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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Shaipshell has been mated with Lorcß Ttosslvn.

— Hewitt rode thiee winners on the second day at Hawke's Bay.

— The experts at Epsom (Eng.) arc not imprcss'jd with Clean Sweep. — Weights are thie for the C.J.C. Stewaids' Handicap on the lOtb inst

— Sequence has 10.4 in the Toorak Handicap, to be inn at Caulfield on October 12.

— A Melbourne cable states that Hautvil'era has been scratched for the Caulfield Cup.

Nominations foi Wmton close to-night (Wednesday) for all the principal handicaps. — There is no New Zealand Cup penalty attached to a horse's win in the Mosgiel cap—W. "Robertson was riding at the Kurow meeting after a lengthy absence fiom the saddle. — The D.J.C. have erected a look-out stand at Wmgatui, to be placed at the turn into the straight. — The victory of Wmdwhistle, in the Wanganui Guineas, is a good advt. for Clanranaid, her sire.

— It is lumoured that Nonette will not make the journey to Christchurch for the New Zealand Cup. — Footbolt has been stiuck out of the Melbourne and Caulfield Cups and the Toorsk Handicap. — Pctrovna, the winner of the Maiden Plate and J.C. Handicap at Kurow, is a full-sister to Tsaritza.

— Barragunda, by Bill o' Portland—Melodious, a lecent winner in Sydney, is a halfbrother to Wallace.

—J. M'Comb will ride Fulmen and Len. King will have the ride on Canteen m the Mosgiel Handicap. - — Mr J. Munro has leased his trotting stallion Experience, by General Tracey, to Mi* L. Thyne, of Waimate. — St. Denis returns from his northern trip this week. The son of St. Clair will probably be given a short spell.

— The Serf broke a bloodvessel at the Kurow meeting when he had a commanding lead in the Spring Handicap.

— A Sydney cable states that Mi Fitzgera'd's Huon Junior lowered the Australian trotting mile record of 2min 20£ sec.

— At Saratogo, New \ ork, an imported English horse called Is? dor, with 9.0 up, won a seven-furlong race in 1.26 1-5-. — The North Otago Jockey Club racirg dates have been changed from the 4th and 5Ui to the sth and 6th of December.

— A Napier telegram states that the racing mare Wraith dropped dead after a gallop on the Hastirgs track last weak. — The AuiPiicaii owner, W. C. Whitney, who v. on this year's Derby with To'odjovski, has six engaged m the Derby of 1903. — The Carbine colt Sandbag v.on a six-fur-loDg race at Hurs < Park on August 23, and eaived the journey out iv lmin 13sec.

— The crack American tiotting stallion Stanboul died ,in August at Orange County, New York. The horse ha>?. a record of 2.7}.

— At Windsor (England) September n;eeting ihe Castle Selling Nursery Handicap was won by Etra-weenie, by Carnage from Lady Halle. — As tlie second liorse receives &15 from the stake in the Hawlie's Bay Spring Handicap Palaver escapes a penalty tor tie New Zealand Cup. — Tht Xcw Zealand j-orsy Clansman, after having been disqualified by the Eoscbsry Park stewaids, in S3'dney, for 'suspicious rtvaning, was advertised for sale

A Melbourne cable reports the following scratohings for the Caulfield Cup: — La Carabine, Boag,. Bea\i Hampton, Carbineer, United States, Maltster, ?rid Sir Leonard.

— Mr E. Gerkins has purchased the thoroughbred stallion Legerity, by St. Leger — Hazel, by Xordcnfeldt— Ouida, and will place him at the services of breeders in the Otago Central districts.

— Ercildoune, by Kendal, who raced in England m the colours of the late Mr W. Wilson, formerly of Victoria, who was killed in action in South Africa, has been sold to go to Buenos Ayres.

— A strong movement is on fcot to form a new trotting club at Timaru. Over 40 names were handed m for membership at the recent meeting, and no doubt a strong club will be sot together.

— The Queensland horse Ohio (full biother to San Fran) has arrived at Melbourne, 'lhe sou of Gozo and Procella is engaged in ths Caulfield and Melbourne Cups with 8.3 and 8.1 respective 1!'.1 !'.

—At Huist Park, on August 24, the Duke of Portland's colt, William the Thnd, defeated Volodyovski and thrae others in the Hurst Park Lennox Stakes, of 2000sovs, and run over a mile and a-half.

