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IN A NUTSHELL.

Field Battery will not be a starter in the [Winter Cup.

A payment do? the New Zealand Cup is due on Friday nest. — Batileaxe has conticusd to please the track-watchers since his arrival at Riccarton.

— The Australian cracks, Ibex and .Abundance, «ie doing good useful work at Randwick.

— The Trenton horse Pbaethcn, Lady Lilliwi'B sire, has been fold to a Wanganui ■breeder. — A copy of ithe C.J.C. programme for the season 1903-4 is to liand, and acknowledged with thanks.

— The Victorian Racing ' Club since it was formed 38 years ago has paid over in stakes £1,131,536. — Zither and Rowlosk lnve been scratched for all engagements at the C.J.C. Giand Rational meeting — Betting is very quiet on the New Zealand Cup, and- is likely to remain so until pfter the National meeting. Medallion, the sire of Achilles, is to stand rnert season at the Tocal Stud (N.S.W.) at a lee of 15 guineas. — A kte Melbourne cable states that Southern Cross 'has b-?en scratched for both jumping events at Caulfieid. — The V.R.C. received during the present year £589S for members' subscriptions, and £2160 in -bookmakers' registration fees. — A Melbourne cablegram states that the New Zealand horse Nor'- West was scratched at 12.3*5 p.m. yesterday for all engagements'. According to the "Special Cominiesioner ' of the Londou Sportsman, St. Simon, Galopin, •tad Trenton have never sired o chestnut. — Battleajce is reported to hs very werl at present, and is looking "better than when he scored at ihe Auckland National meeting. — Th* "English-bred Russley, the half-brother lo Stepniak, is to stand at a fee of 15 guineas in [New South 178163 during the coming eea»ori. — The Abercorn horse, Newry, won the Johannesburg Handicap, ISOOpvs, on June 24, for which h*e went out third favourite at G tol. "

— Since 1896 Ascetic's progeny have won nearly £25,000 under National Hunt Rules in England. Ascetic has been dead pbout six ■years. — Amongat p. number of stallions advertised for private sale by the Sydney stock agents, H. Chisholin and Co., are Cuirassier, Takapuna, «nd Projectile. — Pampero, Red Gaxmtlet, Juniper, and Casque left yesterday for Christchurch, and Vladimir and Glenelg make the journey by io-day's express. — At Ros«hni on July 18 Mr Jack Samuels, who once wielded the metallic pencil here, ■won a race with his niaTe Turquoise, who is a daughter of Lochiel. — Haydn started favourite in last ye.-r's Giand National Steeplechase, and won after a good race. He is likely to repeat the | )el > formance this year. — Kimua (by Administrator) pnd Arapata(by Natator) left at the latter ond of last week in charge of their trainer, R. Ellis, to take part in the National meeting.

— Thunderbolt (Musket— Locket) had two and Zalinski (Nordenfeldt— Frailty) had one ■winning representative at the Adelaide winter meeting, held last month. — The two-year-old sister to Achilles, who has been named Panthea, will bo raced by her owner and breeder, Mr A. W. Nivison, of Tillimby, New South Wales. — The Wellington correspondent of the WitMess wires that the W.R.C. have decided to hold their spring meeting on Wednesday and Friday, October 21 ami 23. ' —If Stepdancer is ever to prove worthy of her relationship to Menschikoff, she should commence operations by annexing the C.J.C. iLadies' Bracelet on Tuesday next. — Tresham ha 3 been awarded lltt llbia the

Caulfield Grand .National Steeplechase, which ( is to be run on Saturday next. Evening Wonder -is in the same lace with 3lb less. 1 — fMr'M'Haffie has a yearling Eisier to Rib- ■ bonwood, which is growing into a highly■promising filly, and her breeder is in hope 3 ; that she will bs a champion in the fulness of |. time. { — Tradewind will probably be ridden in his • engagements at the National meeting by D. j Watt, viho wai usually associated with Moifaa ; when the big son of Natator was racing in this 1 country. — Rock Sand, this year's Derby winner, scored iv the St. James's Palace Stakes, of • 2<oosovs, from, three moderates on the •third day of the Ascot- meeting. He went out at 10'b to 1 on, and won easily. — Four horses who contested last year's C J.C. Grand National Steeplechase will probably be found amongst those who will saddle ■ up for this year's event. These are Haydn, Pipi, Straybird, and Awahuri. ' — The Carbine colt Pom Pom was unlucky to lose the Visitors' Handicap, of 43Seovs, ■ which was run on the second daj r of the Ascot meeting, as he was only defeated by a neck i after swerving badly a few yards from the : post.

