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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Handicapper's starting price for the Iwo Thousand Guineas was 33 to 1.

— Walter Robertson is back again at Oamaru helping his brother with his team. — The rising three-year-old full sister to Tsaritsa has been named La Russe.

— A movement in favour of paid racing stew«Tds is gaining ground in Victoria. — Finland and Dirk Hammerhand broke down ■whilst at Adelaide for the last meeting.

— Toddmgton, bought by Mr R. S. Sievier for £10,000 last year, has turned roarer. — The Carbine horse War God has been leased by his owners for stud purposes. — Strathmore, the Christchurch pacer, has been purchased by Mr J ames M'Kewen. —On the morning of the Grand National Hurdles Cavaliero did two solid rounds on the tan.

— Cannongate will probably be shipped ..o Sydney after fulfilling his Auckland engagements.

— Volcanic, a winner of a steeplechase at Handwick recently, is a half brother to Dummy. — Mr S. Hoi-dern denies the report thathe has sold the St. Simon horse Gigue to a New Zealand buyer. —Stepson, the Stepniak — Britomarte colt, has fceen taken from J. Lowe's stable, and will be trained at Otaki. — -'Princess Melton, who cost Mr Joel j£15,000 last year, could not get a place in_|eh One Thousand Quineas. — A colt by the Australian-bred Loyalist, ■who was at the stud in America, ran in the Two Thousand Guineas. — Ingliston, who is reported to be freah and fcright after his long holiday, has been again put into work at Caulfield. — The Tasmanian, steeplechaser Hero, who did fairly well at the game in the "tight little island," has reached Caulfield. — R. Gooseman, the trainer of Coeur de Lion, supported the Auckland winning double for £300 previous to the Wanganui meeting. — Ben Bolt, a stallion by Ascot from Sweet Alice, has been sold by Messrs W. C. Yuille and Co. to a New Zealand buyer. — Mannlicher, by Carbine from Memoir, by St. Simon, won the principal race on the first day of the Newmarket Spring meeting. — Although Aurum's list is full at 50gs for 1901 and subscriptions being booked for 1902, a eervice by him is advertised for sale at 25gs. — Sir Foot, an English-bred three-year-old colt by the Derby winner, Sir Hugo, from Surefoofc's dam, is in work at Randwick, Sydney. — The Hon A. Mosman recently purchased in Brisbane a yearling full brother to Master Bemie. The youngster cost his new owner 300gs. —Mr Allison says that Mr Sievier is not letting heavily this year, and won next to nothing over Australian Star in the City and Suburban. . — A horse with the absurd name of Mairp Las arrived at Flemington from, the country. He is a son of Priam — hence the ridiculous nomenclature. — Oannongate struck the last fence of the double jump the last time round in the Grand IVationaJ Steeplechase. He got a nasty cut in the stifle. — Mr L. D. Nathan, the Auckland sportsman -who is at present in England, was amongsi those who witnessed the race for the Two Thousand Guineas. Wakawatsa started favourite at 7 to 4 against in a welter at Randwick on June 1. The evergreen son of Apremont was second with 11.2 on his back. . — Mr W. T. Jones has selected the following names for his -yearlings : — Colt by Grafton from Lady Trenton, "Elgin"; colt by Bill of Portland from Barley, "Maelgwyn." — Coeur de Lion was favourite in Wellington •with the starting-price layers for the Auckland Hurdle Race last Monday, there being little nioney on the favourite, Cavaliero. — The well-known Victorian performer Fleet Admiral (Richmond — Footstep) goes to New South Wales, Mr Tyson having* purchased him from Mr J. Rowen for stud purposes. — It is said of a doctor's horse that in 12 years he has travelled London streets a distance of 13,000 miles. He has never been shod, and his feet are the admiration of veterinary surgeons. — The colt foal by Curio out of Signorina, ■which was the only one born alive to that celebrated mare, died in England last month, from a twist in the bowels, after living about six weeks.

Taral, the American, jockey, has impressed the Austrian owners with his riding. At the Vienna meeting held at the latter end of April he rode three winners on the first day and two on the second.

