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IN A NUTSHELL.

Brisa. Hie dan? of Apollocloris, has foaled a colt to Stepniak. Inquirer : Hackness teat a, field of 31 in ihe Cambridgeshire of 1882. —Y. Cotton has been engaged to ride Machine Gun in the Stewards' Handicap. — Sir George Clifford has sold the Clanranald stallion Glenogle to a Lixmsden buyer. — The Elderslie stud is sending tip a parlicalarly fine batch of yearlings for this year's ' sale. — On the first day of the Doncastar yearling sales a Carbine colt realised 1650gs under the hammer. — A complimentary ticket for the New Zear land Cup meeting is to hand, and acknowledged with thanks. i . r— A printed copy of tho nominations far the

C J.C. spring meeting is to lianJ, and acknowledged with thanks. — The double Koctuifciui and Munjeel has bc^en backed freely during the past week id' Ibe Cup aiid Stewaids". —An oftei of 300sovs was recenfy refused for Brighton, who co=t 30eo\= ->\lien he lust jemed the Ellis Bros.' stable. Complisjieiilary tickets for tho Taieri Amateur Turf Club's spring m-etmg tue to hand, and acknowledged with thanke 1 . Amongst the starters at Gore last week was a, Muskapcer gelding named Gusty, who broke one of Ms shoulder blades a few months ago*. — A Cbristehurck telegram states that Mi' Gco. G-. Stead received a cable from England on Tuesday asking him to put a price on Noctuiform. — Cannie Chiel was kicked whilst at the post for his race at the Wellington meeting, and lie- is said to be an unlikely starter at the Cup meeting. — The New Zealand-bred Ascot gelding Sweeper, who has been displaying winning form wcr fences in Victoria lecently, has been sold to go to India. — The Australian jockey F. Bullock, whe rode several good winners whilst attached to J. E. Brewer's stable m England, has returned to Melbourne. — The Multiform, gelding Highland Fling I should get amongst the- winners of the near ! future, as he is now in fairly good ordter, and; appears to be on the improve. — The Winton, Riverton, and Waii-io Racing Clubs have joined in securing the services of Mr T. Perid<?rgast, who fcmiprly acted aa starter to ihe Southland Racing C.ub. — -J. M'Cornb was offered the ride on Machine Gun in tho Stewaids' Handicap, but had to re-fuse owing to his services being required for either Ailf=a or Apollodoris. — The defunct Maribyrnong" mai'3 .Marion was not a great stud .success ppaxt from her Übioduce of Strowaii, but Highland Fling may "be found developing into a useful sort. — Bill Perkins and Apprentice' were strong otdeis for a couple of races at Gore, but failed to realise. The iormer ran a good race, but t>he hitter's showing was very disappointing. "—" — A yearling bioth-er to Birkenhead was sold at the Doncaster sale for olOgs. Thecolt is said to be a better built animal than, the Hon. J. D. Ormond's sire was at the same age. — A couple of smart pacers in Wild Bill and Lexey were amongst the runners at Gore a but although both demonstrated that they have not lest pace, they were done -with after going six furlongs. — The Euroclydon horse Brighton was quite the equine hero of the Gore meeting, andl | captured all before him. He is in fine order afr\present, and should get amongst the winners at Riccarton. — Challaconibe's win in the St.. Leger is said to have been the greatest ten-tip for the bookmakers'ever known in the history of the- race. j His owner refused to take an offer of 10,000 to 700 before ihs race. ■>' — The Castor gelding Ringmaii was seen out a coftple of times at Gore, and pulled up , sound «fter each of his races. He has been a big disappointment since he came sovtb> but should win a race if he keeps sound. — There have been marry rumours during the present, season that the Prince of Wales was about to form a lacing stud, and it is now stated lhat he will start his career on tie hul or. his retuias. from his voyage to India. —At the Wallsend" (N.S."W.) meetiug, heldjust before the last mail to hand loft Sydney; j the New Zealander Levaut finished out of a place in the first day's hurdle race, but won on the second day with the greatest ease. j — The iStepniak— Vaultress gelding Moudjik | ra.ti a couple ol fair races under big weights at Gore, but does app-ear to be ait home under | v/night even after allowing for the fact that his burdens were fairly heavy- for a three-year-old. — The Euroclydon horse Brighton, who has . been displaying good winning form lately, ' cost 30sovs when he originally joined the Ellis Bros.' stable. Jupiter, another fine stake ' earner for the same stable, cost £16 as a yearling. i — During the pafet few days there has been a good deal .of support o.ccorded Nootuifomi I for the New Zealand Cup, and iilie son of j Multiform will see a short price, as there nowj seems every prospect of his being the stable's I re-presemtative. | — Unless there is sotae line rlrying weather it is stated that there is a prospee 4 ; of the Auckland track not being fit to race on this week owing to the 9 Iterations made to the course not having a chance to settle owing to the bad weather. — There was some suspicious displays of horsemanship at Gore, and one or 'two ridora appeared to be between the devil a,i;d the deep £'e?j in their -efforts of trying to lose, and at Hie same time make a display calculated to deceive the spectators. — A couple of St. Glair's stock in Regulator and Juggler were amongst the runners at Gore, and, judging by their form, they appeal to lag superfluous an ike scene. Juggler is out of the King Cole mare Legerdemain, ths dam of St. It<?s and Conjurer. — According to Dame Rumour, Mr G. G. S+ead will attempt to win the "Triple Crown" with. Noctuiform. and if that is ito, the son of Multiform will have to meet something high I class to'" bar his way to success m the New ' Zealand Cup, Derby, and Canterbury Cup. — There was a rumour prevalent in town, that Vladimir had met with an accident whilst running on the second day of the Gor. meeting, but the handsome son of Stepniak, although he did not gain winning honours, pulled up sound and well after each of his t races. I — A writer states time was when trie Victorian Ciub was ci'owded on the ere of the CaulfieM Cup meeting, but at no stage o" ihe filial call were there more ihan 20 people present, and with two or three exceptions they were all professionals, either layers or takers of odds. i — The Gore Racing Club rigidly excluded bookmakers from their meeting last week, but were sportsmanlike enough to make an exception in the case of one who lias frequentlj raced horses at the Gore meetings, and who gave his word that he would do no fielding on the ground. — It is 20 rears since Grace Darling won the never-to-be-forgotten Caulfipld Cup, in which ]6 out of the 41 starters fell at the honii tpixn, and Donald Nicholson, the best light"i 'eight of the day, was killed in the smash up which resulted from the disastrous fall of Saidius and Too Too. — Some of Legerity's stock will probably be seen racing at the goldfieids meetings this I season, and amongst those in work wha were 1 sired by the son of St. Leger and Hazel , is a three-year-old gelding from Cornieello, the dam of The Maltster, and a three-year-old filly from Wild Wav-e. — Challacbmbe, tho winner of this year's St. L3g«r, started at lOVs to 6. Cherry Loss vas favourite at 6 to 4 on, but was reported to be under a cloud beifore the meeting, whiiat Val dOr, who in. all probability have proved: ihe victor, -was prevented from crossing the Channel through bad weather. — The well-known owner Mr J. R. Mackenzie has been seriously ill, but it is pleasing to hear that at latest accounts he was progressing towards complete recovery. Mr