— The English colt, William Rufus, a son oi Melton, who was at one time fancied for this year's Derby, at the recent Ascot ms-2t-iug, won over a mile and a-half in the Duke of York Plate, 979sovs, and beat six others in a canter, in 2min 44 3-ssec, on a heavy track.

— An electrip timing clock was used for the first time at the Hurst Park (Eng.) summer .meeting, on June 13, and is stated to be an unqualified succes3. It is worked on the same principle as the clock which is used «t Flemington. — Cruciform Jias won £0370 in stakes during the ihre eseasons she has been racing, and Orloff has captured £2795 during his two seasons' racing, so that there is a substantial balance to the, credit -of the -two flyers who left for Sydney last week.

—W. Pratt, a nephew of the late Fred Archer, has 'ridden four winners of the Grand Prix de Paris. In 1898 he won on Le Roi Soleil, and the other winners he has ridden are Senienclria, Kizil Kourgan, and this year's winner, Quo Tadis. — "Now," eaid the instructor to the newlyjcined cavalry officer, "point out the seat of curb." And when the officer promptly touched the horse under the chin, it was concluded 'that he would not make any great progress in the service.

— Kunstler, winner of the Royal Hunt Cup at A3cot, is a grandson of Deadlock, a mare Captain Machel bought out of a spring cart for £19. The late captain recognised ithe mare as one which had formerly been a decent performer on the turf.

— Sir Rupert Clarke has returned to Melbourne from England. In his opinion Australian horses cannot hold their own with English horses over short distances, but in races over a mile they would stand good chances of distinguishing themselves. — The Wellington correspondent of the Witness expects to see the names of Achilles and Sea Lion ini3Sing from the New Zealand Cup after the nejtf payment, and also states that C. Jenkins has been engaged to ride Lady Lillian in the Riccarton two-miter which is to be decided in November next.

Obligado, the fashionably-bred son of Orviile (Ormonde— Shclover), is advertised to stand during the coming season at his owner's (Mr J. O'Brien) farm at Oamaru. This year Obligado will be limited to 50 mares, aad intending patrons of the horse are requested to make early application for the booking of mares. —An English handicapper said not so long ago that when running to get weight off, the best place for a horse to finish was third, "because the name of your horse then catches our eye. We may be fools enough to assume that he was spinning; and so, unfamiliar with your Uiijutude, we diop him ;ippieciably_."-

— Pipi ran Eesond to Haydn in last year's G.N. Steeplechase, and will meet his victor on 16ib better terms on Tuesday next. Pipi has had the bsnefit of a much sounder preparation for this year's race than he had for last j ear's event, and th?t alone entitles him to a certain amount of respect for the coining race.

— On Juno 13, at Hurst Park, the Victoria Cup, of 2000sovs, was won by an Irish-bred filly named Lady Drake, a daughter of G-alli-nule, and a granddaughter of Robert the Devil, named Tivo of Diamonds. Among the field were the Carbine colts Bistonian (who finished third) and Pistol (who came in amongst the also started). —An Auckland telegram says • — At the anrual meeting of memb2rs of the Auckland Racing Club there was a thoroughly representative attendance, numbering fully IGO. The following were elected for the six vacancies on the committee: — Hon. E. Mitchelson, Messrs L. D. Nathan, R. H. Reid, W. M'Laughlin, John Marshall, and Rich?rd Duder. — 'A copy of the programme of the Asii&urton spring meeting, which is to b? held on September 10 and 11, is to hand. The sum of £525 is spread over 14 events, the principal events being the Ashburton Cup, SOsovs, cn^ mile and three furlongs, mn -en the first dey, and Tmwald Handicap, of Goeovs, on-o mile, which furnishes ithe princinal event on the second day. Nominations are- due on August 24. — On the first day of the Hurst PaTk summer meeting, the valuable Hurst Pork Foal Piate, of 1135sovs, -was won by Week JEnd, a celt by Rightaway (son of Wisdom) cut of Sarnedi (a daughter of the St. Simon horse Louis XIII, who- is now at the stud in New South Wales). Week End and St. Frusquin fought out a great finish, and the former won by a head. Behind the pair were 13 others. — Messrs Barnett and Grant's animal 'publication, "Form at p, Glance, ' containing the placed performances of the horses engaged in the New Zealand Cup, is to hand. It is, as usual, got up in as small a compass as possible, and- as there are several important changes in the S.P. rules followers of lacing should make themselves acquainted with tie innovations which are set out in the booklet.

