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Visiting Card Etiquette.

Writes Flora Klickmann in the Lady's Companion : — If the lady is "not at home" when you call, you should leave one of your own cards and two of your husband's ; a man has always to leave a card on the master of the house as well as on the mistres&\, 'whereas a woman only pays her respects to the mistress. If your hostess is at home, then you need not leave one of your own cards for her, but you must leave two of your husband's. These should be left in the hall, or given to the servant, as you go out ; on no account must you hand them to your hostess, or leave them in the drawing room. If your husband accompanies you (though it is not general for husbands and wives to pay calls together), he will only leave one of his cards for the master of the house a* he goes out ; and if he has seen the host as well as the hostess, then tven this one will be unnecessary. There are some people nowadays who make a practice of leaving one of their own and two of their husband's cards as they go out, even when they have seen both host and hostess This is not strictly correct ; a card should only be left in place of, and not in addition to, a personal interview. If a lady icalls on you and you are not at home, ?he will leave cards, and you. must return her call jiist as though you had seen her. You must not wait to return that calJ until after she has found you at home, because she might chance to come several times in succe&sior when you were out. If, however, an acquaintance calls, and does not ask if you are at home, but merely hands in cards to the servant, you must return the courtesy in the same way — i.e., merely hand in cards to the servant at her house, without inquiring if she be at home. Visiting cards should be delivered personally., and not &ent through the post ; but of course this does not apply to invitation cards. It is customary to leave cards on acquaintances, after they have invited you to any entertainment, even though you may have had to decline it. The fact that they paid you the compliment of inviting you requires 3 - ou to return them this cour-" tesy. It is sufficient if cards are handed in at the door, it is not necessary to pay a call, though the latter seems more sociable. Men are usually excused the labour of leaving cards after an entertainment, however, if they are much occupied with business duties (and most men are in the present day) ; bxit whenever possible, it is expected that then* women-folk leave cards for them. The sooner cards are left after a call or an entertainment, the greater com-

cases only a couple of days should elapse, though between intimates 10 days or even a fortnight is permissible. ~'To ensiiriTmiblication in the forthcomiwj is.;ur, letters should rer.eh the WHness off.cc ij possible on Saturday nifjJit, but on no account later than Monday inn fit BS3- Descriptions of balh, etc., mvtt be endorsed by either the Witness corr-spondoitfor thedutiict or by the secretary to the ball committee. The MS of any correspondents who do not comply with thin rule iotu be sent to the secretary .for emloi sement prior to appearing. — EMMELIKE. O.F.Q. BALL AT WAIPORI. Dear Emmeline. — "There was a sound of revehy by night. Foi Waipon tov/nsLip had gathered, then, Her b"a<ity and her chivalry; And bright the lamps shone o'er faT women and brave men.'' It was on the night of the 14th June, when I was sauntering along Flodden street, that such sound* >f revelry smote my *ar. I stepped acioss to asceitam the cause, and afc the hall doer ran against my old cii am. He in^oimed me that it was the second annual ball °iven by the employees of the O.P.CJ. mine -that was in full swing. (Being boraewhat a recluse, I had not heard that the} contemplated givm? a ball.) We entered together, 9nd, oh! what a sight met our gaze. The artistic decorations, which must liave cost hours of labour, fully repaid all troub'f. Here and there one caught glimpses of Chinese lanterns amidst the foliage, and the banners, reefing implements, and the throng of ladies resijTendent in gorgeous evening attire, all combined to convert the room into a veritable fairy land. AYe were too late to see the Grand March, which was led off by Miss M. Lomas and Mr J. Gare, but not too late for the ensuing dance. On all other occasions 1 have preferred the role of "wallflower" to "dancer, ' but who could resist dancing to the exquisite music that characterised this ball 9 — and I danced. Piano, Miss Black ; violin, Mr Eoughan; cornet, Mr Kerr. I shall not attempt to describe the dresse3 worn by the ladies, for how can a poor bachelor be expected to distinguish between tulle and chirion, satin and lustre The catering was in the hands of Mr Knight, and very refreshing were the goblets of iemonade, etc., that were quaffed', for dancing is rather a warm pastime. Several songs and step-dances were contributed! throughout the evening. Truly, the employees of the O.P.Q. mine are to be heaitily congratulated on their balls, which ever prove to be great successes. And now I have finished the description. My chum, who came in while I was writing, has departed, and I am left to enjoy my weed in solitude. — OLIVER, PAGE.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19010619.2.257

Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Issue 2466, 19 June 1901

Word Count
945

Visiting Card Etiquette. Otago Witness, Issue 2466, 19 June 1901

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