A Kalgoorlie syndicate is importing an automatic totalisator to the Boulder from New Zealand. It is to be employed at the forthcoming race meetings, if arrangements can be made. A"t Hobart recently, of the six horses who started in the Hurdle Race, one, Elon, fell and broke his neck, another simply fell, a third ran off, and the fourth baulked, leaving only two to finish. The Belgian jockeys are said to have cultivated "bumping," until it has become almost a fine art, and calculated to cause envy among those professionals who have crossed the Atlantic to ride in Europe. — The effect of the American change is already making itself felt in the old country. The English jockeys are carrying all before them, showing that, on equal terms, they are more than a match for the Yankees. — The Adelaide police recently conducted an ■unsuccessful prosecution against two bookmakers for having unlawfully wagered on the Derby stand, Victoria Park racecourse,- during the progress of the Birthday meeting. — The well-known Victorian sportsman, Mr J. O. Inglis, officiated as starter at Epsom (Vie.) in the absence of Mr (j. Watson. The Sportsman says Mr Inglis succeeded in despatching the large fields in good style. —Mr George Boyd, a well-known bookmaker of Sydney Tattersall's, was on Mey 31, at the rooms, presented with a handsome travelling bag and a puree of sovereigns on the occasion of his departure for England. The whole of Mr John Crozier's horses have beer placed in the hands of Messrs Yuille and Co., Melbourne, for private sale. They include Gunga Din, Dirk Hammerhand, Cicero, and the yearling brother to Amiable and Security. — This is the way the advertising tipster angles for the unwary punter in England: "Advertiser, who is a valet to a well-known jockey, is desirous of communicating special turf intelligence to a few gentlemen. Specimen wiie half a crown "

— In England the premiums for insuring race meetings against stress of weather and abamdonnient has been raised this year to 20 pjpr cent. Last sea-son at 14 per cent, a very "big business was done, and the undeiw liters loat substantially. — The poolroom-keepers of New \ork, finding that the police are determined to raid them and are no longer wilimg to accept a bribe to allow them to remain open, blame the American Jockey Club for closing up their business, and vow to get even. — A wager of an even £50 -was made tnat Regalia II would either baulk or fall in the Auckland Grand National Hurdle Race. The horse did not start in this race, but in the first day's hurdles, althoagii he punched several fences very hard, ire managed to get round. — Some time back^ the American trotting

queen, Nancy Hanks, 2min 4sec, produced n filly foal to the English thoroughbied stallion Meddler. This filly is mow to be bred to Bmgen, 2min 6|sec, and it is expected tnat the progeny will be something out of the common. — A.be Moss, the well-known knight of the pencil and owner of the New Zealand Cup candidates Canteen and Billet Doux, left on Sunday last for Melbourne. Mr Moss will probably consult a specialist whilst in Melbourne for a troublesome throat fiom which he has been suffering for some time. — J. Stoddart, proprietor of Sporting Luck, who has been repeatedly, during the last yeai or two, prosecuted and fined for mnning "consultations" on horse races and football competitions, and had recently carried the competitions on from Holland, ha.s at length got fix months' i_nprisonment, in addition to a fine. — Mr Wilfred Stead has a promising candidate for hunter races this winter in the five-year-old Demng Do, by ijermiger — Tohoura, by Forester — Mascotte. He is jumping well, and with a bit of the Yaldnuist polish, ought to hold his own in the hunter class Dcrnrg Do is closely related to Derrmgcotta (Derringer — Mascotte). — In one of the races at the A.R.C. Autumn meeting, the starter, Mr Cutts, inflicted a fine of £10 on S. Lindsay for breaking away repeatedly. The rider appealed to the committee, and the starter was asked for a report of the case. This made a strong case against Lindsay, and the committee decided to sustain the starter's action.

—In the Collingwood Court the other day an expert, Mr J. Phillips, on being questioned as to the trick of horse copers in dealing with broken-winded horses by pouring balls of fat and shot down their throats, stated that a horse then m dispute actually coughed up some fat and shot whilst he had it in hand.

— In Ireland last season moie added money was distributed at race meetings than in any previous year, the total being £46,678. Strangely enough, there were fewer horses competing than in some preceding seasons. The total was 1239, while in 1894 it reached 1448. The falling-off is attributed to the number of jumpers sent to England and the Continent.

— The sire of the Derby winner, Florizel, was not represented on the list of English winning stallions until last season, when Doncles, Floriforrn, Mackintosh, Theatre Royal, and Volodyovski credited him with £9882, placing him eighth on the list to St. Simon (£54,460), Isinglass (£13,747), Galopin (£13,692), Gallinule £13,562), Melton (£13,346), Common (12,458), and Orme (£3512^.

