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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Ibex is doing strong work at Randwick. — Senior Wrangler is to join Hariy Elhs's string. — It is said (.hat Flyirg Fox's fee per mare is to be 600gs. — New Zealand Cup acceptances are due on Friday, August 2. — Vandyke is being hacked, and the son of Vanguard is looking 1.15 nii«l >\e,l en it — Red Gauntlet, the =ou of Lochiel, is once more in active coinrnissioa at Vv lrgattu. — Billet Doux will fall out ot the New Zealand Cup, but Canteen wni be paid up for. — - In West Australia the Kalgcorhe Jockey Club has up to date spent £20,000 on its course. — It was expected that the profits over the T.R.C. National meeting would be about £500. — Oban fell in the Auteuil Grand Hurdle Knee last month. He was running second at the time. — The amount of stakes to be given by the D.J.C. next season is not to exceed that ot last season. — 'According to the Australasian. Tattersall's sweeps are not likely to be stopped for at least two years. — At the annual meeting of the E^mont Racing Club the profit on the year's working wa,s announced to bs £1163. — The St. LegeT— Vale-^tma colt Billet Doux in Mr H. Goodman's stable, is to be put into active commission this week. — A Perth message states that the Carbine mare Model, owned by Mr A. White, o-f New Zealand, has broken hei neck. — M. Cannon has been on the second horse four times in the English Derby. His only ■win waß achieved on Flying Fox. —In the V.R.C. Steeplechase course ?t Flemington there pre 21 obstacles to be surmcunted, and all are very formidable. — The largest fields that have started for the C. Grand National Steeplechase were in ti_* years 1894 and 1899, when 21 started. — During the settling over the V.R.C. Grand National meeting a wager of JE2030 to X6O about Benvolio for the Caulfield Cup was recorded. — Bert Hewitt is on a visit to Dunedro, and has been engaged to tide the Hon. George M'Lean's colt Pampero m the New Zealand Cup. — The owner of the steeplechase mare Koro•wai has, according to a Sydney paper, decided to send her to the stud during the coming season. — "Cash" Sloan, the brother of "Tod," recently rode 15 consecutive winners, and altogether had scored in 22 of his total of 32 nicunts. — An Axiekland telegram states that the racehorse Fitzs:mmons, for Messrs L. D. Nathan and Co , has arrived in the Pakeha in good condition. ' — Sagacity, the double winner at the V.R C. National fixture, was recently put under the hammer -with a reserve of 600gs, but he was pasred at l"»gs. — "Theie have been more men ruined during ihe last 12 months by dredging shares than "were ruined in 10 years by the totaiisator." — Mr Carneross, M.H R. — Laceby, prior to the "race in the V.R.C. Steeples, when he bToke his shouldeT and had to* be destroyed, had won no fewer than nine times out of his last ten starts.' — Freedom's 6min 32see was a record for the V.SR C. Grand National Steeplechase. It was 7Jsec faster than Rosebud's time last year, ■which, up to then, was the record. — Record Rs ign will prob9bly race on the fi<»t at Caulfield National meeting. The exXew Zealander has been putting in some good •work since he took part in. the V.R.C. meeting. — The report of the Victoria Ra-cing Club show-3 the profits of the year to be £6832. The Cup meeting resulted in a profit of £11,027,, aud the Autumn meeting in a loss of £3061. Tho stakes pai3 totalled over £40,000. — At the settling over Grand National meeting, one backer, whose liab.iities run into £1500. asked for time, and a bookmaker, whose liabilities amounted to a few hundred, also intimated that he was not prepared to settle at present. 7- The English-bred colt Sir Foot, who is in I. Earnshaw's stable, is commencing to move along at Randwick. Like most of the imported horses, he shows a lot of quality, a<nd, taking appearances for it, he should be heard from later on. — Towards the end of the English Derby Yolodvovski momentarily stopped, and it was thought he was in trouble. However, he went on. again and won. According to R-eifl, it was the shouts of the crowd that scared Volodyovski and caused him to stop. — Epsom Lad. who beat Diamond Jubilee in the Princess of Wales's Stakes, value £10,000, belongs to Mr James Buchanan, of Buchanan whisky fame. Mr Buchanan races in the assumed name of Mr Kincaid, and he bought Epsom Lad for 1050gs last year. —Mr H. Barnato's four-year-old gelding Quick Shot, by Carbine from Santa Felice, carried 8.0 to victory in the Eden Welter Handicap at Liinglield Park on June 12. There ■were only five starters, and odds of 2 to 1 were ■laid on Quick Shot. He won esri'v. — Lowland Chief was -tbe only favouiite to ■win on the opening day of the V.R C. Grand National meeting. Victor, Korow&i, and Saps city were favourites for the respective races lhey annexed on the second day ; whilst not a Finale rirst