Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE GRAND PRIX DE PARIS.

The victory of the Carhine colt Spearmint in th& Grand Prix de Paris, ol lOOSsovs, confirms his success in the Derby, and Dilloi. [who rode him in France) has

the following to aay about the race: "I got to jrtuna early m the morning, and went straight to the course 10 ride cipearmmt in ins work. He had a steady gallop about a. mile and a-nali. WateT Chute went with nim. IDe went well, but did not please me so much as Jie did the next morning when I rode him a canter. He seemed to be sort of looking- about him, stopping, and that. Next morning i rode him a center about six furlongs. I thought he was certain to win alter that; he strode out so well, went with a lot of dash. I motored out with Griggs from Paris to Longcnamps in th& afternoon and felt pretty confident. -YlaibsT and i oressed side by side. A feLow came- in and said he had backed Spearmint, but had hedged his money ' because Dillon was riding and Maher wasn't.' He said he didn't know Dillon. He was talking to Maher, and Danny let him go on. We weighed out, and" I drew No. 3. When I was going to get on Spearmint he lasned out at the people, and instead of kicking them nearly kicked me. There was a big crowd round. When I roda Ypsilanta out there they got me on the outside, and never gave me a chance to get anywhere. I wculd have liked to ride my own race, as I do in England, but I never had a chance. So on Spearmint I made up my mind to get to the front if I could without bustling him or anything. As it turned out, all the jockeys rode as fair as possible — bnt onco bit twice shy. Cantering to the post, Spearmint went very welL I commenced to like him more. They don't have standing starts in France like we do here. In most races the ioekeys canter up to the gate, but in this race the horses wore close up to the gats when it went. up. It was a real good start. I was second en the rails going round the first turn. There was a good chance of getting through there, and I sent him to the front. I was sitting still on him all the way- up the hill about a neck in front. Corainar round the top turn into the straight I gave him a little easy. Somethings was coming up on the inside five furlongs from home, Spearmint hanging a little «tway from the rails because of the crowd, so I had to nick up my whip to make him keep his place, but I did not hit him. I shook it *t him, and he did what I wanted. Then Brisecoeu-r came and challenged, and we raced all the way home. Spearmint stuck to it, but I felt a .ittle uneasy a furlong from home. I had to hit him there. I hit him three times altogether. Be stuck to it very gamely. He is the gamest horse I think I ever was on. When, we were six strides from the post t knew I had got them beat. He was going on, and others were stopping. I think the farther we had had to go the farther he would have won. Spearmint, I am sure, is a rea-lly aood horse. So for a» i know, Spearmint has never been tried with Pretty Polly. He had a gallop with her one morning, when Templeman rode Spearmint and I rode Pretty Polly, but neither Templeman nor I was weighed out, and the horses were not stripped. It was a good pace gallop, but not a triaL" Dillon, when told that it had appeared in print that he had bf>en obliged to use his whip on Pretty Polly in this " trial," answered: "I was sitting still on her all the time in this gallop, and was always in front. Mr Gilpin never said anything to me about a trial, and so far as I am concerned it was no trial. Pretty Polly was never out of a canber. She never has been out of a canter when I have ridden her, either in a race or at home."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19060808.2.113.6

Bibliographic details

THE GRAND PRIX DE PARIS., Otago Witness, Issue 2734, 8 August 1906

Word Count
733

THE GRAND PRIX DE PARIS. Otago Witness, Issue 2734, 8 August 1906

Working