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RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR.

THE BALTIC FLEET TO SAIL IN JULY. ST. PETERSBURG, April 21. It is semi-officially announced that the Pobieda was not struck by a mine explosion, but was rammed in the confusion that followed the destruction of the Petropavlovsk. The same catastrophe also resulted in the Pallada being finally disabled. April 22. Viceroy Alexeieft's resignation has not yet been accented. April 25. Eighteen Polish Separatists were tried and hanged at Warsaw for an attempt to organise a revolt. Many Polish workmen at St. Petersburg have been arrested in connection with the plot. LONDON, April 18. Immediately Admiral Togo received a wireless telegram from the squadron sent to decoy the Russian ships from Port Arthur the Japanese cruisers Kasuga and Nisshin, accompanying the battleship, dashed forward at full speed. Unluckily the wind freshened, dispelling the mist, and the Russians, descrying the Japanese smoke, guessed the ruse, and headed full speed for Port Arthur, the Japanese hotly pursuing. It was a magnificent spectacle. The Russians were not enticed far enough, and regained the protection of the forts before Admiral Togo was within effective range. After the Petropavlovsk was struck the whole Russian line commenced firing indiscriminately into the water in their immediate front, in order to destroy the mines, the mist .favouring them. The -Times' • correspondent's despatch says that although the concentrated beams of four searchlights revealed every spar and rail on the Kosya Maru, arc! a merciless fire swept around her, the vessel accoinplish'ed her task of laying mines undamaged, -without the Russians discovering her design;;.

After the chase by Admiral Togo, the Russian vessels took refuge in the harbour under cover of the fire frjni the Golden Hill forts.

The Bayan's quick-firers enabled the second Russian destroyer sighted by the Japanese to escape. The Bayan then engaged the cruisers single-handed, until Admiral Makaroff arrived.

All Togo's efforts to draw the Russian fleet on the 14th failed. Not one of them emerged from the harbour. Even the batteries were silent.

A Japanese procession at Xagoya carried 1000 white lanternr; as a tribute to the dead Russians, and also many banners, on which were inscribed, "We mourn for the brave Admiral Makaroff." The military and civil officers delivered speeches. April 19. Owing to the Chinese not permitting foodstuffs to enter Manchuria, Russia has prohibited the exportation of money, foodstuffs, and goods from Manchuria. The Czar has ordered the Baltic fleet to start for the Far East on July 15. • General Kourapatkin reports that Russian outposts occupied the islands of the Lower Yalu within 400 yards of the Japanese, who retreated during the night. The Japanese in Korea consist of 45,000 troops, who are advancing, on the Yalu; 15,000 reservists, guarding the lines of communication; and 4000 garrisoning Seoul. The progress of the railway towards Wiju is rapid. The Times is alone receiving ethergrams. Its correspondent aboard the steamer Haimum declares that he is operating on the high seas in neutral waters, and that his cipher is not recordable on either Russian or Japanese instruments. He trusts that the Powers will insist on Russia confining her threats to her own waters.

The Czar has sent to the Yalu a number of dogs trained to track . the wounded. The dogs are to be furnished with collars containing first aid medicaments and nips of brandy.

Admiral Makaroff's widow has been granted a .pension of 20,000 roubles. Vereshchagin, the famous artist, arrived in Port Arthur on the 12th, hoping tc paint a naval battle connected with his series of pictures entitled the "Horrors of War." He was seen sketching at the moment of the explosion. His body has been recovered. April 20.

General Ma complains that it is very difficult to restrain the Chinese troops from attacking the Russians west of the Liao River.

Reuter states that Admiral Alexeieff is being ignored, except in the matter of civil administration. He was not consulted when Admiral Skrydloff was appointed, and he has asked permission to resiaai his vice-royalty

The Grashdanin and Novoe Vreiaya protest against the piecemeal communication of information regarding the Petropavlovsk disaster. It is feared that much" is still untold. Nevertheless the newspapers emphasise that this is really a land war, and declare that Russian success is certain.

The Daily Mail states that the Grand Duko Cyril was interviewed at Harbin. He stated that while on the bridge of the Petropavlovsk with Admiral Makaroff a deafening explosion occurred, andl the vessel began to settle down by the head. Though scorched, blinded, choked, and stunned, he contrived to get aft and to dive through a port-hole. When he came to the surface the vessel had disappeared. He heard that only 100 seconds elapsed between the explosion and the disappearance of the vessel.

The Japanese are constructing four submarines.

The Japanese destroyed three contact mines which- were adrift. 40 miles off the Shantung Promontory.

The captain of the Russian gunboat Mandjur, which took refuge in Shanghai, was drowned in the Petropavlo'vsk catastrophe.

April 21. St. Petersburg telegrams published in the Berlin newspapers state that the Czar telegraphed to Admiral Alexeieff that the Petrormvlovsk disaster would)

have been impossible if the officers had not shown criminal lack of vigilance. Russian War Office officials assertthat there are 311,000 men at the front. It is not intended to send more at present owing to shortage of supplies. Admiral Skrydloff, interviewed, said he intended to jealously reserve the fleet for a great occasion. He is"" surrounding himself chiefly with young officers.

General Kourapatkin reports that Japanese transports are anchored in the Gulf of Chingtaitozo. Twenty -five vessels are west of Talungaiv and the others near Souchon. All is quiet at the Yalu, though the Japanese are increasing.