choice caught the judge's eye on the last day. — The subscriptions to Diamond Jubilee for next season — his first — are all taken, the fee being 300gt.. In Florizel 11, Persimmon, and "The Diamond," his Majesty is possessed of a lr.aginficent and rema-rkable trio. Rosicrucian in s>res to mate with them should be at a oremium. to breed another Volodyovski. — The match between Osterley and Digitalis has fallen through. Digitals strained the muscles of his thigh while training, and Mr Alex. Robert=o_i had to forfeit the £50 deposited to bird the match. Digitalis was being trained by Will 1 Whitburu, the well-known comedian, and was going very well at the time of the accident. —Of the Derby winner Mr John Corlett wrote a few days before the race — ''Vo'odyovski takes his name from Michael Volodyovski, who was a general undeT John Sobieski, King of Poland, in his famous campaign against the Turks, and he is the hero of a historical romance, ba-sed on the period, by the author of ' Quo Vadis?' ' — Though Saxon, the French Derby winner, was foaled in France, he is espentially an Eng-lieh-bred colt, for he is by The Bard out of Shrine, his sire and dam having been purchased out of the old country. The Bard finished second to the great o:mor.de: mor.de for the T>erby of IRB6. and, bought by the Irte M. H. Say the following year for 10,doOgs, he was sent to France. — Peter Jackson, the ex-champion heavyweight boxer of the world, died at a private sanatorium at Roma on the evening of July U r from consumption, a-ged 40 years. The funeral of Jackson took pisce at -Brisbane on July 16, ?nd the cert*ge wag three-quarters of a mile long. Amomg3t tke followers were nearly all the promment sporting men of the city. — Some id"ea of the demand on the services ot the leading jockeys m England ca.n b^e- gained v/hen iz is ni6nt.on.ed that froir March 25 to ?-{ny 17 O. Madden lode >'n 185 races, S. Loates 156. M. Cannon in 117, K. Cannon in 121, J. l>erff in 110, W. Lane in 112, and F. Rickaby 1 in, 102. Madden was the most successful, for he was first on 33 occasions, S. Loates had 26 ■Bj/jjiiEg i-id&a, M. Cannon 19, and J. Reifl IS.

— Fieedorn, the winner of the Giand National Steeplechase, was picked up by Aii JVmes Murray tor £30 at a meet of hounds. Aitpr winning the Warrnambood Grand Annual Steeplcd «se, Mr Murray sold Freedom to Mr S. La?arus for £70, with a further contingency of £50 if he won the Bendigo Steeplechase. As Fieedom. won, and the stake was worth £150, Mr Lazarus may be said to have got Fieedom for nothing. — Messrs J. E. Brewer, Leslie Macionald, S. F. Reynolds, and M. Trahan were all after Record Reign when the fine son of Castor and Winnie stepped into the bale ring. "Mo," however, "stayed the longest," and (says a Me'bourno exchange) at S2ogs secured a luTse that should make a bold bid for the next Viceroy's Cup. Mr J. Gove bought The Pirate King for 490gs at the same sale. Both horses will probably go to India. —An experienced watchholder, who knows every inch of the ground, timed two furlongs alone the river side the fir3t time ronnd in the National, and the leaders (says the Melbourne SpciUman) covered tho distance and jumped three rasping b g fences m 32sec, just over even time' And that was how they set out for a steeplechase extending over three miles and a In i long — with 21 formidab'e jumps, by the way 1 Is it any wonder they fall' — The Sporting Times prints the following Derby axioms:— lhe longer the Welshsr's odds the sooner he bolts ; -a watch in youx fob is worth six in. a pickpocket's hand; the copper the urchin desires need tot be mouldy; it is better to compromise and pay at once tihswi to b-et with a woman ;_ the "Old Firm" generally means something new and very shaky; the man who says he as a jockey's friend will be sure to be your enemy ; a straight tip often comes from a crook. — Sir Modred's son, Antteus, and imported Pilgrim's Progress were each represented by a-double-event winner at the V.R.C. Grand National meeting in Lowland Chief and Sagacity respectively. Tr-entoa's son, Shoddy, took the piincipal huidle race, whilst the Musket blood, through Light Artillery and Hotchkiss, claimed another couple of victories. The Admiral, Stationer, Wellington, Grandmaster, Padlock, Postmaster, St. Swithin, and Meteor were each credited with a winner. — There is to be a change of trainers at Major George's establishment at the end of the present month. T. Cotton is, says "Phaeton," in the Auckland Weekly, I understand, to tske charge of the Wapiti team. Cotton came up from Dunedin last year under eng3gemeai>t to train for the Queensland si ortsman, Mr H. Mosman, but after a few months' sojourn at the Green Lave establishment a lupfure took plac?, and since then Cotton has been devoting most of his tim* on trotters. — The marriage of Ernest Day. of Epsom, who is well known in sporting circles iv Melbourne, with Miss