— A catalogue containing a full list of the blood stock to be auctioned in connection, with the disposal of ihe Sylvia, Park stud is to hand. The sale is advertised to take place on December 31, and included in the list are 33 splendidly-bred brood mares, IS yearlings (the get of Explosion, Seaton Delaval, Phoel.us Apollo, and Cuirassier), and the stallions St. Hippo, Explosion, Seaton Delava!, and San Francisco.

— In England last month the Brighton race stand trustees made a gift of £4003 lo the Corporation for the benefit of the aged and deserving poor, the interest to be distributed at Christinas time. The Corporation recorded their high appreciation of the benefaction, which is only tone of a series, amounting <to some £50,030, the former gifts being represented by Queen's Park, the presentation of 16 acres, part of the -racecourse, and the legal estate in the race-ground. — The colt Duke of Westminster, by Ornre — Gauntlet, for whom- Mr Faber- paid 21,000 guineas as a two-year-old, and who is now a "four-year-old, registered his first win since being sold by Mr Sievier by annexing the Rous Memorial 'Stakes, of 920sovs, w.La., seven furlongs and 166 yds, from Flotsam andßoyal Lancer. The race was inn on the third -day of 'the Asfcot meeting, and Duke of Westminster, who went to the post the outsider of -the trio, scored easily. — The following gentlemen hare b»en elected to fill the official positions of the North Otago Jockey Club during the coming seacon : — President, Mr C. W. Reid ; vice-president, Mr A. Potter; committee — Messrs J. C. Nicolls, E. P. Lee, G. 11. Procter, A. A. M-Master, W. Gardiner, sen., J. F. Keid, W. Gardiner, jun., J. Mnir. H. Orbell, C. Christie, B. A. Glerfn, and B. J. Her.drie; clerk of the scales, Mr A. Bruce Christie; timekeeper, Mr C. Christie; lion, judge, Mr Jasper G. Nicolls. — On the second day (June 17) of the Ascot meeting, the Royal Hunt Cvp — a piece of plate value 500sovs, together with ' ISOOeovs and a sweepstake of 20sovs — was won by Mr L. de Rothßchild'-s Kunstler, a five-year-old sou of Juggler (grandson of Lord Lyon) and the Trap"pist mare Dorcas, 'from 21 othors, including Duke of Westminster, Handicapper, St. Brendan (winner of the last Irish Derby), Eallai:trae, the American colt Aceful (who was sent ever to run in this year's Derby), and several other gcod performers. — Pations of the North Otogo Jockey Club's meetings will regret to hear that Mr M'Kinnon has resigned from the secretarial chair of the club. Mr M'Kinuon was extremely popular with all-those with whom ho en me in contact, and it is to be hoped that he does not intend to withdraw entirely from Ihe racing world. Mr G. M. Procter, the club's treasurer, will occupy the position pro tern., and ss ihat gentleman is thoroughly conversant with racinsc matters the business interests of the club will not he neglected in his hands. — The Americans are fully alive to the importance of properly authenticated horse-breed-ing records, and some time back the American Horse Breeders' Association paid Mr John H. Wallace, of New Yoik, between £20,000 and £30,000 for tho American Stud Book, of which the first volume was issued over 30 years ago. The far-seeiug American breeders wished to make the -Stud Book a national publication, bearing the official stamp of authority, and were prepared to pay liberally for the right of doing co, assessing it at its value to America as a horse-breeding country. — The highest-priced stallions fidveitised for the coming season in Australia pre Sir Foote (Sir Hugo— Galopiu mare) and Haut Brion (St. Simon — Bonnie Lassie), who are both quoted at 50 guineas «. mare. Trussing Cup (Orme — Sterling Love) is priced at 45 guineas. Skopos (St. Serf— Slethoacope), 40 guineas; Orzil (Ayrshire — Merry Miser), 30 guineas ; Simile (St. Simon — Miuii), 25 guineas; Positano (St. Simon — Ponza), 30 guineas; Gossoon SGalopin — Petal), 25 guineas ; Lancaster (Hotchhss — Frailty), 25 guineas; Medallion (Nordenfeldt—Locket), 15 guineas; and Russley (Doncabter — Steppe), 15 guineas. — In the spring of IS65 — the year famous for tho triple victories in Guineas, Derby, aud St. Xiegor of Gladiateur — a gentleman, having won s "pony" at cards, osked the ioser tc back an animal named Planet for him with the money. The horse yon, and the "pony" was run into £300. Of this sum £200 was invested on Gladiateur for the Two Thousand Guineas, and realised £1300; a thousand being subsequently placed on the same horse for the Derby, it produced £0500, or over £8.000 in all What a pity history has not told us why this fortunate individual did not continue his lucky run by supporting the son of Monarque for the St Leger ! — Mr George Watson, one of the best-known figures in the Australian 'racing world, and who acted as starter to the V.R.C. during the greater part of its" existence, recently stated that he thoroughly approved of the starting gate, and further said that the jockeys in Hi* time were the worry of his life. He was obliged to fine them frequently, but could hardly blame them. The excitement and anxiety to get off the mark was almost pardonable, especially with young horses. Now all that trouble is reduced o a minimum. For horses, jockeys, starters, and fairplay generally, Mi Watson maintains that the starting machine is an im- ' mease advantage.