- Mackenzie has been in bad health for some weeks past, and was laid up for a considerable time during his recent visit to Australia. — According to Mr P. H. Heath, the official timekeeper, the first half-mile of the race for the Caulfield Guineas was run in 52Jsec, and the last half-mile in 52sec. The first furlong of the Caulfield Stakes (won by fforah) was' run in ll^sec; the next half-mile in 49sec, and the concluding half-mile in 63Jsec. — Apprentice ran roguishly in each of his Ifaces at Gore, and appeared to be beaten more 'on account of hi 9 dismolination to try than 'from his lack of galloping abilities. The gelding was » strong order for his 'first races, but he -started to stick his toes "in before he Lad traversed three furlongs or fais journey. ' .' —E. Rae, who lost a. leg in a railway acci3ent in Auckland some few months ago, has resumed riding 111 races since his arrival in. AVest Australia, where his father, J. Rae, has • big team in work. Young Rae uses an artificial leg, and ia said to shape very well ..with the substitute for tiliei one he was un- . lucky enough to lose. "{ —A. promising sort of a. gelding 1 named Office Boy was seen out at Gore last week. -Efc is a stoutly-built sort, and shows a. bit cf pace, though lacking any great display of anpscle: Office Boy" was got by The Officer" out of. Heartsease, the - daughter of Dread--mought .and the Leolinua -mars Queen of ( Txumps, the dam of Trumpery. r. — Prior to th© race Grand Rapids wa» ttie