— At the Broken Hill Policp Court lecently J. Warren, "head master" cf a gambling school, was fined £20, with costs, A. Walker, "assistant teacher," £3, with costs; and 23 "scholars," £1 each.

— According to "Low's Directory" Ihe fLtsfc thoroughbied foal produced in New South Wales was born on April 29, 1826. On that date Mr Icely's mare Manto pioduced what was afterwards called Cornelia.

— Benefactor, the horse that won the Railway Hack Handicap at Waiigarrai, is a ful!biother to Sympathy, a mare engaged at Wingatui this week. Both horses are by Stepiu^k from Charity, the dam of Barnado.

— Up to dale these horses which have earned penalties for the New Zealand Cup are — Noisette- slb, Okoari slb, and Fashion 3lb. Palaver just misses by a fiver a 3lb penalty for hei wia in the Hawke's Bay Spring Handicap.

— Mi E. S. Sievier's colt Doochsrv, by Milford, won the Staffordshire Breeders' Foal Plate, of 679sovs, on August 20, from 12 other';. The colt by Whittier, from thp Kew Zealandbred mare Engagement, ran third in the race.

— The great pacers, Anaconda and Joe Patchen, met at Brighton Beach (New York) last month, and the former won, cutting out his first heat in 2mm 7£sec and his second in 2mm 3Jsec, which constitutes a record for the track.

— The latest English mail to hand brings news of the victory of Screw Gun in the Harewood Handicap, of SOOsovs, and run over fhe furlongs. The Maorilander started at 100's to 12, and, running the distance in 1.1, beat ten others.

— Mr Jackson Munro has purchased the trotting stallion Experience, by General Tracy from Fanny, by Tribune, for lOOgs." 2Jr Munro also owns G-eneial Tracy, the sire ot Experience. Tribune, the sire of Fanny, is by Tiaducer from Azucena, by Towton.

— A-t the V.R.C. meeting the chief event was the October Stakes, which was won bjr Haymaker, with Grasspan second and George Frederick third. Grasspan led into the straight, but Haymaker swept away in dashing style, winning by five lengths. Time, 2min lOsec.

— Two thoroughbreds were shown at the horse parade on Thursday last, Lord Hosslyn anc! Casket. The latter was placed first by tlit judges:. Berlintme, by Berlin — Wee Lass, was awarded first piize in the tiottmg stallion clags, anc 1 George M. Patchen gained second honours.

— Bistonian, the English colt by Carbine — St. Bees, continues his winning career during the present season. At the Stockton meeting on August 22 he won the Stewards' Handicap and beat &ix others. Bistonian carried 8.11 and ran the distance of the lace, one mile, in lmin 39 l-Ssso.