Skinner, of Holbeck Hall, Notts, took plsce on June 13. The j"oung lady's ancestors have for over a hundred years been substantial tenant "farmers on the Duke of Portland's estates. Mr Day has done good service in the successful transport of many va .liable hoises. among them being Ormonde, Carbine ar_d Bill of Portland. He is also an almost world-wide t-aveller. — The Imperial Cup, one mile, run at Lingficld Park on June 12, and yon by the American horse Flambard 9.0, was, according to a private chronometer, covered in lmin 33 2-ssec. If the time is true the American horse must have been in a great hurry to get to the winning post. The record for the mile is held by Caiman, over this same course, lmin 33 l-ssec. The Ltngfield mile is a gradual slope downwards the whole way, until about SO yards from the vinning-post, where there is a slight incline to the end. — The following are- notable characten^ic? of the purebred Arab- — Bead: Broad, square forehead, small ears, prominent and brilliant eye, short, fine muzzle, wide nostril, thin lower law, and beautifully developed course of veins. The body generally light, and chest not so proportionately wide as in the English blood horse, but behind the amis the barel generally swells out, leaving room for the play of the lungs. Neck long and arched, and beautifully joined to chest. High withers, fine les;s, oblique pasterns, all the leg bone being of the densest character. — Arnpier, who won the last Epsom Handicap, had a run m the July Handicap at Flemirgton. He was last to finish, and his performance led to his rider, C. Cooper, being censured. Arnpier is said to have improved greatly in appcara-nce since he previously raced, and is in nice condition to undergo a, preparation for the spring handicaps He has Sst 31b in the Caulfield Cup, and though so far he has only woa up to a mile, there is no reason why he should not be able to stay fah^y. — Racing and betting on a large scale have seldom, if evor, brought ruin in theit train, and this we (London Sportsman) maintain, despite the "classic" cases of Lord Hastings and Mr Benzon, the Jubilee Plunger, which ant:g?mb'ers are so fond of quoting. Both of these bold speculators won large sums of money as often almost as they lost them, and their downfall was due to causes entirely unconnected with, the turf, which are well known to people moving about the world of sport and fashion. — The annual report of the committee of the Tapanui Raciag Club states that the ba'ance feheei shows that a small profit was made on the two days' race meeting. The club managed Id keep off the '"tote-bettor-spieler element. ' These men are described as "a perfect curae to the spc-rt, ard the racing clubsVaould ask th.s Government to legislate against the nr desirable class -who follow up races, agricultural chows, Rnd other public gatherings, and Drey upon the holiday miking community." Improvements continue 1o be made on the club'e leasehold property, and buildings, etc., are m good order. — An American says, m cemmentmv; on accidents ua races, thit cases of cuttmg-down fcem to have become more frequent of late, and vdthout doubt they are mostly attributable to the sharp steel toes which are used on the plates, to give a horse a firmei foothold. Originally these were only used for muddy and slippery weather, but now horses ar-> plated with tl.em. al-o with caulks on the heels, at all times. The idea is that the toes and heels act U;p the spikes in running shoes, and are an advantage. The =teel toe, when it hits a horse, cuts like a razor, and accidents of the kind are frequent in consequence. — "The English srorting press laughed at Sutton Sievier for the extravagant prices he gave for yearlings at the Duke of Westminster's sale last year. The laugh is now on the plunger's side. Sceptre, for which he paid £10,000, got him his money ba-ck first time of asking, and is, at- current prices, woith half as much again. For another purchase, that has not started yet, he could get £3000, or £2500 more than be gave. As a matter of fact, Sievier and his trainer (Morton) are among the shrewdest judges of thoroughbred stock m England, and have not made a bad purchase yet, or a bad sale either." — Sydney Bulletin's Home corespondent. — A short time back the colt foal by HotchJdss from Que-en Cole fell while galloping in the paddock at Wellington Park, with the nsnlt that he broke one of his forelegs. As the youngster claimed, full brothership to the Centtuy Stakes winner. Battleaxe, and was a rea-lly fine youngster, Mr Mornn thought it worth while to make an effort to save the colt's life. The limb was. placed in plaster, but though the yovuigsl?r pio\ed himself a most willing patient, Mr Halstecvd, t^e v«t., who had the case in hand, never entertained much hop". and his fears proved correct. The let? vcv'd not knit, and it was therefore doenied advisable to destroy the coib.