taily hor,s» engaged 'in he Caulfield Cup which ihad bet-n stretched out in-public .'over .the das? ,'t'ance. - Trainers for some years past Jia-ve 'xsxely • tried their horses under "the public, |«ye,-and in the ga-llopa^recorded before ar-New* 'Zealand Cup it is seldom. -a- horse Is- worked kit top 'over a greater distance than a/ mile imd three-quarters. j: — The Tocsiu gelding 1 King Dick paid a splendid dividend! of £44- 15s -when be bolted-; .with the Waiinea Hack" Handicap on .the first <Jay of the Gore ' meeting, and would! have jbeen troublesome to'Rawmore on the second «ky if he had obtained a clear run. • "He was (blocked and shut out three times' in the first ffurlong, and when- he finally got-" clear Raw[anore was well out, and had the race in Ijafety. ■ ' — The, .compiler of the New Zealand Trotiting Stud Book writes to- say that owners of Ibrcod 1 mares ar.d breeders generally are very dilatory in sending along particulars of their fctock which are entitled to inclusion in the ivolume. _ It is .extremely regrettable that | /breeders^ are not alive "to the importance of jthe work, . and some means isihoiu'ld be taken to makeitco.mpulsory on their part to register all stoefe- under one year. 7- Sadie Mac, the best trotting mare seen cut in- America this, season, dropped dead ilaßt month while taking part in- the fourth teat of the Charter Oak Park Stake, at 'Hartford. Her -record -for a mile was 2min -^Jsec,- »nd during the~ present year her wincnings included two- 10,000dbl -purses at Buf-' f alo, one 'of 5000dol at Providence and another jof 1500dol at -Detroit. --V-K is 'stated .that jshortlyt before her'death- an. '■offer of" 30,000d0l was refused for--her. , "* - - ' ' 1 ' \ — Black and Red received a goocTadvertisezoent by the running* of -Red and Black "aiid Brown 'and Black at- the Gore spring meetiag. (These horses started twice," and/ scored each jtime of -asking, and should. -be '"heard -.from again as winners. Red and Black is out"- of •Evening"" Star (dam of Jupiter),' who was got ■by Le Loup out of Tangi II; whilst Vixen, the dam of Brown and Black, was got by the Ijothak horse Dispute, who was brought to Uunedin as a yearling in 1886. — Some- of our manipulators of- totalisator money should/take lessotns front .Mr James, who runs the machine a$ some of our Eouthern meetings. At Gore - last week he attended to three streams of men, and was personably responsible 'for receiving th* £4946 registered in addition to giving out the tickets -to punters making their bets. This is a remarkable feat; paiticularly whan it is pointed out that the, average totaJisaior^ cashier is- very busily engaged when*- he-has* only- -one- -stream o-Mn-vestorsC • • • '