— The Auckland bookmakers have done no business so far over the New Zealand Cup, and refused to quote a price against San Remo, the St. Leger — Cissy colt, during th-e week. The would-be backer offered to take hundreds to six, but there was no response. San Remo is the untried brother to Sant llano, and Mi G. G. Stead's only nomination.

• — A northern exchange says Mr S. H. Gollan is sending the following blood stock to a7iction next month' — Bonnie Scotland, by St. George — Fair Nell, a two-year-old brown colt by Captom Webb — Samoa, two-year-old gelding by Captain Webb — Lady Florin, two-year-old filly by Captain Webb from Nelson's full sister Bonnie Idee, and a yearling full sister to Watenord by Jet d'Eau — Forlorn Hope.

— A writer in the North Queensland Herald says. — '"Parthenopssus, -now standing at Elderslie, has from 12 to 15 promising foals to his credit from seven to eight months old. In addition to station breeding purposes, the handsome but somewhat notorious son of Splendour has been available to the public at the moderate fee of 7gs, with the result that some well-bred mares have been sent to him. '

— A resident of the Dartmoor district, named Henry Cooke, met his death in a peculiar manner last month. Several young fellows were training for the Drik Drik sports, when a gun was fired to start a race. This frightened Cooke"s horse, which was tied to a fence close by, and the- animal, lashing out viciously, kicked his unfortunate owner in the abdomen so severely that the injuries proved fatal.

— A meeting of the bookmaking members of the Victorian Club was held recently, when they agreed that they should not in future guarantee fellow bookmakers with the V.R.C. authorities. In case 3 where a book-maker applied for permission, to ply his calling at Fleimngton, th<} V.R.C. authorities have in the past, m the- absence of any other acceptable secivity, insisted on a guarantee from a member of the Victorian Club to the extent of £500 for the paddock and £200 for the hill.

— The following is a copy of the report made by the sub-committee appointed by' the Canterbury Jockey Club . —"The sub-committee appointed by the Canterbury Jockey Club to consider the running of Bealey beg to report that they find, on investigation, and after taking into consideration the difference, m weights and other conditions of the several races at Christchurch and Ashburton meetings, that there is no evidence to support the charge ot inconsistent running. 1 — There is a rule of the Jockey Club, England, m regard to racecourse companies, which forbids a dividend of over 10 per cent, per Snmim. The regulation, though it appears arbitrary at first sight, has been the mean 9of raising the class of sport on these courses. In former days the racing clubs and companies paid huge dividends ; but the temptation to make sport subservient to the treasury was one few executive bodies cou'd resist, and the result of the rule was to produce a general increase in the value of stakes.

— The London Sportsman says there is at Egerton House a very grand two-year-old, own sister to Florizel 11, Persimmon, and Diamond Jubilee.' When this filly was foaled, her dam, Perdita 11, died, so the young lady had to be brought up by hand. The result is certainly most remarkable, for the fiHj — i,ow a two-year-old — is a splendid specimen. So b:g is she that it is not at all likely her debut on a racecourse will be made until she is tnree years old, c wise policy, which will give her every possible chpju*e. — One of the handsomest hoises seen out at Epsom was Sir Edward Vincent's importation Seringapatam (late Screw Gun). 'ihis compact golden brown son of Hotehki-ss was a competitor m the Noith Park Plate, a race of £'137, over the mile of the Derby course. The New Zealander had to carry 10.7, and under that burden ran ■* cry well indeed, finishing a good fourth, after a fast-run race, to the three-year-old Royal George, who carried 8.2, and was a most appropriate wmnei, seeing that it was St. George's Day. — As lungs turned out, backers had, says the Wellington Post, all the best of the deal in betting ovei the Auckland National double. The winnig double wa-s laid by two local pencillers, at 100 to 4, but had tlie acceptors of the wagers waited until the day and put £4 on Moifaa slid played the lot up on Coeur de Lion, their total winnings would have been only £45 8s instead of £100. A one-time bicycle rider, at present staying in Wellington, hacked the double for £100, and a Kaiori resident did likewise. Smaller wagers were also landed locally over the deuble.