—It will be of importance, says the Melbourne Leader, to these interested in Tattersail's sweeps to know that the opinion of Ministers appears to be that even after the Postal Bill is passed its provisions will not be enforced against the sweeps before next month, or until afteT the Melbourne Cup. —At Auckland telegram states that r.t a meeting of the Auckland Trotting Club the question of adopting the system, of paying out totalisator money on the first and second hoTses, also that of allowing bookmakers to bet at the club's meetings, were discussed, and both proposals negatived by a large uaa3OrL Sirdar (Splendour— Ellerdale) has been Bold for £500 to D. Shiels, of Toowoomba (Q.). As Sirdar is a gelding, and consequent on his recent Randwick running will get his full share of weight, he must be considered well sold at the figure mentioned. About 18 months ago R. "Wootton gave 50gs for Sirdar, so that he has not done at all badly out of him. G-yp, by Grafton-— Phantassie, the winner of the Great Ebor Handicap, of 925sovs, one mile- and three-quarters, on the second day of the York meeting, is credited with running the distance in 2min 59 l-ssec. The Australian record is- 3min 3sec, made by the recently-defunct Correze, and the American record is 2min 58£ sec. Semper Vigilans and Carabine, two of Carbine 3 stock, ran unplaced in the race. — A certain jockey's face at a suburban meeting last month was surely a strong argument for- raising weights. We, says the Melbourne Sportsman, were sorry to see liim looking ill, as if he had had to "waste * good deal. Can any man say, with full belief in what he said, th«? it would injure the horses? while we do see ? ancE knov/that the present system of low weights is- injuring our jockeys. — One of the latest objections to- hopples is th» facility they afford for dropping heats andj deceiving the judges of a race. Make the-'hopples tighter than usual, and the horse will he* compelled to shorten his stride. It will do no good (says an Americar papeT) to si;betitute a driver unless a change in the hopples is made. The straps are unsightly, and the horses that wear them are not ideal roadsters. la not the hopple craze dangerous to the breeding interest? — When the mail left England, O. Madden wa» still at the head of the list of winning jockeys, with 79 wins, S. Loates coming next with 64 and L. Reiff third with 60. S. Loato3 has been very unfortunate this season, as after having a long spell through an injury to his collarbone, he has since had to stand down again thorugh straining one of his arms during the course of a race. It is but. tair to Loates to say that when this peculiar accident happened he was beyond doubt riding to win. —Mr Jack Trim, of Wagga (San Fran's new owner), is credited with being one of a select party of backers who won thousands from the ling during the currency of the A.J.C. Spring meeting. Another heavy winner is said to be Mr W. Bray, a Riverina bookmaker, who, because of a to"uch of influenza, so the report goes, decided not to lay the odds, but to back his fancy, a determination which imposed far less etrain upon his throat, and, as the results went, had a decidedly- beneficial effect upon his pocket. — *Mra Allien, to whom Pierre Lorillard left his.' Rancocus stud farmland also his racehorses bo^h ir _AmericV'and in England, has expressed h;eTself "willing to besought oiit by the Lorillard family.,^With that idea, th* trustees of the will haveTbMjn appraising the Valiie offhe farm and the horses in train-ing, and a settlement will probably be made shortly. The cost of maintaining Rincooas is in it33~l|_a serious item, estimated' at fi*m 30,000d0.' to 4O>ouOdol a year, bo that none bixt a person 01 large independent means could afford the luxuiy. — The King's racehorses will (says- London Truth) run next year in his Majesty's name and colours, and "the best of them are to be trained with a view to their being at their best at Ascot. If all is well, the King and the Queen and the Court will attend the Taces on the Tuesday and the Thursday in the old "Ascot State," which has not been seen out since 1860, and there will be a large party at Windsor Castle for the meeting, including some foreign royalties. Ascot races will take place during the- week before the Coronation.

— A curious story comes from Ireland. Somewhere about the beginning of the nineteenth century a very handsome and valuable silver chalice disappeared from Clontarf Church, where, for over 80 years, it had been used in the celebration of mass. The vessel has been discovered in the possession of _ a gentleman whose family has owned it undisturbed for a couple of generations, a former member having- won it at the Cheltenham races in 1833! An inscription on the foot of the cup proves its conversion from sacred uses to play the part of a, race trophy. It has now been restored to Clontarf Church.

—An Irishman who went to a race meeting for the first time in his life was so delighted at seeing two of his friends win a large sum for them on one of the races, that he was easily persuaded to speculate half-a-crown on one of the "neddies" in another race. "As the horse* came past the judge's box Pat' 3 fingers clutched the back of the seat and his eyes- were wide -with excitement. The horse on which he had bet finished sixth. Pat, without a word, but •with a look of deep disgust, got up and turned down to the paddock where the- jockeys were. Calling the youngster who had- ridden the particular horse aside, Pat inquired in deeply injured toaesr--' la hivdn's name, young man, phwat detained you?' " — Reviewing the- Melbourne Cup candidates, aad specially referring, to Hautvillers, "G00&wood,' in the Argus notes: — "A reference to the book shows that of the 40 Melbourne Cups run* to date 11 have been won by three-year-olds, but only one of thsm ha-3 carried a heavier weight than Hautvillers is called upon to put up. That was Newhaven, who, meeting a very weak field, won with 7.13 up. Clean Sweep last year only carried 7.0 ; Merriwee, the previous year, 7.6; and Auraria, in 1895, 7.4. Still Hautvillexs is quite up to a- weight like 7.12. His stable companion, Maltster, last year carried 7.11 into second place, and a three-year-old in Aurum ran third, carrying: no le?s than 8.6 to Gaulus's 7.8 and The Grafter's 7.7."