• l — -Black Arrow, who' showed such?promising form at the beginning of the present English season - that .he loomed large in the eye as a prospective Derby winner, has had the* brightness of his shield dimmed by more than one roguish ' display "lately, and derelopment of temper (or common sense) has prevented him from displaying his known galloping ' powers in his recent race. He finished outside the" places -in the Doneaster Champagne Stakes after starting favourite at S to 4 on in a field of eight. — The money ' registered on the totalisator at Gore la3t' week amounted to £4916, or £819 above last year's figures. The increase possibly resulted from the fact -that bookmakers ,wrere excluded from the course", but in making tb comparison between the "two return* it should' ;be pointed out that speculation on tlra two principal events on last 'year's, pro- - gramme wo,? considerably below --what was recorded this yea. 1 :.- Tlie two hurdle events on 3ast year's card also .provoked very Jittle betting. . — The iar-famed . Colliugwood "tote" »was (mentioned .at tha Melbourne Police 'Commission inquiry on Thursday, October 12, Inspector Gleeson, in his evidence, said: —Whi le* 1" .ivas in charge of the gambling prosecution the 'Collingwood" 'tote' was in full swing, I did sot attack it. I was asked to, but told Superdr«tendent Brown my hands were full. I had also another reason. Wren's 'tote' had got •too "strong.— (Laughter.) I had been pretty successful up to that, and I didn't want to spoil my record." — (Laughter.) . • — Excuses might be .made for Vladimir's 'display at Gore, but Brighton beat him. handecmely each time they met, .and the latter is more deserving of praise than the former as of being pardoned for defeat. The racing .■which Vladimir has received should, howbring him on, as he pulled up sound «nd well after each gallop, and he should •be an improved horse at Riccarton. It will flbo remembered, by the way, that Flower o' Clutha beat Vladimir fair and square at Irtvercargill prior to the son of Mist's inerittorious win iv the Great Autumn. —Mr F. Wallis, who acts as honorary starter to the Gore Racing Club, was very successful in getting his fields away at last week's meeting. The horses were invariably .well in line when the barrier was hoisted, and .taking the starting all round the club appear ito have reason to congratulate themselves »n having Mr Wallis's services at their disposal. Mr H. Hay, who acts as honorary gudge, gave his verdicts with reasonable promptness, and it was noticeable that several other officials of the' club * were energetic in their endeavours to make the meeting a success. „ — The well-known Southland horseman Mr W. Jones rode a "couple of winners at" Gore, Jbttt backers of his mount got a touch of heart disease by the narrow margin by which he allowed Brown and Black to win on the first day. On the second day, whilst busily engaged .watching a horse on the outside, he appeared to ,te blissfully "unconscious of danger which lie courted on the rails. However, he may Biave had Ihe correct measure of his opponents, but had M'Comb been able to squeeze ft bit of a rim cb± of St. ReeJ A Mr Jones and.

