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TALK OF THE DAY.

"By Sestoibi.. THE NATIONAL MEETING.

If on© can judge ~by the betting market returns, the «cceptanoes for the principal events to be decided a* ifoe C-J.C Grand National meeting chouM be numerically strong, as the quotations show that several 1 .horses in each race have been backed for 1 good money. Another thing is -that the divergence of opinion, as furnished by the suj^iort accorded the different horses, apparently suggests that the races are fairly open, and, consequently, may be expected to provide sport worth witnessing. ' Kiatere has been freely selected as the first leg in doubles, and Sol, Slow Tom, Eurus, Ph&eUmtle, Irish, -Swimmer, Banana, Bon. goa, Baritone, *nd others, not forgetting old Pipi, -have been coupled with such as Kremlin, Exmoor, Shrapnel, Cavalry, Prospector, Bkck Reynard, Tiroie, *.nd several others. The Winter Cup selections are also by no means -confined to a, few names, aad there is apparently a. good prospect of large lields being «eea^ under silk in the races named. A payment is due on Friday for the Welter Cup, Hurdles, and Steeplechase, and on the same date -entries close for the balance of events on the programme. THE WINNING 2JST. The well-luiown tuTf statistician 'Tentagras;h" i« one© more out with his figures for tie season which" was brought to a. conclusion with the termination of the Wellington Racing Club's meeting. The list of winning owners is headed by Mr G. G. Stead with £10.800 to his credit, and then, at a drop of nearly half this amount, coaaes Sir -George Clifford with £5747. Mr E. J. Watt won £4662, and the Hon. J. D. Ormond's colours captured £3735. Otago sportsmen are headed by Mr St. John Buckley, whose horses a«nexed £2054, and it will bo a matter of general satisfaction amongst sportsman that such a welcome addition to our ranks of owners has won a. fair amount of prize money apart from the pleasure of seeing his colours carried! to the fore. The Hon. George M'Lean's stable annexed £1202, and this amooot is by no means large when it is placed alongside the cost of keeping a stud and training stables going. However, there are some promising horses in the stable, and next year a better return may be expected. Mr af'Lean has said some good horses out of his stable m the past, or his position on the list would be higher. Mr J. Ellis's stable was out of form in the latter part of the season, but still £819 was garnered, in ©takes during the year. "Mr J. Brett vion £716, and it is probable that his name will be missing from tie lUt next year, as it is «.nnouneed that his colours are to be fcl<k<3 up. Mr J. Jeffs has won £608, and there is a big drop before the names of Messrs W. T. and L. C. Bazlefct are met with £214 to their credit. Apart from that, howo\er, the senior member of the partnership has won £222 10s in his own name. The Messrs Hazkfct have not achieved a proportionate amount of stakes this year when the sum is compared to the strength cf their team, but next year they should (\o better things. Mr J.R.Mackenzie won £213, and the Messrs Teschemaker's colours were not out very frequently, but won £211 ; but Mr R. 'O. Campbell, who has a fairly large team going, is unforto)na.t<>ly low on the list with £I€s. He has been a good buyer during the -<-ear, and gome of his -purchases should recoup their expenses n<?xt feaecn. t , Ttap list of winning stallions is.headed by Multiform with £11,634 to his credit, and he is followed by Slfpniak with £9368. The margin between thi« brace of Musket's descendants would read in favour of the latte*- if the former's Australian suecessees were not included in the list. Soult is third with £6517. Beaton Delaval next with £5932, and then come Clanranald with £5335 Merriwee £*OZ3. Sou- wester £3625. The OnWr £3541. St. l>g*r £3315. Gold Roef £3184. Medallion £2927, and Sir Lancelot £2659. Noctuiform heads the list of winning horses with £3747. and Isolt, ihe handsome- daughter of Noctuiform's sire, comes next with £2699. Room-erang annexed £1890. and those which hay«» ako won over £1000 a^ Achillas £17*5, JTirrw*muir £1705. Pa-ritutn £1680. Purtv £]3?0. NifJUfall £1328. Cuneiform £1200. Sol £1077 10s. Lyrist £1060, Landiock £1040, and Solution £1005. A SUCCESSFUL SPORTSMAN. Many a man is dubbed a lucky and successful sportsman owing to the fact that he occasionally or frequently wins a big race or two. but if the wins were counterbalanced by the cost and up-keep of a largo team of horses in training, together with the expenditure incurred in maintaining a fairls- large stud of horses, ih© gilt on the frames would probably prove to bo very thin even if it were not mor^apparent than real. Many of our leading owners are not in the racing game for money, but are quite content if their participation in the sport does not make too big an inroad in their incomes. For instance, the writer hae heard that the Hon. J. D. Ormond would not deem it unreasonable if the pleasure of seeing hie colours carried during a season does not exceed £3000 or £4000. Many of our owners when looking ahead would probably be averse to an outlay of that amount, but being sportsmen, they would i not give a very deep growl if the year ended with that amount on the wrong side ! of the book, provided the season furnished a lair amount of sport. In this island are fortunately such men as the Hon. Geo. M'Loan, Sir G. Clifford, and Messrs Palmer, Buchanan, Dalgety, Rutherford, Reid, Pync, Grigg, Campbell, Tesehemaker, Elworthy, i'riedlander, and St. John Buck'ey, in addition to others, who arc quite content with a season's sport even though it costs a bit of money. In the fulness of time it is to be hoped that €<ach of them w;ll have a, lnclcr turn from Fortune's wheel, but it is doubtful if they will ever emulate the success achieved by Mr G. G. Stead, the well-known Canterbury sportsman, whoso colours have been successfully carried on the principal racecourses of Australasia. liook- | ing back through the rt*coTds of turf history, it is found that since the season 1890-1, Mr Stead has won something like £34,000 in prize money, and prior to this amount passing to the credit of the yellow-and-black colours, such horses as Pallificr.