— By eoinmand of the Khtg, ft sale v«-9S hold on Ascot racecourse on August 14 of the whole of the buildings on the course (with the exception of the grandstand, the property of the trustees on a lease- from the Crown), comprising the Boyal stand, Master of the Buckhounds stand, press stand, Jockey Club stand, building, and stabling of the Royal horses, and carriages. The principal sums. were: — Master of the Buckhounds stand £63,. and Royal stand £34. The total sum realised was (says an exchange) £217 5s for buildings, which the auctioneer said would cost £40,000- to replace. The whole of the buildinga sold are to be- demolished and removed in a month, and the new buildings, which the Kingintends to erect, to be- proceeded with immediately. — Mr George Hodgman, in his amusing book, "Sixty- Years on the Turf," recently published, describes- a curious race at Ascot in 1853, which put a very large sum into the pocket of Davies, the "Leviathan." bookmaker. Four horses, Sittingbourne, The Reiver, Filbert, and Nutpecker, ataxted in the Fourth Triennial Stakes. The last named two- caxried no money at all, but there was a heav.y and substantial gambling over the other two, and Davies laid against them till backers were exhausted. As soon as the flag fell Sittingbourne and The Reiver, instead of racing, reared up, then rushed at each other, open-mouthed, fighting like wild beasts. The result was Filbert won easily. Mr Hodgman observes that the incident stands unique in turf hiatojx.

— Afte. the evidence had been given in a

Soutt Melbourne "two-up" case, Dr Jones, in pleading guilty for his clients, entered upon a lergihy discourse £>s to gambling being a weakness inseparable from human nature, and a frailtj that ought not to be punished. The accused, he urged, were just as much jntitled tc foregather for play as men of social position who gambled at their clubs without hindrance. "I gamble," cried Di Jones. "I suppose at my club I have lost more money in one night than the whole of these fellows have got put together." Mr Thistlethwaite. (horrified) — Oh Dr Jones ! Dr Jones (smiling unctuously) : It looks bad, perhaps, but we all have gambling instincts, from archbishops downwards. If there was no gambling spirit there would be no commercial spirit. — The American horseman, Danny Maher, who is rated a better jockey than Todi Sloan, has bsen doing some extraordinary riding lately in England. According to our English files, he achieved a great feat when he got Fortunatus home for the Goodwood Cup. Half a mile from home the horse's chance appeared so hopeless that odds of 10 to 1 were offered against him, and his backers regarded their money as lost. Mahsr, however, nursed his mount in most exquisite fashion, and succeeded in keeping him going while Inquisitive and Fleur d'Ete were beating each other, finally swooping down upon them and winning quite comfortably at the finish. It was a positive triumph of artistic horsemanship, and the cheers which greeted Maher's return to the paddock were most honestly merited.

— Two rnenxßexa. of- a- sporting club had a little difference, over which they came to high - words — at least one of them did, fox he is an irascible fellow, while the other is a cool, caustically satirical chap, who makes his most scathing remarks with specially irritating de-

liberation. The blusterer is as bald'as a jug, and (gays "Javelin/ in the Melbourne Leader)

as -he vehemently contradicted the other, in

his excitement he pulled off his hat and shook it violently in the face of hi? adversary, who, pertinently directing his gaze upon the noisy man's scalp, which shone as brightly and as bare as the shell of a duck egg, quietly remonstrated: "Now don't get your hair off,

old chap." The roar of laughter which followed this satirical snapshot only increased the anger of the other, who before he cooled down a bit had only escaped an apoplectic fit by a long neck.

— The conduct of the riders at the late meeting of the Avondale Club was on the whole good, but two of the number, E. Abbott and W. Satman, do noc appear, says the Auckland Sporting and Dramatic Review, to have been awed by the warning given them by the committee of the Auckland Racing Club when granting their licenses. In one case E. Abbott was fined £5 by the starter for breaking through

the barrier, aad in the Mount Albert Handicap,

on the -second day, a complaint of reckless riding was made against Sat-man, who had the mount on Sparkling Water. It was alleged that immediately after the start Satman, who was on the outside, took his horse right across his field, interfering with several, Rosella, the winner, being among the number. Of course. Satman ■explained that ho could not help it, and blamed the mare. The stewards considered that a reprimand would meet the case, and, al-

though perhaps they were right, it is probable

that the Auckland committee, who had so re'ceafcly warned him, would not have been quite so easily satisfied, - — Tli?- steamer Sophocles, which reached

[MsHfcmrne from England recently, had on board ptfce thoroughbreds Old Clo', Louis XIII, and V<?jkletta, .ill of which axe destined for the