the supporters of his rider would have been left lamenting. On the question of complaints against handicappors, the English Jockey Club has again drawn attention to th© following notice: 'The steward® of the Jockey Club give notice that all persons who, being dissatisfied with the weights allotted to their horses- m handicaps, make complaints personally to the nandicapper are liablp to a fine All complaiats shall bo madte in writing to the stewards of the meeting, whe/, it they consider them either frivolous or unwarranted, ghall inflict a fine not exceeding £10 on the complainant or, if they think fit, forward the complaint to the stewards 01 the Jockey Club, a,g under rule 11." ! According to tho conditions attached to the Gore pragTaaiflrie, winners of any race alter the declaration of handicaps were liable to be re-handicaprcd, but thera was a. lack of p-roniptitucle iv declaring them which left a j great deal to be desired. For instance. Brighton's penalty was not known until ths nicmiug of the races, and whereas his form at Oaiaaru was good enough for an increase ; of weight in one race, it was not deemed co in. > another. Re-handicapa should be declaied 1 immediately after tlie meetings' which create j the penalties in order that owners should know j wka*, their houres have to cairi-y before they * are shipped to a meeting-. : i —J. R-aa has ridden yuito a- number of | winners latoly, but apparently ia not to ? rid himself of the much-to-be-condemned habit ; of trying to win his race 9 from start to finish. { If his -mount is good euougih. he invariably draws clean away from the field, aoid unneces- \ sarily 'exposes the horse he. is riding. He ! ! has also a habit of pulling up his mounts foo quickly .afteir they have passed the post, and i on- one' or two occasions some of the later -•arrivals have narrowly averted a collision. Apart from -the "danger likely to ensue from a , • harm knocking through being turned with un- j due Jiaste, there is plsnty of risk under ordi- j "iiaxy cErcurri'Stanoesr without creating more by j .turning lound \\hi!,st other horses are galloping paist. . ' ! — The result of the St. Leger wa-s perhaps j the biggest turn-up for the ring in the whole ' history of the race, for although horses 1 have won at longer prices, I ; never remember (says "Robin Hood") so many animals to have been backed at such short rates. At one time or the other Cicero found support at 3 to 1, and Val dOr at 5 to 4, and then, on the scratching of both j being known, odds of 7 to 4 were laid on . Cherry Lass. On the eve of the race, this ! filly was reported to be a- non-stayer, and t Llangibby came to as little as 2 to 1. One j layer had particularly good luck, for having a • very large book he offered the owner of Challa- \ combe the bet of 10,000 to 700 about his ' horse. The big offer failed, however, to tempt Mr Singer, and was -declined. — The proposals by the English Jockey Club - to- meet the question of compulsory disqualification are as follow s: — "If a horse start for j any race "withofiifr' such. Tegistration having been j lodged,, he shall be disqualified, unless it be j proved- to the satisfaction of the stewaida j that the' omission "was accidemta.l, in which! case the parson responsible shall b? fined not I leis^.than ssovs. . If „the jockey 'cannot draw; 'tha proper or declared weight, the clerk of • the scales shall allow him lib. If he then • fails to draw the- proper or declared weight, j ,Tiis horse is- disqualified. No horse shall be ] disqualified for carryiug more than his proper j or .declared weigKt, but his jockey shall be | fined or otherwise punished for carrying more . than 21b over his proper or declared weight, 5 unless the stewards be satisfied that such : excess of weight has been caused by wet." — Many racing clubs have a thorough and complete system, of allowing pressmen doing their meetings 'to personally find out everything they require to make a complete report by sheer force of energy on the part of the pen-pushing brigade. A . notable and pleasing exception is furnished > at Gore, where Secretary Latham immediately -j after a' race, supplied the pressroom with a j card setting * forth totalisator figures, riders, j overweights, time, 'dividends', . etc., . and the 1 judge's placings. This is "en attention, that ' is much appreciated,, and which only requires , the . official distances between the placed | horses to make it the only complete record J that is furnished southern pressrooms. If 5 the judge's distances, between placed horses 1 I were always recorded it would do away with f cne report stating that a horse won by a length and another mentioning a different margin. - j An English writer says: The handicap- j peTS appear to have been driven to make • protest to the stewards oif the Jockey Club about the grumbling of dissatisfied owners i who make complair.ts to them 1 , and a. warning i is issued; or rather reiterated, that if owners consider they have ground for dissatisfaction they are to demand inveutigatioa from the : authorities, and . not growl privately. OX co.urse, the handicappers are men of many friends and more acquaintances, and as, 1 suppose, no set of weights is ever framed that ia-nofc regarded as an outrage by some irate owner, advantage us taken of tho acquaintance or the friendship to bring home to the fiamer 'of the race a sense of his iniquity. 1 well know how -exasperating it is. to find a bad horse with ihe. burden of a good one, and more than once, when I had horses under my charge, I purposely avoided handicappers with whom I was on good terms, feeling that, if I met them, I should break out into expressions of sarcasm or of wrath ; more than once, too, I have transgreased^he rules and personally expostulated and 1 drawn from the handicapper an admission that the protest wa.3 well founded! But as a very general rule it is a mistake to do anything but grin aaul bear it, and run ths horse in order that the fact of his being -.verburdened may bo made evident. — When a handicaprer is wanted, a racing cfinmitteo dloes not pick a clerk out of the club's office for the billet, but selects an experienced racing man. The reason is that a man who has expert knowledge and an opinion worth txarcising is wanted, not a clerk to rely solely on figures and results. Strange to say, however, these expert Jiandicappsrs ara strangely adverse to showing any originality in their work. Horses trained 111 stables which contain or have contained good horses get substantial weights', 110 matter how i.oor their particular form may be. - Even the fate Mr Scarr, who waa less prone to stick to figures than any ether handicapper^ Australia has had, was in, the habit of regarding all I T. Payten's horses as good at the time ihe J. B. Claa-k stable was at its best. Now all ! Seohio's horses get their "iull penn'orth and a bit over. F J.A. has not shown a vestiga" of form fc-r tw>. years, but he is always kept near the top of the tree in. handicaps. Months after Kingkke had gone to the bad he got 9si in big handicap* Apparently ho was made to suffer for being in the same stable as Wakeful, Revenue, and Aurous. 1 suppose (says "Terlinga") it is tJie "safo" policy to keep herpes weighted up to their best form, no matter how ancient that form may be, but I must confess it would be refreshing to see hancliicappers taking a risk occasionally. Especially might this be done- where there is no suspicion of b<u*eg heyja r_i«a t$ hoodv»!i&k 1 hpoicLLcftjDPerfe " *■

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2694, 1 November 1905

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2694, 1 November 1905

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