Melinite, Strowan, Gipsy King, Mata. Betrayer, Sextant, Lebel, Beresford, Scots Grey, Trenton, Bombshell, Russley, Lochie!, ! Geraint, Maxim, Rose Argent, Medallion, Trump Card, Le L<oup, and Marion probably extended that sum to over a century of thousands. The goddess of fortune may have been coerced by judgment to weave many a, lucky strand in the yellow-and-black colours, and caused them to ■win where otherwise they would nave lost; but beyond the spoile of turf war Mr Stead has made se-vexal sales of horses which read profitable to that gentleman. Without the class of goods there -would of course have been no noteworthy sales, and the big figures were paid because the horses were deemed worthy of acquisition by other sportsmen. Noctuif orm is supposed to have cost his new owner SOCGgs, and Maxim sold at 4000gs, whilst an array of high-class horses such as the following lot must tot un a tidy tow of figures if their sale price could be published. Trenton. Menschikoff Altair, Uniform, Martian, Multiform, Gold Medallist, Nightfall, Bloodshot, King Log, Evelyn Wood, Machine Gun, Grand Rapids, Cuneiform. Bombshell. Golden Lily, and others -would probably bring Tiis 6ale list up to about £50,000. That is to say, Mr Stead's receipts from sport must be about £150,000. But w-hat he has expended in expenses and unlucky purchases can only be gue&sed at. He has always been a liberal purchaser and importer of high-class blood stock, and it is but scant praise to say that his position at the head of winniiig owners is well deserved. Mr Stead has during the season just expired won £10,800 in stakes; but this amount has been exceeded twice in the past. In IPOI-2 he won £12,325, and in 1804-5 the sum of £11,456 represented the cash value of his horses' victories, -whilst he has li€aded the list of winning owners no lew than six times during the past eight seasons. A RACECOURSE TRAGEDY. By this week's mail from Melbourne particulars of the tragedy which occurred at I'lenriington, where a '"welslwr" was kitted to death, <-*i»e to band. It appears that at tha conclusion of the Grand Steeplechase, won by Decoration, a man v.'ho had been making a book upon that event, attempted the old trick pojjotjq peg oqM asoq} J>tnqsiaM jo the winner. The crowd, incensed by oftrepeated operations of the same nature worked off upon them by such swindlers, rush-exi the "bookmaker" andi his clerk shouting horrible imprecations and threats of violence. Excited crowds are common at Flemingfon, and, as a rule, lit tlo notice is tak«n of them, but it soon became apparent that this howling, frantic, cursing mob that surged across the flat in tlie wake of a man running with despair d-epjcted on his face was * mob that meant mischief. As the hunted man ran, the crowd tearing after him grow till thousands joined in the hunt. The "welsher" was a big, heavy fellow, rcd-faoad and plainly scant of breath, and as he ran he dodged and ducked through the throng That sought to detain him, and struck him as he passed. Knocked down once, the foremost ranks of liis pursuers reached him, and the sounds from the pack that swarmed over him wore horribly wolf-like in their viciousness. He was up again, a-nd the burly form forced its way out from the crowd, and, panting and stag-g-ering, stumbled on to the fence close to the outer carriage paddock. leaning against it,/ the man faced his pursuers, and appealed for mercy. "I <ant pay you, for I haven't tho monov," lie said. "Give me a chance, boys !" A rain of blows was the answer, and erica of "Kill him!" "Deal it out to him!" wei'a rai&ed One man, who is said to have inve=icd the sum of Is with the dofaultc, but whose ferocity was ouf of all proportion to the amount of his paltry loss, climbed over the fence, and, dealing the defenceless man a terrific blow on tho back of the neck, felled him to the ground amid the merciless feet of his mad and cowardly assailants. Here ho w-as kicked and beaten while the crowd fought over him like dogs. The end soon cameInsensibility relieved him, and death mercifully followed qui.oklv. The horror of the iviholo dneacrful incident ia relieved by two or threo rajs of true humanity a-nd courage gwpplkd by the pluck and love of fair play of several young men, two of them wellknown boxers, who risked their lives at the hands of the -ungovernable crowd to save the life of the man who, by the want of moral principle, had caused the uprising that ended in his dreadful death. They floored men right and left, but scores W'?r-e kicking at the doomed wretch on the ground, who had no hope of succour. Wh«n the police forced their way into the crowd tho man was <3oad and nothing remained but to cftrrv his corpse to tho caMialtv room. Th<* post mortem examination made by Dr Brett disclosed the fact that deceased's neck wad broken and the spinal cord lacerated. His nose was broken, and there was much extravasation of blood on the brain. He was actually suffocated by th« blood that rushed down Sis throat. MORE ABOUT SPEARMINT. Spearmint's victory in the English Derby is thus referred to by the Field: — "As to the quality of the field, it is too early to express an opinion, and we shall have to see what Spearmint and Picton do with older horses before any really definite idea can be formed. As the time was a record for the race one is inclined to think that the form is far better than had been anticipated, and no one will be surprised if Spearmint, in spito of his poor two-year-old form, turns out to be a great horse. He is undoubted ly the best colt which Carbine has sired in England, and his breeding- is due in some degree to Sir James Duke, who bied Maid of tlio Mint, and who also bred Wargrave, b\ mating Carbine with Warble. The pedigree of Spearmint contains no Galopin blood, and none -of Hamnton or Bond Or, but Stockwell and Newmin<-ter (the pranclsire and eire of the horses just named) are to be found; and, in fact, Spearmint has three strains of Stockwell. one of Stoekwell's half-brother, King Tom, five of Touchstone, and three of Melbourne ; while he has some BlacUock blood if the pedigree is taken right back. To have a new strain or line of Eclipse in a Derby winner, even if it comes from Touchstone, is most satisfactory, and it is also matter for congratulation that the importing of Carbine by the Duke of Portland has at last been rewarded. Of all the Australian sires brought to England during the lasi dozen years, only Carbine has been at all successful, and his successes have hardly boen in keeping with his great form on the other side of the world. It is probable that the influence of Australian blood will be more felt in the next generation of