Havilah stud, New South Wales. Louis XIII,

who was one of the best-leaking 1 sires in the old country, will take up his quarters in tlie box

formerly occupied by Cranbrook,

Hts stock

are very highly spoken of. Vendetta, who was only- foaled, in 1896, will, in all probability, be raced in Australia. By Orme from Nemesis, by St. Gatien, etc., he is bred on moat fashionable lines, and that he can gallop is proved beyond the shadow of a doubt by the number of races which he annexed during the last couple of seasons. "When, says the Melbourne Sportsman, hi 3 turf career is ended, Vendetta should prove » decided acquisition to the ranks of our thoroughbred stallions. Old Clo', the third member of the team, 13 well known, in Australia. She returns to her native heath to take up stud duties at Havilah, after a brief sojourn on the English turf, during which the daughter of Lochial met with a fair measure of success. — The thoroughbred horse Correze dropped dead recently at Myrangle, Cumnock, while being led The horse was only recently, say 3an exchange, purchased by Mr A. E. Anderson,

and had a busy- season before him at the stud

Correze was by Nawnnnister from Ouid>a, by Yattendon from My Fancy, a sister to My Love- and Lady Emma. As a racehorse, Correze was a brilliant performer as a two-yoar-old, among other races securing the A.J.C. December Stakes. The following year lie gained third place in the Melbourne Cup won by Carbine. He won the V.R.C. Handicap, one mile and three-quarters, in the record time of 3min 3&sc, and the A.J.C. St. Leger in fast time. He was a grand-looking- stallion, and secured, the Syd-

ney Mail champion prize of J6150 at the Royal Agriculturat Society's show, 1900. Among the mo»t successful of th» racehorses aired by him. were First Consul, T.M.S., and Zurich, th» winner of the Q.T.C. St. Leger. The loss of so valuable a sire is a serious oaae, especially at this time of the aessoa, for Mr Anderson, who has been to a great, dead of ■expense in getting together a small but select atttd. — A New York paper says it is much to be regretted that in the earlier days of American racing records were so carelessly kept. A table showing the changes since a mite in lmin SOsec was the top notch would ba almost invaluable, but it can never be compiled. Among the earlier known records, in 2855 Charlej' Ball made- a sensation by running st mile in lmin 45 3-ssec, at Lexington. Along about the close of the Civil War, Maniuaona and Revolver ran in lmin 41sec. and this stood as th& record until Herzog, by Vandal, in 1869, ran a mile in lmin 43sec or lmin 43sec and a fraction. Saline. ~an in lmin 43aec-in 1871. This was in the fiist heal of the Viley Stake 3at Lexmgton, May 23, 1671. Ginger took the second heat, and Express won the third and fourth heats and the race. The day previous Fadladeen, by "Wai Dance, wan a imile dash :n lnrin 43sec. Another performance of interest was Searcher's mile in. lmin -tlfsec.at the- Lexington Spring meeting o£ 1875, being the first time lmui 42sec waa ever beaten. This last son of Enquirer was» sold, to George Lorillard,. and renamed Leander, but was poisoned soon after his purchase by Borne undiscovered miscreant. — Returning fi-out Sydney, some of us were chatting, says the Special Commissioner of the

Melbourne Sportsman, iv ..he smoker about oldtinie jockeys. Sir Moore, a well-known, amateur rider of the ".seventies," and the veteran Caulfield trainer, I. T. Car^like, who tbotit the same tune piloted manr a jumpe to victory, were inclined to award the- palm for all-round horsemanship to Billy Enderson, who, when barely 6st, used to ride over fences like centaur. "Whether an the flat or across country, "little Billy" was equally at Lome in the saddle, and Mr Moore enthusiastically described, the scene in Kirk's Bazaar when the natly Canary put up the high jump record with Endei c on in the saddle. Many were the anefciotes Mi Moore related of Enderson's deeds m the hunting Held, and he was rather astonished to hear that his old favourite is still m the flesh. Until recently, poo. Endcrson, looking o'rl and worn beyond his years, haunted Kirk's Bazaar, the scene of his high jumping exploit, but he v.-as last week admitted to the Benevolent Asylum Poor old Billy! When n* woa the Melbourne

Cup on The Quack, amidst the plaudits of the multitude, he little dreamt that the evening of his life would be spent in a charitable institution.

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Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2482, 9 October 1901

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2482, 9 October 1901

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