— Count Lchndorfi, who, it is cabled, purchased Ard Patrick for 20,000 guineas, is the first Continental authority on racehorse breeding, and is the author of a remarkably we-11-written and fascinating book entitled "Horsebreeding Recollections, ' which he published in English 20 yeai"9 ago. Tho Count is a German, and an ardc-nt cldsciplo of Bruce Lowe. For many years (s-iys an exchange) he' has had the control of the thoroughbreds belonging to the German Government, and has done nearly all the purchasing for the State for many years. His last big purchase was Kirkconnell, a son of Royal Hampton, and winner of the Two Thousand Guineas in 1595. ' —In connection wiih the Ascot summer meeting, which commenced on June 16, it is wcrt-hy of note that for the first time since ISBO, when the lato Queen Victoria visited Ascot, the gathering was honoured by the presence of the reigning Sovereign, and that a King of England had not been present -at the meeting since 1834, when King William IV was an interested spectator cf the proceedings. During the day the Royal colours wero carried to victory by Mead (who is one of the lung's own breeding, ar.d got by Persimmon out of the Minting maxe 'Meadow Chat) in. the Prince of Wales's Stakes, of 185030V5, one mile and five furlongs, for three-year-olds. Uproarious applause followed the colt's win in'the race. — A rule providing for a "recall flag" in connection with the starting machine has been adopted by the English Jockey Ciub, but on the distinct understanding that the flag is only to be used when a bod' start is caused thiougn the faulty .working of -tha machine. The starter will rot have the- right to Bay a start is not a start if h© himself makes a mistake ; which is very proper, too, as otherwis-3 he could call the horses back every time that, through his own carelessness or inefficiency, they got away on uneven terms. Every startEi is also to be requested to test the machine at least once before each start. Tho question ns to whether the horsss should be started quite close up to the tapes or a little distance off was discussed, and it was decided that it was inadvisable to stand them back from the machine, as under such circumstances they were more inclined' to fidget. and f besides, the riders would give trouble by trying to beat the barrier. — It is somewhat encouraging and refreshing to find that someone ha 3 made a fortune by backing horses, end evidently means to stick to the spoils, and that such a person really exists is vouched for by an American writer, and whilst remarking in parenthisis, ""Go thou and do likewise," I give what I know about it. Our noted plunger (says the writer alluded -to above), Fittsburg Phil (G. E. Smith), is about to retire from the turf, and states that his horses are all for sale, and that in future he will confine hi 3 betting to a few hunc'ired dollars on a-uy race he fancies. The constant strain has played on his nerves, and the doctors have ordered him complete rest. Smith has always been strictly upright in his betting transactions, snd also in the running of his horses, and Hie stones thrown at him axe the missiles of people who are not equallj- successful. He i 3 an es_spntially different type of plunger from Walton, whom \ou remember £0 years ago in England — i.e., if you are old enough. He is a remaikably shrewd and close observer of racing, keeps his own counsel, seldom speaks unless spoken to, and, taken all in all, is au exemplary character. Oiiginally he was a poor boy in a cork-cutting factory, but started in to bet on the races a dollar* or two at a time, -and with such success that he took to backing horses 03 a business. To-day he is piobably worth two or three million-dollars, and sees to it tha,t his parents and others of his family are weil provided for.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19030805.2.121.7

Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2577, 5 August 1903

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3,161

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2577, 5 August 1903

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