thoroughbreds, and it is worthy of note that Carbine had been a dozen years in England before he achieved a classic winner.

" Carbine has two-year-olds, yearlings, foals, and mares in foal to follow after Spearmint, Gingal, Ramrod, and co., and it is quite likely that he may still become a great stud success, •while if this does not happen in his lifetime it is practically certain that his blood will be of great value in the future. Unfortunately, the Derby winner has few really good engagements, having "been apparently entered in accordance -with' the small price he made as a yearling. That Spearmint did not fetch more than he did when a yearling was natural enough, for Carbine had not been an unqualified success since he came to England, and many of his stock which had given great early promise were disappointments -when put into training. Major Lodcr bought this particular colt on his own judgment, having taken a great fancy to him when he looked over Sir Tatton's yearlings; but it is pretty certain that no very great things were expected of him until quite lately. when it was found he could stick so well to Pretty Polly in his home gallops. By the way. it has been stated that a Derby -winner was never bought at auction before, but that is quite a mistake, for Sainfoin was sold at the Hampton Court paddocks, and Sir Tatton Sykes disposed of Doncaster for 950 guineas in 1871. The colt was entered in the catalogue as ' All Heart and No Peel, 1 but Mr Merry, who bought him, did not like the nsume, and changed it to Doncaster. Messrs Burnett and Grant report th« following business on tho GRAND NATIONAL DOUBLE. 1500 to 9 Banaiia and Bataana, 1500 to 7 Rcmgoa and Tirole 1400 to 2 Mauazona a-nd Faro, 1300 to 6 Swimmer and Welbeck, 1000 t> 28 Kiatere and Krem.in. 1003 to 25 Swimmer and Cavalry, 1000 to 12 Slow Tom and Asteroid- 100 D to 1 Manazona aj*d lirole. 800 to 2 Q'swhi'ti and Prospector, 800 to 2 Narcissus and Tircle, 700 to 17 Eurus and Shrapnell 700 to 2 Rongoa and Black Reynard, 700 to 2 Pipi and Sardonyx, 600 to 14 Kiatere and Shrapnel. 600 lo 14 Eurus and Kremlin. (500 tc C Enrus and Prospector, 600 to 4 Eanana and Cavalry, 600 io 3 Moccasin and Pushlul, 600 to 2 Baritone and Lull.

J. Loughlm, Dunedin, reports as follows: —

WIiNTER CUP (STRAIGHT OUT)

500 to 20 Aboriginal, 450 to 14 Exm&or, 400 to V> Mobility. 400 to 32 Whakavehi, 350 to 3 Shrapnel Shell, .260 to 7 Polyanthus, 200 to 5 Sir Percival.

G.N. STEEPLES AND HURDLES

1200 to 18 K-ialere and Exmoor. 1200 to 12 Sol and Cavalry, 1000 to 5 Haydn and Kremlin. 1000 to 10* Skrw Tom and Cuiragno, 900 to 3 Banana and Banana., 900 to 6 Swimmer and Kremlin, 800 to 4 Swimmer and Pushful, 750 to 5 Eurus anJ Prospector, 750 to 3 Sol and Convoy, 750 to 3 Kiatere and Convoy, 750 to li Baritone and Convoy, 600 to 2 Banana and Cavalry, 600 to 1£ Comfort and Waiwera, 600 io 1 Hautapu and Black Reynard.

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2732, 25 July 1906

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2732, 25 July 1906

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