Two Japanese who were arrested at Nonni River were hanged at Port Arthur. One declared himself to be a prince of the blood royal.

A Russian circular to the Powers implies that correspondents aboard neutral steamers will be treated as spies if found rising ethergrains to communicate information to the enemy.' April 22. Admiral Alexeiefi demands the withdrawal within tliree weeks of the Chinese troops 20 miles from Mukden. He asks for an immediate reply to his demands. Cossacks are capturing thousands of Tartar cattle in Manchuria without payment.

The Japanese War Office is flooded with applications from volunteers to go to the front. The applicants are of all ages. Many are written in the applicant's own blood. None have been accepted, though if needed they will he accorded the first chance. The officials believe half a million would be easily obtainable.

Fifteen Knights of St. George constitute General Kourapatkin's bodyguard. Newspaper correspondents will be allowed at Mukden on condition that they do not divulge news of the result of engagements or Russian losses.

It is reported that the Norddeutscher Lloyd's steamer' Kaiserin Maria Theresa has been sold to Russia.

Some Finnish newspapers that omitted the Czar's titles when publishing his recent manifesto were compelled to print them in full, including his newest title of successor to the throne of Norway.

The American marines whp were sent to guard the American Legation at Seoul have been transferred to Manila. April 23.

The Japanese are concentrating a' division north of Wiju. They have removed the Korean population. The Japanese have collected the sections of pontoon bridges opposite the island of Mabikhi, and are preparing boats south of the River Pomakua.

Two officers and 32 Russians in boats on the Pomakua exchanged shots with the enemy. Three Russians were killed, and both officers and 15 men wounded, 12 severely.

Admiral Alexeieff reports that Admiral Makaroff, on the night of the 12th inst., until 4 o'clock next morning, watched from the cruiser Diana the outer roadstead.

Lights were seen at a distance. The destroyer Strashni mistook four Japanese destroyers for Russians, but they were recognised at dawn as Japanese. The Strashni fought at close quarters. The commander and most of the crew were killed.

The Admiral describes the Bayan's engagement as an encounter with six cruisers. He adds that the Bayan, on returning, was covered by fragments of shells.

Dealing with Admiral Makaroff's sortie, Viceroy Alexeieff states that upon sighting nine battleships Admiral Makaroff returned and met the remainder of his squadron in the roadstead and reformed. The Petropavlovsk was heading eastwards towards the enemy whei| an explosion occurred on the right side., and then another more violent tinder thel bridge, causing a high column, of gree«

smoke to rise from the foremost funnel, ■she "bridge turret was thrown up, the warship heeled over, and the poop rose, • '-c screw working in the air surrounded o\ fiames. The vessel sank bow downwards.^ Seven officers and 73 men were .saved. He attributed the damage to the Pobieda to a mine which exploded on her starboard side causing her to list "as she re-entered tho harbour. The : Viceroy adds that the crews of the warships 1 retain their high spirits in doing -'their duty. Alexeieif , in a further report, regrets 'that while steam launches were placing mines yesterday a lieutenant and 20 marines were killed through a mine "exploding, under the stern of one of the . launches. - - " Russia has purchased nine German liners for conversion into transports to replace some vessels in the Baltic. It is stated the steamers were purchased ■Briar to- the war. P , •_ . .April 24. „ -Jlhe : Viceroys- of Kirin and' Mukden • bitterly resent -Russia's high-handedness - ikr trying to" induce the Chinese to ".abandon their neutrality. Russian' ramoar's credit General ' : Kashtalmsky with annihilating 1700 ' Japanese, being .one of .three columns crossing the Yalu. A -Seoul telegram states thai- the 1 Japanese are preparing to simultaneously . rush three points, including Port Arthur. • * It. is reported in. Wei-hai-wei that the original Japanese plans of the campaign - "were stolen at Tokio, thus delaying field operations. f ' There are already 84 press correspon- ' dents in Japan, including 36 British and 34 American.

April 25.

.lus&ian strategists Believe General \Karoki is advancing upon the middle reaches of the Yaluy via--Kangge, with Jthefobject of outflanking General Kasntalmsky's position on the right bank ' "of the river. It Trill take the Japanese several weeks to cross the difficult moun- - tain passes. - All roads in. Northern „ Korea converge on Kangge. The occupation will enable the Japanese to watch -Russian operations from Edrin. and Vladivostoek against Northern ' Korea. " An attempt made to destroy the ' cruisers' Jemtchung and Izumrud, in the Neva . Shipbuilding Yard, was frustrated. Four floating mines were discoVered in. the river" opposite the yard. -Two firms are suspected. NEW YORK, April 18. The- Herald states- that General. Attvater, acting commander-in-chief of the 1 Russian artillery, has' disappeared. It is "supposed that he has committed suicide.. Thinking war improbable, he. disobeyed. ~ orders by sending to the Polish frontier instead of to the Far East seven bat- , teries of light mountain artillery supplied by French manufacturers. SYDNEY, April 20. The steamers Birksgate and Oloncurry, sold to Japan, are now loading - produce for Kobe. .

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19040427.2.109

Bibliographic details

RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR., Otago Witness, Issue 2615, 27 April 1904

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RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR. Otago Witness, Issue 2615, 27 April 1904

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