— "The starting aate was used for the fust time for Volodjov»ki's Derby," writes a Bulletin corespondeat from England, "and the start v>as de'ayed half an hour owing to sheer funk on tbe part of some of the English ndcis. Ihere is a good chance here for Australian trpmars and for a couple of =mart jocks used to the gate. A good Australian trainer could show some of them here many a wrinkle in training and placing hoises. Hickey, who has done so well with Australian Star and The Grafter, has now got as many horses as he can attend to, and the Days have a long string. There are ro ether Australian t'ai'iors here. —In his book "Sixty Years on the Turf,' Mr G. Hodgman has a cnapter uvon the American invasion. The author sketches out his idea of the reason that it has been so sucessful, and suggests the method by which it should be stemmed. His idea is — and this is shared by many other men of great experience m English turf matters — that it was a, very great mistake to raise the minimum weight m handicaps to 6st, and he remarks: "I did not always think so, but I air convinced now that a return to even 4st 7lb would be of immense benefit to the turf. In that case trainers would be compelled to look after and bring out apprentices, and owners, m turn, to allow them to be put up. —To a ceitain extent the. Australian Government is prepared to re' ax from the firm attitude it has hitherto taken up in connection with the clauses m the Postal Bill affecting the transmission of letters to "Tattersall's" m Tasmania. The causes will not become operative, assuming the bill to pass the House of .Representatives withoxit vital amendment, until regulations have been diafted for effecting their purpose. There is a disposition on the part of the Government to rfiain from taking steps to draft the regulatrons until the question as to State rights raised by the Tasmaaian Government has been settled by the Federal High Court. This means that Tattersall's is safe for another couple of years at least. —It is evident, scys ' Reginald" in the Sportsman, that the New Zealand-bred Korowai has a will of her own. She didn't nke the look of Flemmgton country at all. When she did jump she did it "m jerks," always waiting to see plainly what was m front of her before making the attempt. As somebody said as she came down the "big lane, ' caiefulW examining the obstacles before tackling them, she would jump a lot of fences in a long time, and after completing half the journey she found an excuse to stop altogether, and she quickly made up her mind about it. That much-abused water was blamed for Korowpi's pooj exhibition at the Valley, but there was no such excuse for her in this Steeplechase. She evidently just docs as she pleases. — Wt'itmg in the "London Sportsman of June 14, m leferrmg to the notice given by the Jockey Club that the starting gate would bs used at all races except in some special co^ditiois, where permission may be given for the relaxation of the rule, "Vigilant" says- — "J do not suppose any opposition will be made to this, and I think we may take it for grafted that, after encountering s-, imui<"i=e rip- rf oposition, the starting gate has ' come to stay,' and "that four people out ol e\eiy v,,. I.i _ v y convinced of its immense superiority to the old method of starting. - We have undoubtedly seen some very pool staits, even by the aid of the gate, but these wi'l grow less fiequent seasou by season, whilst the saving of time and the improvement in the matter of punctuality, have been really wondeifnl." — A young lady invalid was attended by a doctor of snorting proclivities, who claimed to be primed with racing information. Whenever he visited his patient, the local chemist {says "Javelin, in the Melbourne Leader), whose shop was opposite, stepped across to get the latest tip. Many and long were the interviews, and one day the patient's biofeher said to the chemist's assistant "I say, if your boss keeps on detaining the doctor when he comes to my place, I shall be ruined. It's all charged in my bill, you know." "If you ask me, replied the assistant, "'if your sister don't get well soon there'll be a chemist's shop to let in this street, for if my boss keeps on | punting on the doctor's tips he'll go bung, as j sure as pills is pills'" — One of the principal features of the V.R.C. Grand National meeting was the excellent time made in the .jumping races. With the exception of the Grand National Hurdle Race on the opening day, all other jumping events eclipsed previous records. Although our steeplechase hoises (says "Caspian" of the Weekly Times) | put tip records, it must be admitted by everyone who witnessed the racing that our steeplei cbasers are not as expert in the art of lepping ' as one is accustomed to witness over Flemington. It may be argued in their favour that the pace being so