— A fine old English sportsman in Captain D. Bayley died recently at the ripe age of 80 years. He had bred and raced horses for many years, and among his best was Goisseeker, by The Miser— Swallow, who won the City aiid Suburban Handicap of 1889, fhereby giving the bookmakers a good turn, for with 8.0 u,p (he was then a four-yeai-oltt), he was thought to be out of the race, and started almost friendless at 50 to 1. Captain Bayley was one of the originators of the Herapton

Paik Racing Company, and had been a director evei since. — An interesting v. alking lace took place last month in Calcutta. Dr Mild Cook undertook to walk five miles against a pony, named Stewpidess, the course bei.ig on the ro«>ds about the great open snace which ir> s measure serves as the Park of" Calcutta. Dr Cook led fiom the stall, and coveicd the five miles in exactly 53mm, the ponj, udden by Mr Price, took 56miii, a'od n a s beaten by nearly a quaite 1 " of a li'ile. The animal's timo m the lace, we are told, wb not so good as she had done when training, and \^hat probably affected her Perieusly w£fs the fact that she had been newly shod.

— The race tiacks in New Yorfi State have to contribute annually 5 per cent, of iher gate takings, and this money is distiibuteJ in pienuv-ns by the various agricultural societies in the State to encourage the raising of cattle and oilier farm ptoducts. At one time racing was piohibited in the State by the Little New Englanders, ai.d it was only by pgrcemg to ppy this tax that the consent of the pious and incorruptible ( ; ) tanners was obtained to the revocation of the edict against racing. Last year the gat° lencipts of the seven racing associat.ons in the State amounted to nearly 2,000,000d01, which raear.s that they contributed close upon £20,000 to the revenue. — The following peculiar incident is related in Melbourne Sporting Judge in connection with the death of Mr Dean, who was killed while riding in a steeplechase at the recent Fmdon. . Harriers' meeting • — "On the night prior to meeting with his death, Mr Dean dreamed that he was ridmg m a steeplechase, and when crossing a fence saw his own corpse lying beside the obstacle. He told several well-known residents of Moonee Ponds about his dream, and one lady related to a prominent baker in that district, when she heard it from "Tommy's" lips on the Tuesday, tried very hard lo dissuade him. from riding in the race on the following day. He only smiled, and said that ' he was not superstitious.' " — Handicapper, who won the Two Thousand Guineas last month, was a baTgain when he was sold as a yearling, as Sir E. Cassel bought him for 380ge. Handicapper was ridden by Halsey, whose instrustions were to ride the horse out to a time trial. Speaking of the race, the "Special Commissioner" says: — "Halsey' s riding had a very great deal to do with to-day's victory. No one dreamed of his winning, and he was allowed to come right through, just like Sloan used to do in the stupid old days, until he had won his race a quarter of a mile from home, if his mount could maintain the same rate of speed to the end." Halsey rode Australian Star in the London Cup and City and Suburban Handicap. — A new tariff has been arranged in connection with the Newmarket meetings, and lower charges in various directions wilJ for 'the future bo made. For the inner enclosures the charge will now be £3 per day (including admission to the saddling paddock, except on the Two Thousand Guineas, Cesarewitoh, and Cambridgeshire days, when an extra charge of 10s will be made), and for the adjoining portion of the staid the tariff will be 10s a , day (without admission to paddock). Additional enclosures are set apart for the accommodation of the public at the Rowley Mile, at a daily charge of ss, and for admission to the saddling paddocks the charge is r.ow fixed at £1 for the week. A carriage enclosuie is 10s a day, or 110 for the year. — In the smoking carriage of the last train to Caulfield leceutly they were varying tlie customary routine of anecdote and chaS by asking riddles. One of the party, says. " Javelin, was a professional "turf adviser," and, with a sly glance at him, a well-known lightweight said: "Wots the difi'rence between a woman kissin' 'er baby ?n' one o' them advertisin' tipsters?" They all gave it up, an- the mannikm with the big pipe was unanimously awarded the cake when he explained tiiat "One mugs the kid, and the other 'kids' the mug!" Just before the train stopped, the champion joker squelched his rival by asking "When wos you like the sum on a schoolboy's slate the next morning" "Give^it up, Billy ? "Why, when you wos rubbed out!" — Lochiel's best son, Le Var, has been settled in West Australia at Messrs Mackay's Melville Park stud, and will begin his new life with a fairly long list of good mares. This list has been published by "'Paynatoi" in the Western Mail, and consists of Shadow, the dam of Wandering Willie, the "Carbine of the West, Yangedine, a sister to Wandering Willie ; Laura, the ex-Sydney galloway by Niagara from Cense and Blue; a filly by Progress from Inchcape (3), by Lord Wilton from Foambell, one of the Typhoon tribe; Baby Trenton, by Trenton from Courteous (.31, by Chester from Richmond's ?ister, Supeiba: Buzzabout II (1) by Grand Flaneur from Buzzabout, by Wilberforce from Agitation (imp.), the granddam of Quiver; a halfsister to Matador (by Calma), and a few localtybred mares. — There is a colt In America, by Dlrcctum— Little 'Witch, b} Director, that has a eieat prospect. Tins co'.t was tvo years eld on June 1"2. He was taken \ip for the fu-st time la3t November, and handled for a monlh. Hi& ownei sent him to a trainer on January H2, and in April " the colt trotted a quarter in 3S|sec very handily. He has fine action, a level head, and every horseman &t Pleasaiiton considers him one of the greatest prospects e\er seen on the track fh/»i?. as the colt is entered m several big stakes to be trotted m the Ea?t ne.it year, lus o-nnei h.i -. opened correspondence with Charles Marvin, the well-known trainer, formerly of Palo Alto, but now the proprietor of a breeding iarm in Kentucky, with a view Of having him train the colt and race him next year. — A well-known Tasmanian jockey was arrested in Launceston on June 3, charged with wilful murder. It appears that a young man named John Francis Manning, accompanied by a couple "of friends, called at accused's house at about 11 p.m. on the evening of the day named to recover a handkerchief, supposed to have been left there m the afternoon. In response to Manning's knock, Mrs Hayes was about to open the door, when her husband arrived on the scene and knocked her down. Picking up a heavy piece of gaspipe, he said to Manning, "Look what jou've made me do. I'm going to kill you now. ' And, suiting the action to the word, he struck the unfortunate fellow to the ground -with such force that the hrjuiies terminated fatally one hour later. WTien taken into custody Hayes said, "My God, I didn't mean it." — The Taranaki Meti opoktan Committee met recently to consider the endorsement of the disqualification for two yeais of the gelding Tukapa, and jockey, W. Holmes, by the Egmont Racing^ Club. The owner and trainer of Tukapa, D. Croz-ler, was, present, his case being conducted by Mr T. S. Weston. After going fully into the case, says an exchange, the committee passed the following resolution "That the disqualification for two years, imposed by the Egmont Racing Club, of the horse Tukapa in respect of the Railway Handicap, at Hawera, "on May S, be not endorsed, as tlie stewards did not find that the owner was culpable." W. Holmes, the jockey, was also present, and gave evidence. He asked foi an adjournment for a week in order to obtain "the services of counsel. The committee acceded to his lequest, and adjourned the inquiry till Friday night, June 14. —An English write remarks' — The New Zealand 'ch?ser Levanter has put his party m the hole every time they have had any money on him, and I should think Major Edwards must be pTetty well tired of paying his hay and. corn bill, The Gaiety Company, 'tis

