeff,, but as in all probability the prizccnoney and whatever bets he may have landed Hid not nearly cover what he dropped over iwr in the two Cups and the Flying Stakes, it is fairly safe to assume that she now z«preeents an expenditure of £5000, which -mil take a lot of recovering, as the mare is •bound to get plenty of weight in handicaps, mnd in ir.f.a. races from a mile and a-half upwards, she will find Poeeidon a, stumbling t>lock. When Solution won the^Metropolitan many were of opinion that, although she apftesred tc be going so well within herself, she could scarcely have travelled any faster it anything had been able to tackle her juet «t the end. Seemingly they were not so far out, as she was unable to raise much of * straggle when Poseidon came at her in ■the ' Caulfield Cup, while in the Melbourne Cup ihe was in trouble as soon as called upon. No importance attaches to her Flying Stakes defeat, as she was palpably knocked cut by her Cup effort, and) though at weigh I-for-age she is not equal to Poseidon, she is probably the be»t of the oider division on those terms up to a mile *nd three-quarters, U sot two miles.

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Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2750, 28 November 1906

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2750, 28 November 1906

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