fast brought many down. However, that is part of the contract in accepting for a steeplechase. Nowadays a horse has to be thoroughbred and a clever fencer with a fair amount of pace before he can be expected to win at headquarters. — The huge outlay in bloodstock made last July at Newmarket by Mr R. S. Sievier has, alter all, in the face of many pess.mists, proved a profitab'e one. Already some of the animals have been sold to advantage, whilst for the colt by Orme out of Gantlet, now named Duke of Westminstsr, and for Sceptre, winner of the Woodcote Stakes, more has been offered than was paid for the lot. A beautiful mare, Sceptre evidently possesses rare racing ri'trit, and her pedigree, by Persimmon out of Orrament, points to the highest honours at Hip stud. When Mr J. B. Joel (says the Enghsh Sportsman), who is anxious to purchase the filly, asked her owner to put a price on fce~ the reply was — "20,000g=, and if I were not going badly no money would buy mj mare." — The English trainer, John Watts, has 1 sold his coit by Ayrshire out of Formosa, I Bonnie Scotland, for SOOOgs to Mr Earnsha-vr, a rich North-conntrvman, the colt to remain under John Wptts's care. Holding a commission last September on behaTf of Major I Joicey to purchase a couple of yearlings, Watts displayed keen discernment when he selected fiom Mr Ralph Sneyd's batch the colt by Ayrshire out of Formosa for 420gs and the filly by Friars Balsam out of Yesterlmg (Sterling Balm) for 4CO;s. But b^ttei still was in I store for the popular ex-jockey, fo* when "The Major" came down to iNe-.vinrrket to have a lock at the result of his outlay, he most ger.erously presented John Watts with the colt by Ayrshire out of Formosa, for whom, with tli3 major's concurrence, John has just obtained 5i OOgs. — If a man had gone to the Steeplechase meeting on the last day of the V.R C. Grand National meeting with one sovereign to invest; if he had backed the w.nner, and at each subsequent race had pnt on his accumulated winnings and again backed tbe winner, the £1 would have been worth £168 000 at the end of the fifth race. The odds laid against the winners were 20 to 1, 10 to 1, 14 to 1, j 12 to 1, and 5 to 1. Of course, no backer v-ould have got anything like such prices after the fi>-st two races, for when h<> wpnt J n back « hoi=e c or £0800, and later another £33,600, the bookies would have reefed their mamsiils, «>.iu <.ot i^wiy in a huny from the runtrig tornado. The ciaze some people have for punt.ng -s probably traceable in a measure to their dreairmg j that some day they will strike a succession of winners and "break the ling. — Ballarat Courier. — Peter Oack°on. the once champion heavyucifflit boxei, who died at the beginning o" this month at the early age of forty, was r man or som* 1 considerable distinction. Though his health was under1 aiiaccl by umvliolesonie moral environment, not

so his manliness ami Ticnenly, which in the height of. his succe°s, as in the worst of evil times, were unassailable. Nobody who knew him well e\ei associated him with anythirg crooked; and although a black skinned pugilist, Peter Jackson was metaphorically one of the whitest of white men. He was evidently of a kindly and gcod-nattued disposition natuinliy, and when he (says a Melbourne writer) died his worst enemy probably died also. Many a so-called refutable member of society has far less light to the title than had this West Indian gladiator, whose right hand when not encased in a boxing glove was so frequently m his pocket that long before he died the pocket had nothing left in it. — The two great Auteuil (France) jumping races, m which British horses have often ma^c their mark, were iuu recently, but our candidates (says the English correspondent of the Australasian) on this occasion cut a very sony figure The Grand Steeplechase de Pans, al 6U2osovs, four miles and 110 yards, weight-for-age, was fir3l decidid, and it attracted 13 runners, of whom Mr S B. Joel's Uncle Jack wa3 second favourite at 6 to 1, while another Britisher in Major Eustace Lodoi's Covert I-Jaek found backers at 25 to 1. The latter was never prominent, but Uncle Jack led till half a mile from home, and finished sixth. For the Grand Hurdle Race, of 303250v5, three miles '220 yards, weight-for-age, Mr Edgar Cohen sent Oban over to compete, and the aged Australian was a well-backed third favourite at 10 to 1. Five other English horse 3 were in the field of 15 that faced the starter, but none of them compared in appearance with the French candidate?, and not one got home among the first e]ght. Oban, however, was well placed till he struck into a huidle close home.

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2472, 31 July 1901

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2472, 31 July 1901

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