said, backed the horoe for the National, as if the race weie a gift for the cxpatuated Maoriland leapcr. They, ot course, "went down wop," but in the Lancashire Steeplechase tney thought Levanter would recoup them, aim the New Zealand geldmg, with the featherweight of 9.13 up, started at 7 to 1 in a field of 14. Once more he flattered but to deceive, ar.d could only finish fifth to Coragh Hill, which won by half a stieet, Crudon, the National wuinei, having bioken down when leading a few hundred yards from home. Levanter, I suppose, will come home some fine day when Ins sorely-tried connections haven't a pennypiece on, but so far as he has been a giast'y failure.

— It is the fashion in England powadays to treat racehorses of good class in a very careful timid manner (writes "Ranger") , they aie not frequently brought out to run m public. Alter they have won p six-furlong race with fbout 8.0 on their back, the prize being valuable and the bets satisfactory, they often retire into private life for a considerable period. They are not a c ked to over-exert or tire themselves. They are not kept m cotton woo', but they have some of th?t wool, perhaps, on their forelegs under the bandages when they do easy cantering exercise. The idea of running them twice duimg the same afternoon even in a sprint race — for they do not care to travel Hong distances when short cuts are more remunerative — would be laughed at by their owner, and their tiainer would say that he knew what he was doing. Yet, with all this coddling and precaution, few racehorses of any class last long on the turf at the present time. Their legs go wrong, or their temper, or probably both go wrong, with their wind and other desn-able qualities ; hence they are put to the stud as soon as possible, with a flqurish of trumpets, before the worst is known about them. What then- stock is likely to be one may imagine without any difficulty. A dash of speed, bad legs, a wild temper, no constitution.

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Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2466, 19 June 1901

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2466, 19 June 1901

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